Bienvenidos a las Naciones Unidas

Reports and Policy Documents

2020

  • 8 Jun 2020

    New York, 9 June 2020

    There is more than enough food in the world to feed our population of 7.8 billion people.  

    But, today, more than 820 million people are hungry.  

    And some 144 million children under the age of 5 are stunted – more than one in five children worldwide.  

    Our food systems are failing, and the...

  • 8 Jun 2020

    TRIPOLI, 08 June 2020 – The United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) welcomes the opening of the Sharara and El Feel oil fields this weekend. The oil blockade...

  • 8 Jun 2020

    KABUL - In the context of Afghanistan’s long-running conflict, building social cohesion and cultivating a sense of solidarity are essential for fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, said...

  • 7 Jun 2020

     

    New York, 8 June 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic is a sharp reminder of how we are all intimately connected -- to each other and to nature.

    As we work to end the pandemic and build back better, we have a once-in-a-generation opportunity – and responsibility -- to correct our relationship with the natural world, including the world’s seas and oceans.

    We rely on the...

  • 7 Jun 2020

    Tripoli, 07 June 2020 - The tragedy that has beset Libya for more than a year has proven, beyond any doubt, that any war among Libyans is a losing war.  There can be no real victor, only heavy losses for...

  • 5 Jun 2020

    The United Nations Integrated Transition Assistance Mission in Sudan (UNITAMS) was established on 3 June 2020 by Security Council resolution 2524, for an initial period of twelve months. The Mission was headquartered in Khartoum and had a mandate spanning the entire country. 

     

    UNITAMS’ overarching objective was to support the Sudanese democratic transition. To that end, the Mission was mandated by the Security Council to assist the political transition, progress towards democratic governance, in the protection and promotion of human rights and sustainable peace, as well as to support peace processes and the implementation of peace agreements, peacebuilding, civilian protection and rule of law, and the mobilization of economic and development assistance and coordination of humanitarian assistance.

     

    On 3 June 2021, the Security Council adopted resolution 2579 (2021) extending the mandate of UNITAMS by a further twelve months. The resolution retained the Mission’s original strategic objectives, while prioritizing some elements of the mandate, including: ceasefire monitoring as part of Juba Peace Agreement (JPA) implementation; support to the implementation of the National Plan for Civilian Protection; support to the peace talks; support to the implementation of power-sharing arrangements per the JPA; support to the constitution-drafting process; and capacity-building of the Sudan Police Force and the justice sector.

     

    UNITAMS complemented the ongoing work of the United Nations Agencies, Funds and Programmes on the ground and worked closely with the Sudanese transitional Government and the people of Sudan in support of their democratic transition.

     

    On 3 June 2022, the Security Council renewed the mandate of UNITAMS for a further year until 3 June 2023, according to resolution 2636 (2022). The mandate of the Mission was renewed again on 3 June 2023 for an additional six months, according to resolution 2685 (2023).

     

    On 1 December 2023, the Security Council passed resolution 2715 (2023), which determined the termination of UNITAMS’ mandate on 3 December 2023, and stipulated for the Mission to complete the transfer of its tasks, where appropriate and feasible, to United Nations agencies, funds and programmes by 29 February 2024.

  • 5 Jun 2020

     

    30 May - 5 June 2020

    This Week in DPPA is a brief roundup of political and peacebuilding events and developments at UNHQ and around the world.

    COVID-19

    Central Asia – The impact of COVID-19 on preventing violent extremism and countering terrorism
    UNRCCA, in partnership with the UN Counter Terrorism Centre (UNCCT), on 4 June convened regional online consultations with the Institutes of Strategic Studies and other state institutions of the Central Asian states to discuss the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on preventing violent extremism and countering terrorism. Vladimir Voronkov, Under-Secretary-General for Counter-Terrorism, and Miroslav Jenča, Assistant Secretary-General for Europe, Central Asia and Americas, took part in the online meeting. In her opening statement, Special Representative Natalia Gherman, pointed out that “while the world is focused on COVID-19, other challenges to peace and security have not disappeared. Issues related to violent extremism and terrorism could become even more pressing in the post-pandemic era, and we have to be prepared for different scenarios and preventive measures.” 
    Read more here


    Colombia - The challenge of producing food during the pandemic
    In La Variante's reintegration area in Tumaco-Nariño, southwestern Colombia, nearly 80 former combatants are growing pineapple, aloe, plantain, and lemon as part of their reintegration process. With the support of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), this group already has a marketing channel for plantain with a wellknown supermarket in the main city, Tumaco. Despite the pandemic, they continue to produce and managed to sell 400 kilos. "It is not easy, there is a lot of competition, and prices have dropped," says Ricardo, leader of the Reintegration Area. In light of the the restrictions necessitated by the pandemic, people in the reintegration process are receiving telephone support from the UN Verification Mission in Colombia, FAO, and the Agency for Reintegration and Normalization. This week they were preparing 200 kilos more of plantains for sale.
    For more Information, contact us

     

    Women's role essential for a global ceasefire
    The head of UN Women and the Under-Secretaries-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs and Peace Operations made a joint call this week to put women at the center of global ceasefire efforts. They said that the global COVID-19 pandemic is a wake-up call: the world cannot face conflict and a pandemic at the same time. Women everywhere are working against tremendous odds to bring about peace. “With women fully engaged, we will emerge stronger from the crisis,” they emphasized.
    Watch the appeal here

     

    Group of Friends of the Peacebuilding Fund discuss COVID-19
    The first virtual meeting of the Group of Friends of the UN Secretary-General’s Peacebuilding Fund (PBF) took place on 3 June, convened by the Permanent Missions of Sweden and the United Kingdom. The participants reviewed the first quarter investments of the Fund and how PBF had adapted to a new layer of risk faced by the COVID-19 pandemic. In the first quarter of this year, total contributions to PBF were USD 33.3 million, an increase from USD 7.2 million in 2019 and the Fund approved a total of USD 26.1 million, an increase from USD 1.5 million in 2019. The countries declared eligible for PBF by the Secretary-General in the first quarter of 2020 include Mauritania, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Honduras. Marc-André Franche, Chief, Financing for Peacebuilding Branch, highlighted the Fund's role in mitigating the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic through support to five types of demands from the Resident Coordinators: Crisis management and communications; Inclusive and equitable response and recovery; Intercommunity social cohesion and border management; countering hate speech, stigmatization and addressing trauma; and the Secretary-General's Global Call for Ceasefire.
    For more Information, contact us

     

    PBC meeting on socio-economic response to COVID-19 in peacebuilding contexts
    An ambassadorial-level Peacebuilding Commission meeting on 5 June highlighted the need to tailor the socio-economic response to COVID-19 in peacebuilding contexts. Abdoulaye Mar Dieye, Assistant Secretary-General for Development Coordination and Special Advisor to the UNDP Administrator, presented the peacebuilding aspects of the UN Framework for the Immediate Socio-Economic Response to COVID-19. Oscar Fernandez-Taranco, Assistant Secretary-General for Peacebuilding Support noted PBF complementary contributions in guiding conflict-sensitive UN responses to COVID-19 at the country level. Representatives of civil society and the private sector presented examples of innovative local community and business solutions, which significantly contribute to the effectiveness of COVID- 19 response and recovery plans and need to be factored in when designing government policies and negotiating stimulus packages. The PBC reiterated its commitment to continue advocating for a coordinated, people-centered and conflict-sensitive global response, putting into practice the Secretary-General’s “Shared Responsibility, Global Solidarity” report. The Commission recognized how the crisis is helping to bring the UN system together and encouraged continuous collaboration between the development system and the peacebuilding architecture to more effectively assist societies in their efforts to foster social cohesion and community resilience during and after the pandemic. The Importance of ensuring complementarity between PBF and other central UN funds was underscored in this regard.
    For more Information, contact us


    For up-to-date information on COVID-19 and its impact, please visit:   
    WHO website  
    UN coronavirus website 

     

     

     

    Security Council

    New special political mission for Sudan
    The Security Council approved a new special political mission for Sudan, the UN Integrated Transition Assistance Mission in Sudan (UNITAMS), on 4 June. The mission will aim to assist Sudan in its transition, back up peace efforts and support the protection and promotion of human rights. “We're committed to helping make the country's democratic transition and development a success. Our planning to deploy the new mission continues, in consultation with authorities and partners,” Under-Secretary-General Rosemary DiCarlo said in a tweet.
    More in UN News

     

    Central Asia

    Central Asia Launch of essay contest
    The UN Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy for Central Asia (UNRCCA) launched an essay contest for young people across Central Asia this week, named “Youth Voices from Central Asia – UN75 and Regional Peace and Security.” Young people are asked to think about the world they want to see in 25 years – the 100th anniversary of the founding of the United Nations – and the ways that preventive diplomacy and regional peace and security can impact that vision. The contest is open to anyone between the ages of 18 and 35 who are citizens of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan or Afghanistan. Deadline: 31 July.
    Read more here

    Colombia

    Ruiz Massieu: the implementation of the peace agreement is an achievement of Colombia and for Colombia
    The Special Jurisdiction for Peace on 4 June launched the System for Monitoring Risks and Preventing Violations to Human Rights in Colombia, a platform that will analyze news content and allegations of human rights violations against former combatants, social leaders, victims, members of law enforcement and human rights defenders. In a statement, Special Representative Carlos Ruiz Massieu said that "the Comprehensive System of Truth, Justice, Reparation, and Non-Repetition, seek to keep the victims at the center of the Agreement implementation. In this case, the Monitoring System's main objective is to protect the lives of those who participate in the peace process, peacebuilding, and to prevent even more victims in the country. The achievements of the Comprehensive System are achievements of the Peace Agreement implementation, and as we all know, the implementation of the Peace Agreement is an achievement of Colombia and for Colombia." The online event was chaired by the President of the Special Jurisdiction for Peace, Patricia Linares.
    For more Information, contact us

     

    Palestine

    United Nations Forum on Palestine
    The UN Palestinian Rights Committee held a United Nations Forum on “The Question of Palestine: Threats of Annexation and the Prospects for Peace” on 4 June. Three prominent speakers - Ms. Hanan Ashrawi, Member of the PLO Executive Committee and former member of the Palestinian team in the Middle East Peace Process; Mr. Yossi Beilin, Former Israeli Cabinet Minister and participant in the 1993 Oslo Accord negotiations; Mr. James Zogby, Founder and President of the Arab American Institute - spoke and answered questions from the audience. The event was moderated by Ambassador Neville Gertze of Namibia.
    Watch the event here

     

    Outreach

    Electoral assistance in focus at meeting with member States
    DPPA held another session of its new Talking Prevention information series on 3 June to provide an overview of the work of our Electoral Affairs Division and its collaboration with the UN Development Programme (UNDP). Participants, including representatives of some 35 member States, heard about the implementation of electoral assistance in the field as well as support to country initiatives and cooperation with regional organizations. The meeting was also an opportunity to call for continued support for DPPA’s work.
    Read more about electoral assistance here

     

    Conflict-related sexual violence

    Launch of handbook
    Four UN entities and the Permanent Mission of Norway launched on 5 June the Handbook for United Nations Field Missions on Preventing and Responding to Conflict-Related Sexual Violence (CRSV). Building on the new United Nations policy on the issue adopted in January 2020, the Handbook aims to provide practical guidance to civilian, military and police components of Field Missions and increase their capacities to prevent and respond to CRSV. The Policy and Handbook were developed jointly by DPPA, the Department of Peace Operations (DPO), the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), and the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict (OSRSG-SVC). Under-Secretary-General DiCarlo took part in the meeting.
    Watch the event here

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    Contact DPPA at dppa@un.org

  • 5 Jun 2020

    The Secretary-General recognized the findings of the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (August 2021) -- that the world is facing unprecedented risks from climate change and that every region is affected – as a “code red for humanity”.  Inevitably, given the magnitude of the climate emergency, its cascading effects extend beyond the environmental sphere and into the social and political realm. While climate change is rarely – if ever – the primary cause of conflict, it can act as a risk multiplier, exacerbating underlying vulnerabilities and compounding existing grievances.

    Understanding and responding to climate-related security risks has become a strategic priority for the Department of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs (DPPA), as is reflected in its Strategic Plan for 2023-2026.  Such risks are highly context-specific, with impacts that vary across regions, countries and communities, requiring integrated analysis and responses as women, men and youth are affected in different ways. The risks are greatest where past or current conflicts have undermined the capacity of institutions and communities to absorb the additional stress brought on by climate change or adapt to the changing environment.

    As the Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, Rosemary DiCarlo, stressed in a briefing to the Security Council in 2020, climate change has major implications for our ability to prevent conflict and sustain peace around the world. This is true in contexts where DPPA manages special political missions (the majority of which are deployed in highly climate vulnerable countries according to the ND-GAIN Index) as well as in non-mission settings, where DPPA supports UN Resident Coordinators on conflict prevention, peacemaking and peacebuilding, including through the Joint UNDP-DPPA Programme on Building National Capacities for Conflict Prevention.

    DPPA is making targeted efforts to adapt its practices and methods to a climate changing world, including by integrating climate change considerations into analytical and planning mechanisms as well as into prevention, mediation and peacebuilding strategies. Key activities include targeted analysiscoordination for actionenvironmental approaches to prevention, and the development of new guidance in DPPA core areas, such as the mediation of armed conflict. In line with its Security Council mandate, the UN Assistance Mission in Somalia was the first UN field mission to deploy dedicated capacity on climate security to assess climate-related security risks, develop appropriate risk management strategies, and report findings to the Security Council. Similar efforts are underway in other contexts where the Council has recognized the adverse effects of climate change, among other factors, on stability. Since climate-related security risks are not felt equally by everyone, DPPA pays particular attention to the impact on women as well as the potential of women as agents of change.

    Given the complex nature of the linkages between climate change, peace and security, DPPA pursues in integrated approaches and multi-layered partnerships. In an effort to promote approaches that combine peacebuilding with resilience and adaptation efforts, DPPA, through the Peacebuilding Fund, invests in a growing number of climate-sensitive peacebuilding projects around the world. The Department also seeks to strengthen partnerships with regional organizations, governments, civil society, and the research community to build on existing capacities, support local solutions, and strengthen the global evidence base on climate-related security risks.


    CLIMATE SECURITY MECHANISM

    An important component of DPPA’s efforts to understand and address the linkages between climate change, peace and security is the Climate Security Mechanism (CSM). Established in 2018 as a joint initiative between DPPA, the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), and joined by DPO in late 2021, the CSM seeks to help the UN system address climate-related security risks more systematically. See the CSM 2023 Progress Report here.

    To this end, the CSM supports field missions, UN Resident Coordinators and regional organizations to conduct climate security risk assessments and develop risk management strategies. The CSM has also established a UN Community of Practice on Climate Security as an informal forum for information exchange and knowledge co-creation. The group – which convenes around more than 500 personnel from 25 UN entities – meets every few weeks and is open to all UN staff interested in this topic.


    TRAINING AND TOOLBOX

    An additional priority for the CSM is capacity building to help strengthen our collective ability to advance prevention and sustaining peace in a climate-changing world. Jointly with partners, the CSM has developed a toolbox to help foster a shared approach to the analysis of climate-related security risks and shape integrated and timely responses. The toolbox is available to all practitioners and contains the following guidance documents:

    • Overview (en/fr/sp)
    • Briefing note on climate security (en/fr/sp)
    • Conceptual approach to risk assessments (en/fr/sp)
    • Relevant data sources (en/fr/sp)
    • Checklist to help climate-proof political analysis (en/fr/sp)

    WORKSHOP

    14-16 November 2023, Cairo: Workshop on Multilateral Partnerships on Climate, Peace and Security

     
    CONTACT

    Please enquire here for more information.

  • 5 Jun 2020

    Violent conflict is complex; its causes and consequences are not fixed in time or place. To better understand how to prevent and resolve conflict, the Department of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs studies the factors contributing to violence and how to address them. As it strives to innovate to meet emerging challenges in the realm of global peace and security, DPPA is, for example, researching and experimenting with new approaches that leverage digital technology in mediation and prevention, and is looking at the potential links between climate change and conflict.

  • 5 Jun 2020

    This Handbook is intended to serve as a practical guide to support the implementation of the CRSV mandate by United Nations Field Missions, including Peacekeeping Operations and Special Political Missions. It serves both as a guidance for civilians, military, and police personnel deployed to United Nations Field Missions and as a pre-deployment orientation tool for future Mission personnel.

  • 4 Jun 2020

    #MakeItRight: A campaign by UN Lebanon and TBWA\RAAD on World Environment Day

    ...
  • 4 Jun 2020
  • 1 Jun 2020

    Tripoli, 01 June 2020 - The United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) welcomes the acceptance by the Government of...

  • 31 Mayo 2020

    In a newly published paper, the United Nations argues that the COVID-19 emergency underscores the inadequacy of the frameworks governing the economic and administrative relationships between Israel and Palestine. While welcoming Israeli-Palestinian cooperation to deal with the health crisis, the UN warns that, if current trends continue, the achievements of the Palestinian Government over the last quarter century will fade, the peace and security...

  • 30 Mayo 2020

    In countries suffering from conflict, readjusting to life in a peaceful society is a challenge, both for former fighters and the wider community. Since the spread of the COVID-19 crisis, the UN is having to refocus many of its programmes, aimed at reducing violence in communities, and rehabilitating combatants.

  • 29 Mayo 2020

    To honour the more than 3,900 women and men who have lost their lives under the UN flag since 1948, Secretary-General António Guterres laid a wreath at the Peacekeepers’ memorial on Friday, International Day of UN Peacekeepers.

  • 29 Mayo 2020

     

    23 - 29 May 2020

    This Week in DPPA is a brief roundup of political and peacebuilding events and developments at UNHQ and around the world.

    COVID-19

    Iraq - Individual responsibility essential to confront COVID-19
    In a statement on 27 May, UNAMI applauded the Iraqi government’s leadership and decisive response to the COVID-19 outbreak at a time when it is also confronting separate crises, including social unrest and an unprecedented economic downturn. “No amount of government response can succeed without the active involvement of the entire population,” Special Representative Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert stressed.“Despite the high hardship imposed by these measures, we know that they represent our best hope of getting back on our feet as soon as possible,” she added.
    Read more here

    Colombia: Former combatants help blunt COVID-19 impact with food donation
    A group of 15 former FARC-EP combatants and their families joined together to donate part of their bean and plantain harvest to the most needy inhabitants of Chamuscados, a rural community in Antioquia, northwest Colombia. The food was distributed during an event on 23 May in the town of Dabeiba. The former combatants are receiving technical advice from the Colombian Government to establish future commercialization channels that will allow them to improve their living conditions. The UN Verification Mission in Colombia is supporting that process.
    For more Information, contact us 

    Colombia: Former combatants in Chocó, advance in their social reintegration
    This week, and despite the difficult circumstances due to the COVID-19 pandemic, former combatants started a sustainable food production project as a contribution to food security and nutrition for 56 families living in the former Territorial Area for Training and Reintegration (TATR) in Brisas, department of Chocó, on the Pacific side of Colombia. With the support of the World Food Program (WFP), men and women members of the TATR’s agricultural cooperative grow vegetables for their consumption and produce poultry and fish. The UN Verification Mission in Colombia accompanies this project that seeks to contribute to peacebuilding, food sovereignty, and strengthening the agricultural capacities of the families living there.
    For more Information, contact us 



     

    Virtual Talk on Indigenous Peoples, COVID-19 and Conflict Prevention
    DPPA-DPO’s Americas Division, hosted on 28 May a virtual talk on “Indigenous Peoples, COVID-19 and Conflict Prevention”. The Division is DPPA’s focal point on indigenous issues. Participants discussed the importance of including and empowering indigenous women and men as political and social actors amidst the pandemic to reduce the risk of escalation of conflicts resulting from the impacts of COVID-19. Key takeaways from the discussion were: i) Violence against indigenous peoples, including in border areas was on the rise; ii) A regression in the protection of indigenous peoples' rights was expected, increasing the potential for conflicts around natural resources; iii) The militarization of indigenous lands occurring as part of states’ responses to the pandemic further increased social tensions and conflicts; iv) Indigenous women were disproportionately impacted and violence against them was escalating; v) A guidance note on indigenous peoples and COVID-19, issued by the UN Inter-Agency Support Group on Indigenous Issues available in English, French and Spanish, offered entry points for UN engagement on prevention.
    For more Information, contact us 


    For up-to-date information on COVID-19 and its impact, please visit:   
    WHO website  
    UN coronavirus website 

     

     

     

    Eid al-Fitr

    Afghanistan
    “We share your hopes for an Eid without conflict so every family can celebrate this auspicious and important time in peace,“ the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan said on the occasion of Eid al-Fitr earlier this week. Deborah Lyons, Special Representative and Head of UNAMA, said, “I urge all those in positions of power to do everything possible to stop the violence and to respect this time of reflection and tolerance“.
    Read more here

    Yemen
    Special Envoy Martin Griffiths also issued a statement on the occasion of Eid al-Fitr. “May the spirit of Eid guide us all to achieve sustainable peace and stability for all men, women and children in Yemen, redirect the country toward reconciliation and recovery, and pave the way for a better future,“ Mr. Griffiths said.
    Read more here

    Somalia
    Meanwhile, the UN family in Somalia extended its warm congratulations to all Somalis “The United Nations wishes a peaceful and safe Eid al-Fitr to the people of Somalia as we come to the end of the holy month of Ramadan, a time for celebration and togetherness,” Special Representative James Swan said.
    Read more here

     

    Peacebuilding

    New members of advisory group appointed
    Secretary-General António Guterres on 28 May appointed the members of the Sixth Advisory Group of the Peacebuilding Fund. The UN Peacebuilding Fund is the organization’s financial instrument of first resort to sustain peace in countries or situations at risk or affected by violent conflict. From 2006 to 2017, the Fund approved a total of USD $772 million to 41 recipient countries, and from 2017 to 2019, it scaled up its commitments by approving USD $531 million for 51 countries. Consistent with the Terms of Reference of the Peacebuilding Fund adopted by the General Assembly, the Secretary-General appoints ten eminent individuals for a term of two years, taking into consideration gender and regional balance. Candidates are nominated by Member States, including countries contributing to the Fund. 
    Read more here

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    Contact DPPA at dppa@un.org

  • 29 Mayo 2020

    On the occasion of the 45th anniversary of the founding of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), I wish,...

  • 29 Mayo 2020

     

     UN in Lebanon scales up efforts to respond to key gender issues...

  • 28 Mayo 2020

    Tripoli, 29 May 2020 – I am shocked by the horrific reports about Wednesday’s shooting at a smuggling warehouse in Mezda killing 30 migrants and injuring 11 others. 

    Human...

  • 28 Mayo 2020

     The global coronavirus pandemic is testing the multilateral system like never before and the Security Council must stop the “infighting”, and step up to the challenge, the European Union’s foreign policy chief told the 15-member body on Thursday.

  • 27 Mayo 2020

    Health professionals are the group most exposed to the new Coronavirus, as they are at the forefront of combating the disease, as they are constantly in contact with patients.

    In Guinea Bissau...

  • 27 Mayo 2020

    In observance of the International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers, on Friday, Secretary-General António Guterres will lay a wreath to pay tribute to all the UN blue helmets who have lost their lives since 1948.

  • 27 Mayo 2020

    H.E Mrs. Amira Elfadil - AU Commissioner for Social Affairs (center) signs the Sportlight Initiative (Africa) with SRSG Hanna Tetteh (UN) and Ambassador Ranieri Sabatucci, Head of the European Union Delegation to the African Union...

  • 27 Mayo 2020

    Innocent civilians trapped in violence now face “a new and deadly threat” from COVID-19, the UN chief told the Security Council on Wednesday, warning that the pandemic is “amplifying and exploiting the fragilities of our world”.

  • 25 Mayo 2020

    For the first time, the UN Military Gender Advocate award has been awarded to two UN peacekeepers: Commander Carla Monteiro de Castro Araujo, a Brazilian Naval officer, and Major Suman Gawani, of the Indian Army.

  • 25 Mayo 2020

    Tripoli, 25 May 2020 - The United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) is extremely concerned about reports that residents of the Ain Zara and...

  • 24 Mayo 2020

    African countries have “demonstrated commendable leadership” battling the COVID-19 pandemic, but more nations across the continent where conflict prevails, should heed the UN call for a global ceasefire to push back the deadly virus, said the Secretary-General on Monday.

  • 24 Mayo 2020

    The UN Secretary-General has welcomed the announcement by the Afghan Government and the Taliban of a ceasefire to mark the end of Ramadan, the holy month of fasting for Muslims around the world.

  • 23 Mayo 2020

    NEW YORK - The Secretary-General welcomes the announcement by the Government of Afghanistan and the Taliban of a ceasefire to enable the Afghan people to celebrate the Eid al-Fitr...

  • 23 Mayo 2020

    PRESS STATEMENT 09/2020

    Mogadishu – The United Nations family in Somalia extends its warm congratulations to all Somalis on the occasion of Eid-al-Fitr.

    “The United Nations wishes a peaceful and safe Eid-al-Fitr to...

  • 23 Mayo 2020

    In several countries afflicted by years of armed conflict, The UN assists with law and order issues, including policing expertise. This work is being challenged, as never before, by the COVID-19 pandemic. In this interview with UN News, Luis Carrilho, head of the UN Police Division, describes how the virus is affecting the ability of his colleagues to keep the peace.

  • 22 Mayo 2020

    The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on Friday condemned a fresh wave of intercommunal violence in the world’s youngest nation, South Sudan, that has left hundreds dead across 28 villages in Jonglei State, according to local authorities. 

  • 22 Mayo 2020

     

    16 - 22 May 2020

    This Week in DPPA is a brief roundup of political and peacebuilding events and developments at UNHQ and around the world.

    COVID-19

    DiCarlo: Risks related to COVID-19 especially high in conflict settings 
    The impact of COVID-19 on conflict dynamics and mediation was on the agenda when Under-Secretary-General Rosemary DiCarlo addressed the Antalya Diplomatic Forum on 19 May. “Though the COVID-19 pandemic is foremost a health crisis, it also has wide-ranging humanitarian, economic, and human rights dimensions. And it risks hitting conflict settings especially hard,” Ms. DiCarlo said. The pandemic has not stopped peacemaking, though it has profoundly affected it, Ms. DiCarlo noted, before adding that, even with limitations, remote dialogue can create opportunities and make peace processes more inclusive, enhancing participation of women, young people and others.   
    Read her full remarks here
    Watch the event here

    "We must build back better"
    The Under-Secretary-General also headlined an event organized by the Atlantic Council around the question: “Will COVID-19 Exacerbate or Defuse Conflicts in the Middle East?” Ms. DiCarlo said the pandemic has thrown up some opportunities for cooperation in the region, but in some cases had only made matters worse. “I think we will overcome COVID-19, I believe so, though obviously not unscathed. It will take a lot of vigilance and hard work, at the UN, between individual states or groups of countries, in civil society, among many of you. But we have a chance to go beyond recovery. We can safeguard the progress achieved over the last 75 years that helped societies prevent, resolve and rebuild from violent conflict. But we can do more. We must build back better,” the Under-Secretary-General concluded.  
    Read her full remarks here  
    Watch the event here

     

    Somalia: COVID-19 – impact and response 
    In a photo essay published this week, the UN Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) summed up the impact and response of COVID-19 in the country. Somalia joined the long list of countries dealing with COVID-19 on 16 March, when federal Health Minister Fawziya Abikar announced the first confirmed case. A series of urgent measures have been taken to counter the ‘crippling effects of the coronavirus’ and halt the virus’ spread. The photo essay provides a snapshot of some of the pandemic’s impact and the steps taken by the Somali people and government to combat it.  
    Read more here

     

    Afghanistan: Accurate information empowers communities in the fight against COVID-19 
    Access to accurate information helps reduce anxiety and serves to empower Afghanistan’s communities in the fight against COVID-19, said participants in a recent series of UNAMA-backed radio programmes broadcast across the country. In the pre-recorded interactive shows, which have so far aired in six provinces, health experts and radio hosts answered questions posed by local residents and discussed the importance of media conveying facts to communities that cannot otherwise access reliable information about the health crisis. 
    Read more here

    Middle East - Medical supplies delivered to Palestine in an attempt to curb the pandemic  
    In a press statement on 19 May, UNSCO and Special Coordinator Nickolay Mladenov expressed gratitude to the Government of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) for the delivery of sixteen tons of urgent medical supplies to the occupied Palestinian territory (oPt). The supplies will support the efforts to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. The aid includes personal protective equipment (PPE) and medical equipment. Most notably, it includes ten ventilators that are acutely needed. This aid is in line with the United Nations COVID-19 Response Plan for the oPt. The plan supports the efforts led by the Government of Palestine to contain the pandemic and mitigate its impact. 
    Read more here 

     

    Africa Dialogue Series: A call for continued political dialogue
    DPPA-DPO Assistant Secretary-General Bintou Keita participated in the 2020 Africa Dialogue Series (ADS), held from 20 to 22 May under the theme ‘COVID-19 and Silencing the Guns in Africa: Challenges and Opportunities.’ The meeting, held virtually, was organized by the Office of the Special Adviser on Africa (OSAA) in cooperation with the AU Commission, DPPA, DPO, the Department of Global Communications (DGC), the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) and UN Women. The ADS is an annual event that brings together policy makers, academics and civil society to discuss current and emerging African issues. ASG Keita outlined the support provided by the UN Task Force on Silencing the Guns. She stressed the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on youth and women, and the importance of reaching consensus on decisions related to electoral timetables. She called for continued dialogue in political and peace processes across the continent.
    For more Information, contact us 


    For up-to-date information on COVID-19 and its impact, please visit:   
    WHO website  
    UN coronavirus website 

     

    Security Council

    Pedersen: "We must at all costs avoid reversion to the all-out fighting and abuses and violations” 
    Special Envoy Geir O. Pedersen updated the Security Council on the situation in Syria on 18 May. He informed the Council that while the COVID-19 pandemic has yet to envelop in the country, fear abounds that “it still could do so.” Despite progress in Russian-Turkish cooperation, Mr. Pedersen expressed concern over a number of violent incidents.  “Violence continues and there is a constant risk of escalation which could unravel existing arrangement,” the Special Envoy said. “We must at all costs avoid reversion to the all-out fighting and abuses and violations we have seen before.”  
    Read his full remarks here 
    Read more in UN News  


     

     

     

     

    Williams: "We must enable responsible Libyans to write their own future." 
    Acting Special Representative Stephanie T. Williams on 19 May updated the Council on the work of UNSMIL and the political situation in Libya. “From what we are witnessing in terms of the massive influx of weaponry, equipment and mercenaries to the two sides, the only conclusion that we can draw is that this war will intensify, broaden and deepen - with devastating consequences for the Libyan people”, Ms. Williams said. "As the foreign intervention increases, the Libyans themselves are getting lost in the mix, their voices crowded out. We must not let Libya slip away. We must enable responsible Libyans to write their own future"  
    Read her full remarks here 
    Read the latest report on the work of UNSMIL here 
    Read more in UN News  

     

    Mladenov: Urgent actions need to preserve the prospect of a two-State solution  
    Nickolay Mladenov, Special Coordinator and Head of UNSCO, updated on the situation in the Middle East on 20 May. He told the Council that all sides must do their part in the coming weeks and months to preserve the prospect of a two-State solution, in line with internationally agreed parameters, international law and UN resolutions. “The fate of the Palestinian and Israeli people must not be determined by destructive unilateral action that cements division and may put peace beyond reach in our lifetime,” the Special Coordinator said.   
    Read his full remarks here 
    Read more in UN News 
     

    DiCarlo: “Venezuela is mired in a deepening protracted crisis that only Venezuelans can resolve” 
    Under-Secretary-General Rosemary DiCarlo updated the Council on the situation in Venezuela on 20 May. “Venezuela is mired in a deepening protracted crisis that only Venezuelans can resolve,” Ms. DiCarlo said. “Attempts at reaching a negotiated solution have been unsuccessful in spite of significant international facilitation efforts. The path of negotiation seems to be stalled.” 5.1 million Venezuelans have gone abroad due to the economic meltdown and dire humanitarian crisis in the country. The power struggle between President Nicolás Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó drags on.  
    Read her full remarks here 
    Read more in UN News


     

    Swan: “The consequences [of COVID-19] for Somalia are acute” 
    James Swan, Special Representative and Head of UNSOM, on 21 May briefed on the situation in Somalia. “The consequences for Somalia are acute. Even before COVID, more than 5 million Somalis required humanitarian assistance. The 2.6 million internally displaced persons are particularly at risk. Nearly one million Somalis are now affected by flooding, and the country also faces its worst desert locust infestation in some 25 years,” Mr. Swan told the Council.  “The UN family is working to reinforce the Government’s response,” he assured. He also spoke about the upcoming direct elections this year, the first in Somalia since 1969. “The coming weeks will be decisive in determining how Somalia will proceed to these elections,” The Special Representative said.  
    Read his full remarks here 
    Read more in UN News 

     

    Women, Peace and Security

    2020 Virtual Stockholm Forum on Peace and Development 
    DPPA together with the Stockholm International Peace and Research Institute (SIPRI) and the Swedish Dialogue Institute for the Middle East and North Africa, co-organized a session on “Geopolitics and the WPS agenda: Northeast Asia and the Middle East” as part of the 2020 Virtual Stockholm Forum on Peace and Development on 19 May. This session was a follow-up to the DPPA Northeast Asian WPS experts meeting held in Beijing in December 2019 (co-organized with SIPRI and UN Women). The session allowed representatives from the women’s movement in Northeast Asia to address joint perspectives and challenges with their peers from Syria and Yemen. The main takeaways from the session included: (a) returning to the original pillars of the Security Council Resolution 1325 on protection, prevention and participation; (b) the need for a fundamental shift from military and security-centered to human security-focused peacemaking in the post COVID-19 world; (c) addressing underlying issue of gender equality to effectively implement the WPS agenda; and (d) strengthening the national and regional networks of women’s groups and movements. 
    For more Information, contact us 


    Colombia

    Community-based approach to the reintegration process advances in Quibdó 
    The United Nations Verification Mission in Colombia, with the support of the United Nations Development Program, continues to join efforts in the implementation of quick impact projects for people in the reintegration process. On 18 May, a group of 29 women in Quibdó, Chocó, received delivery of significant equipment to start a restaurant. The group of former combatants hopes to help other women in the community with employment opportunities, working together in the promotion of women's rights and peacebuilding in this region of the country. 
    For more Information, contact us 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    Contact DPPA at dppa@un.org

  • 22 Mayo 2020

    UNOAU and AU representatives meeting with MINUSCA force commander Lieutenant-General Daniel Sidiki Traoré in Bangui CAR dated 12 March 2020

    ...
  • 22 Mayo 2020

    I would like to extend my heartfelt wishes to the people of Yemen on the occasion of Eid el Fitr. I wish you all health and safety.

    May the spirit of Eid guide us all to achieve sustainable...

  • 22 Mayo 2020

    KABUL - I warmly extend Eid Mubarak wishes to all Afghans on behalf of the United Nations in Afghanistan.

    We share your hopes for an...

  • 22 Mayo 2020

    New York, 22 May 2020

    This year’s message for the International Day for Biological Diversity is clear.

    ...

  • 21 Mayo 2020

    The consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic are acute for Somalia, but the Horn of Africa nation is doing what it can with the resources it has, even as it looks ahead to its first direct elections in a half-century, the top UN official in the country said on Thursday.

  • 21 Mayo 2020

    ASHGABAT, Turkmenistan

    Promoting the implementation of the United Nations Disability Inclusion Strategy, which was formally launched by the Secretary-...

  • 21 Mayo 2020

    Mr. President,

    Good evening from Mogadishu and Ramadan Mubarak to our Somali brothers and sisters as we approach the Eid-al-Fitr.

    Somalia, like the rest of the world, is focused on confronting...

  • 20 Mayo 2020

    Negotiations remain the only way to overcome the ongoing political deadlock in Venezuela, especially given the potentially far-reaching impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, a senior UN official told the Security Council on Wednesday.

  • 20 Mayo 2020

    Negotiations remain the only way to overcome the ongoing political deadlock in Venezuela, especially given the potentially far-reaching impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, a senior UN official told the Security Council on Wednesday.

  • 20 Mayo 2020

    Security Council Open VTC on Venezuela, Briefing by Under-Secretary-General Rosemary DiCarlo

     

    Thank you Mister President,

    Venezuela is mired in a deepening protracted crisis that only Venezuelans can resolve.

    Attempts at reaching a negotiated solution have been unsuccessful in spite of significant international facilitation efforts.  The path of negotiation seems to be stalled.

    In a letter to the President of the Security Council, the Government of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela stated that on 3 and 4 May, and I quote, “armed groups of mercenaries and terrorists, organized, trained, financed and protected by the Governments of the Republic of Colombia and the United States of America, illegally entered the Venezuelan territory,” unquote. According to the letter, the “declared objective” was “perpetrating criminal acts” against the Venezuelan people and “[to] carry out selective assassinations of high officials of [the] Government”, including President Nicolás Maduro.

    The letter pointed to the involvement in the operation of an “extremist sector of the Venezuelan opposition”, referring explicitly to “Deputy Juan Guaidó”, who is recognized by a group of Member States as the “interim president”. According to the letter, the operation was “frustrated by the Venezuelan authorities” and, as of 13 May, the Prosecutor General of Venezuela had confirmed the arrest of 47 people in relation to the operation.  

    The Governments of Colombia and the United States have rejected allegations by the Venezuelan Government regarding their involvement. The leader of the Venezuelan opposition has also denied involvement in the operation and called for establishing a “national emergency government.”

     

    Mister President,

    On 4 May, through his Spokesperson, the Secretary-General affirmed that “we stand against any escalation of the situation in Venezuela” – and that “the way to resolve the situation is through political dialogue, as well as full respect for human rights.”

    There is heightened concern regarding the stand-off and the absence of any serious negotiations between the main political parties in Venezuela, especially amid the potentially far-reaching effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Until restrictions imposed by the pandemic forced the suspension of its activities, the Applications Committee of the National Assembly, established to work on the selection of members of the National Electoral Council, was the only formal space bringing together lawmakers from the Government and the opposition.  The Committee was also significant in that it was poised to lay the groundwork for necessary agreements between the Government and the opposition over the electoral calendar and process.  Legislative elections are due before the end of the year. 

    We have taken note of the position of members of the opposition who have called for presidential elections to take place together with legislative elections.

    We call on the main political actors to engage in a constructive negotiation to create conditions conducive to the holding of credible, inclusive and participatory elections.

     

    Mister President,

    In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, the General Assembly has called for a global response based on unity, solidarity and multilateral cooperation.  The UN’s COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan includes Venezuela. 

    The 2020 Plan is expected to request some $750 million to cover humanitarian needs of the most vulnerable Venezuelans and support the response to the pandemic. More funding is urgently needed.

    The Government of Venezuela has been calling for “a humanitarian agreement for health and peace among all political sectors”.

    While such calls are welcome, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights has received reports of detentions of political leaders and journalists reporting on COVID-19 and threats and intimidation against health workers for expressing, for example, concern about the lack of equipment to fight the pandemic or for giving information on the number of cases.

    The High Commissioner for Human Rights has expressed concern about the excessive use of force in some countries, including Venezuela, in the context of protests for access to basic rights – such as food, water and medicine.

    Politicization of humanitarian aid in Venezuela has continued during the pandemic and remains a major concern. Humanitarian aid provided by the United Nations and our partners across the country is governed by the principles of independence, humanity, neutrality and impartiality.

    Mark Lowcock, the United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator has asked all parties to respect this principled humanitarian approach and not manipulate the needs-based assistance.

    Another concern is the nationwide fuel shortages, a key operational constraint for humanitarian organizations trying to sustain their response. The Venezuelan Government attributes the fuel shortages to unilateral sanctions.  While available social and economic indicators show that the economic crisis predates the imposition of economic sanctions, the measures are exacerbating an already critical situation.

     

    Mister President,

    In his address to the G20 on 26 March, the Secretary-General appealed for the waiving of sanctions that could undermine countries’ capacity to respond to the pandemic.

    And in her update on Venezuela to the Human Rights Council on 10 March, the High Commissioner noted that “despite exceptions to allow imports of medicines, food and humanitarian supplies, public services and the general population continue to suffer from the impact of over-compliance from the financial sector.”  In the context of the pandemic, she has recently affirmed that “humanitarian exemptions to sanctions measures should be given broad and practical effect”.

     

    Mister President,

    The UN system will continue strengthening its human rights and humanitarian action in Venezuela as well as its response in support of Venezuelan refugees and migrants outside the country. 

    According to official figures, as of early May, close to 5.1 million refugees and migrants have left Venezuela. More than 80 per cent of this population can be found across countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Since the start of the pandemic, there are reports of Venezuelans returning to their country due to the loss of livelihoods. 

    Eduardo Stein, the Joint UNHCR-IOM Special Representative for Venezuelan refugees and migrants, has said that “the pandemic exposes them to even greater hardship as many are now struggling to survive, away from home.” He urged the international community “to generously provide support” through the regional response plan for Venezuelans, which to date has only 4 per cent of the required funds.

    In a statement on 15 May, the European Union and the Spanish Government announced plans to convene an “International Donors Conference in solidarity with Venezuelan refugees and migrants in Latin American countries”.  The conference will take place on 26 May and will be supported by the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the International Organisation for Migration (IOM).

     

    Mister President,

    The Secretary-General has repeatedly called for a negotiated solution among Venezuelans. He has supported international facilitation efforts and offered his good offices as well, if needed and the parties request them. We remain convinced that a real negotiation among Venezuela’s main political actors is the only way forward.  In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, an agreement that strengthens democratic governance, with full respect for human rights and the rule of law is more urgent than ever.

    We therefore call on all main political actors to resume serious negotiations.

    And we urge all Member States to stand behind this call.

    Thank you.

     

  • 20 Mayo 2020

    New York, 21 May 2020

    Today the United Nations is launching “Verified”, an initiative to combat the growing scourge of COVID-19 misinformation by increasing the volume and reach of trusted, accurate information.

    “We cannot cede our virtual spaces to those who traffic in lies, fear and hate,” said United Nations Secretary-...

  • 20 Mayo 2020

    The UN’s Middle East peace envoy issued a stern warning on Wednesday against any unilateral action – including an Israeli annexation of parts of the West Bank – that could undermine diplomatic efforts to get Israelis and Palestinians back to the negotiating table.

  • 20 Mayo 2020

    “Will COVID-19 Exacerbate or Defuse Conflicts in the Middle East?”  - Online Event by the Atlantic Council, Opening Remarks by Rosemary A. DiCarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs  

     

    Thank you for the opportunity to take part in this timely discussion about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Middle East conflicts.

    Let me preface my remarks by stressing that, even before the pandemic, the global environment for conflict resolution was already extremely challenging. The Middle East and North Africa region provides ample evidence of that reality. Turmoil and instability have long wracked many MENA states. Violent conflicts have drawn in regional and global powers and actors, displaced millions and collapsed state and local institutions. Mass protests rocked Lebanon, Iraq and Iran just last year as citizens rose up demanding reforms.

    And COVID-19 has only made matters worse.

    This is why, UN Secretary-General António Guterres called for a global ceasefire so that all efforts could be aimed at fighting the pandemic. He did so to facilitate the provision of humanitarian assistance and create space for diplomatic engagement. His call has resonated around the world: 115 Member States have endorsed his appeal, as have regional organizations, civil society, religious leaders and 24 armed groups. And our UN Middle East envoys have followed the Secretary-Genera’s appeal with a call of their own aimed specifically at the conflicts in the Middle East.

    But regrettably, this impressive groundswell of support has not yet translated into positive change on the ground, in the Middle East or elsewhere.

    In Yemen, despite the announcement of a unilateral ceasefire by Saudi Arabia on behalf of the Coalition the fighting is ongoing.

    In Syria, cease-fire agreements remain fragmented and fragile. Humanitarian coordination and supply across frontlines remains insufficient, underlining the need for continued and expanded cross-border assistance. And progress on the UN-led political process remains elusive, despite our efforts. 

    In Libya, where the parties have called for humanitarian truces at various times in the past, the conflict has intensified.

    Now, we knew that turning the global ceasefire call into tangible gains on the ground was not going to be easy. We knew it would require great political will and commitment from the conflict parties, first and foremost. And we knew that the appeal required broader international support, especially from those backing conflict parties, politically or with weapons. If we are to see a positive effect on violence, those with influence on combatants must exercise that pull.

    Regrettably, at the apex of multilateral diplomacy on peace and security – the UN Security Council – there is still no unified position in response to COVID-19 and its impact on conflict.

    The Secretary-General and our UN envoys and special representatives continue to exercise good offices and cajole and support conflict parties in pursuit of dialogue and cooperation. These efforts now rely mostly on the use of secure digital tools and platforms. 

    In Libya, for example, working groups established in Berlin have met remotely. In Yemen, our Special Envoy is making a concerted effort to expand the space for political talks, including a national ceasefire, through remote and in person meetings.  In Syria, while the next meeting of the Constitutional Committee remains pending, the Special Envoy has engaged civil society and the Syrian Women’s Advisory Board virtually to harness initiatives for confidence building.

    Although we recognize that the limitations of processes in which face-to-face meetings are restricted, the increased use of technology has the potential to create new opportunities, enhance the inclusivity of peace processes, for example, including the participation of women and young people.

    Let me outline what I perceive as some of key risks and challenges for our conflict prevention and resolution efforts as we go forward.

    One is the destabilizing effects of the economic fallout of the pandemic, which can lead to civil unrest and violence. As the countries slowly lurch back to life from weeks of lockdown, the demands for economic recovery may grow beyond the capacity of many states. The rate of unemployment is skyrocketing. And the decline in oil and gas prices is further straining national finances. We have already witnessed protests, some violent, in Lebanon – dubbed by protestors as a “hunger revolution” – and also Iraq, against a coronavirus curfew.

    Also the risk of serious human rights violations and shrinking civic space increase under the guise of fighting the pandemic. We have seen discrimination in accessing health services, increased cases of domestic violence and an overall disproportionate impact on women and female-headed households. Refugees and internally displaced persons as well as detainees and abductees, many living in crowded and squalid conditions, have been particularly vulnerable. Migrant workers in the Persian Gulf have faced growing pressure to return home. They are most vulnerable to high prices and food shortages. Migrants have limited access to healthcare and face crowded living conditions.

    Also, the threat of terrorism remains alive. Terrorist groups may see a window of opportunity to strike while the attention of most governments is turned towards the pandemic. There are reports that ISIL has tried to exploit the pandemic in Iraq and elsewhere, launching new initiatives and intensifying propaganda.

    Moreover, actors in conflict settings could exploit the confusion created by the virus to press their advantage leading to greater escalation of violence and further complicating efforts of peaceful resolution. 

    But despite these risks, the pandemic has also been a catalyst for much needed cooperation and dialogue.  There are encouraging examples of this in the Middle East:

    Israel and the Palestinian Authority are coordinating their efforts, with UN support, on tackling the common threat posed by the pandemic. While we are encouraged that the COVID-19 crisis has created new opportunities for cooperation, the dangerous prospect of annexation by Israel of parts of the occupied West Bank, casts a darker cloud on the peace process. And the Palestinian leadership’s harsh reaction to such steps, by declaring an end to all cooperation with Israel yesterday, adds to these concerns. We continue to strongly urge Israeli and Palestinian leaders to build on recent cooperation, reject unilateral moves and take steps towards peace.

    In the Persian Gulf region, the UAE, Kuwait, Oman and Qatar have provided much-needed medical equipment and humanitarian assistance to Iran. And Qatar has facilitated the transportation of stranded Gulf Cooperation Council citizens back to their home countries.

    However, the pandemic does not seem to be the olive branch it could have been for overcoming political differences and poisonous divisions among the Persian Gulf countries.

    Prior to this pandemic, the Secretary-General had underscored the urgent need for effective crisis management systems and lines of communication in the Persian Gulf region. That need is much greater now than ever before. Any miscalculation in the current atmosphere can lead to consequences that could overwhelm the mechanisms that are currently in place.

    Let me close by stating the obvious: There is no good time for a pandemic.

    But COVID-19 hit at a particularly difficult moment. The international community and the rules-based order built after WWII are under attack as never before, and great-power rivalry is intensifying. The global cooperation and solidarity that are essential to facing threats like the pandemic comprehensively cannot be taken for granted. The novel coronavirus does present an opportunity to make progress in peace and security, even in the Middle East. But it could also push multilateral efforts closer to the edge.

    I think we will overcome COVID-19, I believe so, but though obviously it will not be unscathed. It will take a lot of vigilance and hard work, at the UN, between individual states or groups of countries, in civil society, among many of you. But we have a chance to go beyond recovery. We can safeguard the progress achieved over the last 75 years that helped societies prevent, resolve and rebuild from violent conflict. But we can do more. We must build back better.

    Thank you.
      

  • 20 Mayo 2020

    New York, 20 May 2020

    As COVID-19 spreads across the continent, Africa has responded swiftly to the pandemic, and as of now reported cases are lower than feared.  Even so, much hangs in the balance. 

    In recent years Africans have done much to advance the well-being of the continent’s people.  Economic growth has been strong.  The digital revolution has taken hold.  A free trade area has been agreed. ...

  • 20 Mayo 2020

    New York, 20 May 2020

    As COVID-19 spreads across the continent, Africa has responded swiftly to the pandemic, and as of now reported cases are lower than feared.  Even so, much hangs in the balance. 

    In recent years Africans have done much to advance the well-being of the continent’s people.  Economic growth has been strong.  The digital revolution has taken hold.  A free trade area has been agreed. ...

  • 20 Mayo 2020

    The coronavirus pandemic threatens the hard-earned gains Africans have made throughout the continent, the UN chief said on Wednesday, urging the world to stand in solidarity with the people, “now, and for recovering better”.