Bienvenidos a las Naciones Unidas

Reports and Policy Documents

2019

  • 25 Oct 2019

    Updating the Security Council on the situation in the Central African Republic (CAR) on Friday, the head of the UN Mission in the country, MINUSCA, called on the country’s friends and partners, including the Council, to “transform the dreams of peace, prosperity and development of millions of Central Africans into a lasting reality”.

  • 25 Oct 2019

    Protests in cities across the world in recent days show that “people are hurting and want to be heard” by political leaders who must now address a “growing deficit of trust”, said the UN chief on Friday. 

  • 25 Oct 2019

    I am honoured to greet this 18th Summit of Heads and State and Government of the Non-Aligned Movement.  I congratulate Azerbaijan on assuming the chairmanship of NAM and look forward to working together. 

    The Non-Aligned Movement has made immense contributions to the work of the United Nations.  NAM members represent two-thirds of the UN membership and contribute 80 per cent of UN peacekeepers.  Through the years, the concerns and views of Non-Aligned Movement countries have shaped our agenda, from peace and security to sustainable development and human rights.

    You gather at a time of unease and uncertainty around the world.  A great many people are losing faith in a process of globalization that is leaving them behind. We see a growing deficit of trust in governments, political establishments, government and the media, and the rising appeal of nationalist and populist voices.  

    At the same time, we are witnessing the multiplication of conflicts that are increasingly interlinked, and which are also intertwined with the newer threats of global terrorism and international criminality.

    Over the decades, international cooperation has saved lives, advanced human rights, prevented conflicts, and expanded economic and social progress.

    Yet across the world today, we are seeing greater scepticism about multilateralism and increasing calls for isolationism and closed borders.  The norms that have defined international cooperation for the last 75 years are under pressure.  We are falling short in the face of unresolved conflicts, runaway climate change, widening inequalities and other threats.  

    We face a paradox: global challenges are more connected, but our responses are growing more fragmented.  This is very dangerous at a time when collective action is essential.

    But it is not enough to proclaim the virtue of multilateralism.  We must prove the value of international cooperation by addressing the real problems people face, and doing so in a way that they understand and in which they can participate.

    We need a networked multilateralism, with close cooperation among international and regional organizations, and important groups such as the NAM.

    We also need to work towards an inclusive multilateralism, with strong partnerships with parliaments, the business community, civil society, academics and others.

    I applaud your long-standing focus on the challenge of disarmament and non-proliferation.  I have put forward a new disarmament agenda to advance global peace.  The United Nations will continue working with Member States to make progress, including in the context of the 2020 Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, the cornerstone of the disarmament and non-proliferation regime.

    Let us never forget that development is critical for stable and prosperous societies.  It is also a fundamental instrument for conflict prevention.  We have a vital tool for addressing some of the roots of instability: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, our shared blueprint for a fair globalization.

    Yet four years since the Agenda’s adoption, we are far from where we need to be – in reducing inequality, in addressing the climate crisis, in tackling global hunger, in achieving gender equality and in expanding opportunity for young people. We must step up our efforts with greater ambition and financing.

    We also know how climate change is an accelerator of insecurity.  As we have seen in the Sahel region and elsewhere, the competition for resources is often an additional factor of instability.  It is no coincidence that the countries most vulnerable to climate change are often those most vulnerable to conflict and fragility.

    If our world is to avoid the climate cliff, we must build on the achievements of last month’s Climate Action Summit, heed the call of science and cut greenhouse emissions by 45 percent by 2030, reach carbon neutrality by 2050 and limit temperature rise to 1.5 degrees by the end of the century. 

    Finally, in all we do, the initiative, energy and ideas of young people will be critical.  I commend your efforts to expand opportunities for youth and engage them as partners in preventing conflict, sustaining peace and ensuring justice.

    As the movement towards a multipolar world continues, strong multilateral institutions are ever more critical.

    Let us pledge to keep working to reap the benefits of multilateralism – particularly as a central vehicle to maintain international peace and security, foster friendly relations among states and ensure human dignity for all.

    Thank you.

     

  • 25 Oct 2019

    At the end of his two-day visit, President of the UN Peacebuilding Commission - Guinea-Bissau Configuration Mauro Vieira said he was confident that the elections would take place on 24 November in a fair, peaceful and...

  • 25 Oct 2019

    UN Photo

    The Special Envoy of the UN Secretary-General for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, met with the Deputy Minister of Defense Prince Khalid bin Salman in Riyadh yesterday. They discussed ways to support...

  • 25 Oct 2019

    Nukus, Karakalpakstan/Uzbekistan

    On 24-25 October, SRSG Natalia Gherman represented the Secretary-General of the United Nations at the...

  • 24 Oct 2019

    Mr. President,

    As you have heard the UN say many times before, the security situation in Syria remains extremely volatile. Nevertheless, over the past weeks, we have seen an encouraging surge of diplomatic activity on the northeast, though some uncertainties remain. 

    On 17 October, Turkey and the United States announced agreement on a 120 hour pause in Turkey’s operation in order to, and I quote, “allow the withdrawal of YPG from the safe zone,” end of quote.

    On Tuesday, 22 October, the Presidents of Turkey and the Russian Federation reiterated, and I quote, “their commitment to the preservation of the political unity and territorial integrity of Syria and the protection of national security of Turkey,” end of quote.

    They decided to preserve the “status quo in the current Operation Peace Spring area covering Tel Abyad and Ras al Ayn with a depth of 32 km”. They also decided that Russian military police and Syrian border guards would enter areas east and west of Tel Abyad and Ras al Ayn, in order “to facilitate the removal of YPG elements and their weapons to the depth of 30 km from the Turkish-Syrian border.” The UN takes note of these agreements and welcomes any efforts to de-escalate the situation in line with the UN Charter and to protect civilians in accordance with international humanitarian law. The UN also takes note of Turkey’s announcement that “at this stage, there is no further need to conduct a new operation outside the present operation area.”

    The Memorandum of Understanding of 22 October between Turkey and Russia also indicated that “joint efforts will be launched to facilitate the return of refugees in a safe and voluntary manner”. The President of Turkey previously stated that the “main aim of [Turkey’s] operation is to […] facilitate the return of Syrian refugees”. He emphasized that up to two million refugees could be resettled in the area.


    Mr. President

    I would like to reiterate our concern about the humanitarian impact of military operations in northern Syria since Turkey and allied Syrian opposition groups began “Operation Peace Spring” on 9 October. While violence has subsided since 20 October, when the Syrian Democratic Forces withdrew from Ras al Ayn, the situation remains in flux. Civilians in northeast Syria continue to express concerns amid continued uncertainty as to what may lie ahead. Many are reminded of what occurred previously in Afrin and fear further displacement from major cities and towns and the disruption of humanitarian access. Many civilians also fear potential consequences of a possible return of government forces. This includes fears of arbitrary detention, violent political retribution and imposition of conscription.

    We cannot stress enough that civilians including captured fighters, must be protected under international human rights and international humanitarian law. It is crucial that the Security Council and all Member States present in this chamber to do everything in their power to protect civilians and civilian infrastructure, to ensure full and unimpeded humanitarian access, and to help the parties resolve their security concerns through peaceful means.


    Mr. President,

    We recognize Turkey’s and other neighbouring countries’ generosity in hosting so many refugees fleeing Syria’s devastating conflict. We urge the international community to provide strengthened support to Syria’s neighboring countries in shouldering this burden. It is also important to stress that refugee returns must be voluntary, safe, dignified and well informed.


    Mr. President,

    Let me also highlight the situation in al Hol and Roj camps in northeast Syria. Some 70,000 civilians, more than 95 per cent of them women and children, are currently sheltered in the camps. Most have been exposed to violence and trauma under ISIL. They are now living in extremely difficult conditions where they face a range of challenges, and an uncertain and disconcerting fate. This includes the risk of being denied repatriation, rehabilitation and reintegration or a fair trial.

    All children, including those suspected of being associated with armed groups, are entitled to special care and protection under international humanitarian law and international human rights law, including the Convention on the Rights of the Child. They must be treated first and foremost as victims. Solutions for foreign nationals need to be urgently found. We call on all Member States to take all measures necessary to ensure that their nationals are repatriated for the purposes of prosecution, rehabilitation and/or reintegration, as appropriate, and in line with international law and standards.


    Mr. President,

    I would also like to briefly update you on the situation in the greater Idlib area. Following the announcement of a ceasefire in late August, there was a marked reduction in air strikes, although heavy ground-based artillery shelling continued to be reported. Unfortunately, air strikes are reported to have increased again since 12 October. There have also been reports of helicopter attacks and the use of barrel bombs. We count on all parties, especially Turkey and the Russian Federation, as guarantors of the de-escalation agreement, to press all parties to the full implementation of the September 2018 Memorandum of Understanding. As the Secretary-General has said many times before, any large-scale military offensive in Idlib would come at an unacceptable cost in terms of loss of human lives and suffering.


    Mr. President,

    We appreciate this Council’s full support that has helped us continue to chart a political path forward on implementation of resolution 2254. The launch of the Syrian-led and Syrian-owned Constitutional Committee will be facilitated by the United Nations in Geneva later this month.

    Resolution 2254 called for a nationwide ceasefire, reaffirmed the sovereignty, independence, unity and territorial integrity of Syria, and stressed that the only sustainable solution to the current conflict in Syria is through an inclusive and Syrian-led political process that meets the legitimate aspirations of the Syrian people.

    The need to implement resolution 2254 has been reaffirmed by this Council repeatedly, most recently in your presidential statement of 8 October. What is most urgently needed now is decisive action for a consolidation of the ceasefires in northeast and northwest Syria, the protection of civilians throughout the country, and full support to ensure that the political track remains on course.

    Thank you.

  • 24 Oct 2019

    The United Nations welcomes efforts to de-escalate the crisis in northeastern Syria in the wake of Turkey’s incursion in the region, a senior official with responsibility for the region told the Security Council on Thursday.

  • 24 Oct 2019

    THE SECRETARY-GENERAL

    --

    FULL TRANSCRIPT OF PRESS ENCOUNTER

    New York, 25...

  • 24 Oct 2019

    NEW YORK - On October 24, to mark UN Day, Secretary-General António Guterres announced that next year’s commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the United Nations will feature a...

  • 24 Oct 2019

    Sudan and neighbouring South Sudan “have never been closer” to reaching a sustainable peace with each other, and their own internal armed opposition groups, the head of UN peacekeeping told the Security Council on Thursday.

  • 24 Oct 2019

    KHOROG, Tajikistan

    The United Nations Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy for Central Asia (UNRCCA) held its second cross-border...

  • 24 Oct 2019

    KHOROG, Tajikistan

    The United Nations Regional Centre for Preventive Diplomacy for Central Asia (UNRCCA) marked UN Day with guests and participants of its second cross-border workshop for young people...

  • 24 Oct 2019

    United Nations Day highlights the enduring ideals of the Charter, which entered into force on this date 74 years ago.

    Amid stormy global seas, the Charter remains our shared moral anchor. 

    ...
  • 23 Oct 2019

    New York – United Nations Day highlights the enduring ideals of the Charter, adopted on this date 74 years ago.

    Amid stormy global seas, the Charter remains our shared moral anchor.  

    At this time of turbo-charged change, the United Nations remains focused on the real problems of real people.

    We are working for a fair globalization and bold climate action.

    We are pushing for human rights and gender equality -- and saying “no” to hatred of any kind....

  • 23 Oct 2019

    Mogadishu – On a visit to the Somali capital today, a high-level delegation of United Nations and African Union officials welcomed the Horn of Africa country’s...

  • 23 Oct 2019

    Mogadishu 23 October 2019 – On a visit aiming to express her solidarity with the women of Somalia, the United Nations Deputy Secretary-General, Amina Mohammed, has called for...

  • 23 Oct 2019

    KABUL - With a special focus in 2019 on the meaningful participation of women in peace efforts, this year’s nationwide ‘Global Open Days’ events commenced...

  • 23 Oct 2019

    Somalia has made “enormous strides on its path to peace and stability”, and Somali women’s participation in peace and security efforts has “helped advance society towards an inclusive and peaceful future”, UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed said on Wednesday.

  • 23 Oct 2019

    PRESS STATEMENT 22/2019

    Mogadishu – On a visit to the Somali capital today, a high-level delegation of United Nations and African Union officials...

  • 22 Oct 2019

    A recap of Tuesday’s main stories: Syria's northeast sees 180,000 displaced two weeks into fighting; funding shortfalls puts millions of young lives on the line; assistance breakthrough for Yemeni's; UN health agency urges ban on lead paint; Libyan child deaths in Tripoli attack.

  • 22 Oct 2019

    Report on progress achieved in the delivery of its mandate in the period between July and September 2019.

  • 22 Oct 2019

    The United Nations Integrated Office in Haiti (BINUH) started its work on 16 October 2019. BINUH is mandated to advise the Government of Haiti in the promotion and strengthening of political stability and good governance, including the rule of law. The Mission works to preserve and advance a peaceful and stable environment, including through supporting an inclusive inter-Haitian national dialogue, and protect and promote human rights. Through Security Council resolutions 2645 (2022) and 2692 (2023), BINUH is also mandated to address sexual and gender-based violence through women’s protection advisers, and child protection as a cross-cutting issue throughout its mandate by assisting authorities in the protection of children.

     

    Overall, the Mission’s efforts are in support of the Haitian long term development objectives integrated with those of the 19 entities of the United Nations Country Team, which deliver humanitarian assistance and implement development programmes under the leadership of national authorities.

     

    The Security Council established BINUH, which operates under chapter VI of the United Nations Charter, through resolution 2476 of 25 June 2019.

  • 22 Oct 2019

    After nearly two weeks of fighting in northeast Syria, the UN’s humanitarian wing has estimated that around 180,000 have been forced to leave their homes or shelters, including 80,000 children, all in desperate need of humanitarian assistance.

  • 22 Oct 2019

    HERAT - A free and independent press is crucial for promoting peace and the respect for human rights, stressed participants in a UN-backed event that was later broadcast by television to audiences...

  • 21 Oct 2019

    First, thank you to the Permanent Mission of the UAE and the Georgetown Institute for organizing today’s event.

    A growing body of research has shown that women’s effective political participation is fundamental to building stronger and more resilient societies.

    Indeed, the United Nations has recognized that successful efforts to rebuild from conflict in just and inclusive ways are fundamental to preventing a return to conflict, breaking the cycle of violence, and achieving sustainable peace.

    But achieving sustainable peace requires political will, effort and investment.

    For its part, the United Nations has undertaken significant institutional reform to bring together its peace and security, sustainable development and human rights work to meet the challenges of sustaining peace.

    This includes scaling-up our efforts to promote women’s participation in prevention, peace processes, governance and decision-making.

    So, what are the strategies to ensure women’s participation in post-conflict life?

     

    1. First, during peace talks, women must be at the negotiating table when possible and always provided the support to engage meaningfully. Put simply, there is no substitute for direct participation.

    It is for this reason that in UN-facilitated political process for Syria, the UN has been working to ensure women’s direct participation by:

    • encouraging the Government and opposition to strengthen women’s representation on their own delegations;
    • receiving advice on all aspects of the mediation process from the Syrian Women’s Advisory Board; and
    • ensuring women’s effective representation from the outset on the recently-agreed Constitutional committee.

     

    1. Second, we know from experience that if women are not included from the outset of any decision-making process, their inclusion rarely improves over time. Early planning based on gender-sensitive conflict and political analysis must inform all peace and security interventions including post-conflict planning.

    To strengthen our efforts in this regard, a few months ago I issued a new DPPA Women, Peace and Security Policy to ensure women’s meaningful participation and gender-sensitive analysis are integrated into all our work.

     

    1. Third, legislative and policy protections are needed to support women’s rights, remove discriminatory laws and promote gender equality.

    In Somalia, the UN Peacebuilding Fund has supported efforts by the federal and regional governments and women’s civil society to integrate gender equality in policy and legal frameworks, including the introduction of a new Gender Policy. Meanwhile, Iraq was the first country in the Middle East to adopt a National Action Plan on Security Council resolution 1325 (2000) on women, peace and security, and has also adopted an implementation plan on preventing and responding to conflict related sexual violence.

     

    1. Fourth, electoral reforms should be prioritized to enable and embed women’s safe political participation as voters and candidates, and to strengthen the credibility, inclusiveness and transparency of elections.

    The UN has supported women’s electoral participation in many countries including Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya and Somalia. This includes by assisting national efforts to develop or reform electoral laws to provide better chances for women to participate in public life; and providing technical advice on temporary special measures, such as quotas in electoral laws, as well as voter registration, electoral security, awareness raising and voter sensitization. In Somalia, such efforts saw an increase in women’s representation in parliament from 14 percent in 2012 to 24 percent in 2016.

     

    1. Fifth, inclusive approaches must be prioritized, with women – including women’s civil society – engaged in setting peacebuilding priorities.

    In Liberia, where women were at the forefront of peace efforts to end the civil war, the Peacebuilding Fund has established multi-stakeholder platforms to enable local communities – including women – to engage with companies and government representatives, empowering women to exercise greater voice in demanding their rights.

    In Iraq, the UN Assistance Mission earlier this year established the Women’s Advisory Group on Reconciliation and Politics to enable women leaders to act as a source of independent expertise and advice. The Women’s Advisory Group has the potential to greatly contribute to the gender-inclusive rebuilding by allowing women leaders, the international community, political actors, the legislature and civil society to engage in dialogue, identify entry points, and advocate for measures to enable the meaningful participation of women in decision-making processes in Iraq.

     

    1. Sixth, the international community must put its weight behind supporting national and grassroots-level peacebuilding priorities.

    In Sudan, where women played a prominent role in protests leading to the ouster of the former President, the new transitional government has committed to enhancing women’s participation and included two women on the 11-member Sovereign Council, four women Ministers in the new Cabinet [out of 18], among them Asmaa Abdallah, Sudan’s first woman Foreign Minister, and just last week swore in Sudan’s first woman Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. It has also promised to ensure a minimum of 40 percent women’s representation in the Legislative Council. The UN has committed to supporting the transitional Government in these efforts.

    In Liberia, the PBF has supported 12 women-led peace huts as local dispute resolution venues and rehabilitation efforts for marginalized youth in Monrovia improving young women and men’s access to agricultural employment in conflict-prone rural counties. It has also funded women filmmakers to document the role of women in the Liberia peace process, which will help to share lessons learned with women all over world.

     

    1. And finally,  these priorities need to be adequately, predictably and sustainably financed.

    Since 2015, the UN’s Peacebuilding Fund has exceeded the Secretary-General’s 15 percent target for gender-responsive peacebuilding, and the PBF’s own target of 30 percent. In 2018, 40 percent of its funding was allocated towards gender equality and women’s empowerment.

    DPPA’s new Women, Peace and Security policy also comes with a commitment to provide resources in support of its implementation.

    And the new PBF investment plan for 2020-2024 is based on the recognition of the importance of women’s inclusion to sustaining peace and allocates a growing share of the portfolio to the gender dimensions of the SDGs, including support for women’s participation in political, economic and social life.

    Of course, many challenges remain.

    In Iraq, women’s participation in national-level decision making positions remains limited with no women ministers currently appointed to the federal cabinet.

    In Somalia, UN advocacy led to the introduction of a 30 per cent parliamentary quota for women for the 2016/17 election. Twenty-four  per cent was achieved – a marked improvement on previous results -- but still short of the quota set.

    Meanwhile, in Sudan, long-standing structural discrimination will have to be addressed to durably increase women’s participation in political and reconstruction processes. This will take time, support and ongoing advocacy.

    Meaningfully improving women’s participation in post-conflict governance and reconstruction requires a long-term and sustained approach. The indispensable role of women must be seen not only as a rights or equality issue, but as a peace and security priority.

    The UN is committed to supporting Member States rebuilding their societies and governance and to ensuring that women are afforded their rightful place in shaping national values, ideals and priorities .

  • 21 Oct 2019

    Prime Minister Saad Hariri received today at Grand Serail the members of the International Support Group (ISG). Ambassadors representing France, Germany, Italy, the...

  • 21 Oct 2019

    A recap of Monday’s main stories: companies ‘failing’ to address offline harm incited by online hate; gender equality ‘precursor’ to sustaining peace; UN rights chief urges ‘immediate dialogue’ to resolve Chile crisis; African migrants would make perilous Europe journey again; Security Council visits South Sudan. 

  • 21 Oct 2019

    In a visit to South Sudan this past weekend, members of the UN Security Council urged leaders to expedite implementation of a 2018 peace agreement aimed at ending six years of ongoing conflict.

  • 21 Oct 2019

    The top UN human rights official is calling for politicians and civil society in Chile to engage in “immediate dialogue” to resolve the deadly crisis which has gripped the nation in recent days.

  • 21 Oct 2019

    9th Meeting of the Steering Committee of the United Nations Integrated Strategy for the...

  • 20 Oct 2019

    NEW YORK - The members of the Security Council condemned in the strongest terms the heinous and cowardly terrorist attack that took place inside a mosque in the Haska Mena district in Nangarhar province,...

  • 20 Oct 2019

    KABUL - The UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) condemns the attack that took place Friday at a mosque in Nangarhar’s Deh Balah district, killing and injuring more than 100...

  • 19 Oct 2019

    Tensions around global trade and technology continue to rise and the international community needs to “do everything possible” to prevent the world being split into two competing spheres, led by the United States and China. 

  • 18 Oct 2019


     

    12 - 18 October 2019

    This Week in DPPA is a brief roundup of political and peacebuilding events and developments at UNHQ and around the world.

     

    New York

    More needed to increase women’s participation in political and electoral processes, DiCarlo tells General Assembly rights panel
    Under-Secretary-General Rosemary DiCarlo introduced the latest Secretary-General’s report “Strengthening the Role of the United Nations in Enhancing the Effectiveness of the Principle of Periodic and Genuine Elections and the Promotion of Democratization” at the General Assembly’s Third Committee on 14 October. During her opening remarks, she stressed that the increase of women’s political participation and representation is encouraging, but clearly more needs to be done. “Supporting the efforts of Member States in promoting women’s participation in political and electoral processes therefore remains one of the highest priorities of the Organization.”
    Full remarks here.

     

    Preparing roadmap for 2020 review of UN peacebuilding architecture
    The Peacebuilding Support Office (PBSO) and the Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation convened an informal retreat on 15 and 16 October to prepare a roadmap for next year’s review of the UN peacebuilding architecture. Twin resolutions of the Security Council and the General Assembly in 2016 had called for a comprehensive review in 2020. Members of the Peacebuilding Commission (PBC), including countries who have engaged with the PBC, senior UN officials and the co-facilitators of the 2010 and 2015 review processes, were invited to the retreat to identify critical themes and issues to shape the review of the peacebuilding architectures.
    For more information, contact DPPA

     

    Security Council

    Griffiths: “Signs of hopes for the people of Yemen”
    Martin Griffiths, Special Envoy for Yemen, briefed the Council on 17 October on the latest developments in that country. He said there were signs of hopes for the people of Yemen – among others, the seeming progress achieved in talks between the Government of Yemen and the Southern Transitional Council, the recent reduction of violence in the north and the freeing of detainees. "At the same time let’s be under no illusion about the challenges and the difficulties ahead," he cautioned.
    Full remarks here.

    Khaled Khiari, Assistant Secretary-General for Middle East, Asia and the Pacific, briefed the Council in closed session on the situation in northeast Syria on 15 October, while and Under-Secretary-General DiCarlo briefed on Libya on 16 October and on Resolution 1559 on Lebanon’s sovereignty, territorial integrity, unity and political independence, on 18 October. Both those sessions also took place behind closed doors.
    For more information, contact DPPA.

     

    Syria

    Special Envoy holds talks in Riyadh and Damascus
    Special Envoy for Syria Geir Pedersen held meetings with the opposition Syria Negotiation Commission in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on 12 and 13 October. On 16 October, he met with Deputy Prime Minister, Foreign and Expatriates Minister Walid al-Muallem in Damascus to discuss the situation in northeastern Syria and the launching of the Constitutional Committee. “The discussions that I have had here in Damascus and with the opposition in Riyadh have been very good when it comes to launching the Constitutional Committee, and of course this is hopefully then can be a door-opener, as I said many times, to a broader political process,” Mr Pedersen told the press in Damascus.
    Read more from the press stakeout here

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


     

    Colombia

    Former FARC combatants and their families enjoy professional football match
    A group of 40 former FARC combatants, 20 of their relatives and 20 residents of the community of Llano Grande, Dabeiba, for the first time, on 13 October, experienced a Colombian professional league match - Atlético Nacional vs Águilas Doradas de Rionegro - with some 24,000 other spectators at the Atanasio Girardot Stadium in Medellín city. "Before the signing of the agreement, we managed to listen to the matches on a small radio and I always imagined what a stadium would look like,” said Óscar López Tuberquia, former FARC combatant. This visit was made possible by a group of young people under the slogan “To the football court for the first time” with the support of the Reintegration and Normalization Agency, the Mayor's Office of Medellín, Proantioquia, UNDP, the Governor's Office of Antioquia, and the UN Verification Mission in Colombia.
    Read the full story in Spanish.

     

    Truth Commission, UN, and Caritas Colombiana promote social dialogue to strengthen peace process
    More than 80 people participated on 15 October in a forum at the reintegration area of Tierra Grata, in the municipality of La Paz, Cesar, Colombia to reinforce the commitment of ex-combatants to remain in the reintegration process and to evaluate the progress on the commitments made after the signing of the Peace Agreement. During the debate between ex-combatants, victims of the conflict, representatives of the Truth Commission, Pastoral Social Caritas Colombiana, and the UN Verification Mission in Colombia the future of the peace process and the contributions that can be made from society were discussed. Carlos Ruiz-Massieu, head of the UN Verification Mission, participated in this “commitment to peace” dialogue. The event concluded with a symbolic act of reconciliation.

     

    Haiti

    New Special Political Mission starts work in Haiti
    The United Nations Integrated Office in Haiti (BINUH) started its operations on 16 October, following the closing of the UN Mission for Justice Support in Haiti (MINUJUSTH). BINUH will work in an advisory capacity with Haitian authorities and the UN Country Team to further the consolidation of the stability, security, governance, rule of law, and human rights gains achieved since 2004.
    For more information, visit BINUH’s website.

     

    Niger

    Peacebuilding Fund partners visit Niger
    To see the context and impact of the UN Peacebuilding Fund (PBF)’s support up close, a group of PBF partners undertook visits to several regions in Niger on 15 October. Representatives of the European Union, Germany, the United Kingdom, Estonia, France, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway and Sweden; two members of the PBF Advisory Group; the Director-General for international development cooperation of Sweden, and the Director of the Clingendael Conflict Research Unit made up the mission. They met with the Government, beneficiaries, civil society organizations, and the UN System to discuss the PBF's focus, results and current challenges, including major conflict drivers and limited access to resources due to climate change. 
    For more information, contact DPPA.

     

     

     

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    Contact DPPA at dppa@un.org 

  • 18 Oct 2019

    A recap of Friday's main stories: Afghanistan mosque killings condemned by UN chief, Syrian civilians flee violence, thousands affected by flooding in South Sudan, UN migration agency warns of “pervasive” human trafficking in Ukraine, UN expert calls for better education to combat growing anti-Semitism.

  • 18 Oct 2019

    A recap of Friday's main stories: Afghanistan mosque killings condemned by UN chief, Syrian civilians flee violence, thousands affected by flooding in South Sudan, UN migration agency warns of “pervasive” human trafficking in Ukraine, UN expert calls for better education to combat growing anti-Semitism.

  • 18 Oct 2019

    Authorities in Egypt are being urged by the UN human rights office, OHCHR,  to immediately release scores of citizens who have been arrested in connection with recent anti-government demonstrations in several cities.

  • 18 Oct 2019

    NEW YORK - The Secretary-General strongly condemns the 18 October attack inside a mosque during Friday prayers in Nangarhar province, eastern Afghanistan, which resulted in scores of civilians killed and dozens...

  • 18 Oct 2019

    Shelling and clashes in northern Syria on the border with Turkey continue to cause hundreds of people to flee, the UN said on Friday, despite a cessation of hostilities deal between Turkish forces and Syrian-backed Kurdish military. 

  • 17 Oct 2019

    In the light of on-going instability across Haiti and this week’s transition away from fully-fledged peacekeeping operations, the UN chief on Thursday promised “the continuous commitment” of the Organization “to support the Haitian people on their path to peace and development”.

  • 17 Oct 2019

    Despite major political developments at a national level, which have led to the establishment of a civilian-led government, the security situation in the Darfur region of Sudan remains unstable, UN peace chief Jean-Pierre Lacroix briefed the Security Council on Thursday.

  • 17 Oct 2019

    A recap of Thursday’s stories: Hope rises as violence abates in Yemen; TB infections slowdown but not fast enough; civilian casualties in Afghanistan hit record level; thousands paint picture of sustainable development in Paris; labour research finds strategies to tackle poverty.

  • 17 Oct 2019

    There are “small signs” of hope for Yemeni civilians caught up in fighting, following a reduction in violence, coupled with a 20 per cent increase in funding for the UN’s humanitarian response, the Security Council heard on Thursday.

  • 17 Oct 2019

    There are “small signs” of hope for Yemeni civilians caught up in fighting, following a reduction in violence, coupled with a 20 per cent increase in funding for the UN’s humanitarian response, the Security Council heard on Thursday.

  • 17 Oct 2019

    Afghanistan has seen record-high levels of civilian casualties in the third quarter of 2019, stemming mainly from the violence between rival political party supporters, the UN Assistance Mission in the country (UNAMA) revealed in a report published Thursday, which concluded that more must be done to protect the country’s people.

  • 17 Oct 2019

    @OSESGY

    Mr. President,

    Thank you for giving me this opportunity to brief this Council. 

    ...
  • 17 Oct 2019

     

    TRIPOLI/ 17 October, 2019 - Three months ago, Siham Sergewa, an elected member of the House of Representatives, was seized at night from her home in Benghazi. Since...

  • 17 Oct 2019

    Richard Ngatia, Chair of the ICGLR Private Sector Forum and President of the Kenya National Chamber of Commerce and Industry at the opening session of the meeting. UN Photo/Penangnini Toure

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  • 17 Oct 2019

    KABUL - Figures released today by the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) showing record-high levels of civilian casualties in the third quarter of 2019 indicate an urgent need for all...