Bienvenidos a las Naciones Unidas

Reports and Policy Documents

2019

  • 6 Nov 2019

    Greater action is needed to protect the environment during wartime if the world is to realize the goal of a more sustainable future for all people and the planet, the head of the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) warned on Wednesday.

  • 6 Nov 2019

    The Co-Chairs of the Geneva International Discussions call for the immediate re-opening of all crossing points on the administrative boundary line (ABL) with South Ossetia. Recent months have seen a serious deterioration of the security situation on the ground, which has raised fears amongst the local population. The engagement in the Ergneti Incident Prevention and Response Mechanism (IPRM) framework by all participants shows the mutual concern and commitment of all to de-escalate, which the Co-Chairs welcome. The Co-Chairs and their organizations remain actively engaged in contributing to a solution to the continuing security challenges in the Chorchana-Tsnelisi area.

    At the same time, we appeal to the relevant actors to re-open, without delay, all crossing points that have been closed since early September. While the concerns about the security situation are shared, steps to address these should be proportional and should always take humanitarian aspects into consideration. The ongoing closure of crossing points is aggravating an already difficult situation, as illustrated by recent medical cases, with a severe impact on the local conflict-affected population.

  • 6 Nov 2019

    UN Statement as delivered by the Deputy Head of Office at UNOAU and Director of Political Affairs, Mr. Gerald Mitchell at the African Union Peace and Security Council's open session on 'Living Together in Peace'.

  • 6 Nov 2019

    OSESGY Photo/Abdel Rahman Alzorgan Women peace leaders with the deputy head of mission Muin Shreim after the briefing on the latest developments in the peace process.

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  • 5 Nov 2019

    The top UN official in Yemen has welcomed an agreement to end infighting between the Government and separatist allies in the south of the country, known as the Southern Transitional Council, signed on Tuesday in Saudi Arabia.

  • 5 Nov 2019

    Current trends and public pronouncements by some political leaders in Bosnia and Herzegovina indicate an effort to roll back reforms implemented since the end of the Balkan wars two decades ago, the UN Security Council heard on Tuesday.

  • 5 Nov 2019

    At the core of peacekeeping lies the notion of shared responsibility, the UN peacekeeping chief said on Tuesday, presenting this year’s award for Female Police Officer of the Year, to a woman who “has made a career of speaking up and speaking out on behalf of all vulnerable populations”.

  • 5 Nov 2019

    Ongoing violence in Cameroon’s northwest and southwest has created a fast-growing humanitarian emergency now affecting some 1.9 million people, a “15-fold increase since 2017”, UN humanitarians said on Tuesday.

  • 5 Nov 2019

    I congratulate the Government of Yemen and the Southern Transitional Council on reaching an agreement on the way forward.

    The signing of this agreement is an important step for our collective efforts to advance a peaceful settlement to the conflict in Yemen. Listening to southern stakeholders is important to the political efforts to achieve peace in the country.

    I am grateful to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia for mediating successfully this agreement and for their...

  • 5 Nov 2019

    The Special Representative of the Secretary-general and Head of the United Nations Office for West Africa and the Sahel (UNOWAS), Mohamed Ibn Chambas, welcomes the approval of the Parity...

  • 4 Nov 2019

    It is a pleasure to be back at Yale. A few years ago, as a Senior Fellow at the Jackson Institute, I taught a course here on multilateral institutions in the 21st century. At the time I was a former official of the State Department, drawing on my experience representing the United States in multilateral fora, especially the United Nations. 

    Today I am an official of the United Nations. The department I head plays a central role in United Nations efforts to prevent deadly conflict and build sustainable peace. We have a global mandate: political missions in Afghanistan, Colombia, Iraq, Libya, Haiti and Somalia; and envoys addressing the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Syria, Yemen, Lebanon and Myanmar.  We also have envoys practicing conflict prevention at a regional level in East, West and Central Africa, and Central Asia.  We provide support to the Secretary-General in his engagements across the world and are increasingly involved in work with e countries where no formally mandated peace operation is present.

    As you can imagine, the big questions raised by the title of my remarks suffuse my work. But in the press of daily demands, it can, in all honesty, be hard to find time to think about them.  So I particularly welcome the opportunity you have given me to share some thoughts with you today.

     

    A difficult time…

    We are having this conversation at a difficult time.  Far from a “new world order”, what we see is unease and uncertainty across the globe; intensified competition amongst major powers; and a perception that we face threats more serious than we have seen in a generation:  persistent conflict, accelerating climate change, and new forms of warfare deriving from technological change and without international governance.

    In our core work of conflict prevention and resolution, we are seeing some negative trends.  Three, all intertwined, stand out:

    • Increasingly intractable conflicts: The average duration of civil wars has risen over time and is reflected in an increased average duration for our peace operations and political missions. 
    • An abundance and fragmentation of non-state armed groups: Conflicts today often feature complex and decentralized non-state armed groups with loose and fluid chains of command.  Some adopt terrorism as a deliberate tactic, targeting the UN and complicating our acceptance as an impartial actor by all sides.
    • Increased regional and international involvement.  Conflicts engaged are increasingly affected by competition for power amongst regional and other actors, as well as factors such as migration.  The priorities of influential neighbouring or international actors can directly impact our conflict resolution efforts.

    Together, these factors contribute to a sense that we have lost traction on the major conflicts; increase calls for isolationism and closed borders; and feed scepticism about multilateral efforts.  Yet, as Secretary-General António Guterres has frequently observed, this is a moment where there is arguably more need for multilateral cooperation and collective solutions to a range of problems that transcend borders and regions than at any time in the United Nations’ history. 

    How to explain, and respond to, this central paradox?

    My view is that a questioning of the relevance of multilateralism is rooted in divergence among states in their interpretation of the principles on which the UN is based, principles that have defined international cooperation for the past seven decades. This underpins a tendency to circumvent rules and leads some states to seek to redefine their roles in the multilateral system.

    When the UN was established 74 years ago, its Member States committed to the sovereign equality of all states, to refraining from the use of force and to taking collective action regarding threats to international peace and security. These principles are outlined in the UN Charter, to which all Member States pledge adherence. They were developed by the victors of the Second World War — the major powers that exist today. But there are now new and rising powers that were not part of the creation of these rules. And even those who were, interpret them differently.

    Let’s take one principle — sovereignty. To many countries, sovereignty does not mean that a state has the absolute right to do as it chooses. It also means that a state has responsibilities — not only to its citizens but to other states — not to pollute the environment, to prevent terrorists from crossing borders, to curb the flow of weapons, to abide by international human rights and humanitarian law. But to other states, sovereignty is deemed absolute. This has limited the UN’s ability to prevent and resolve conflicts in many parts of the world, including, perhaps most obviously, Syria.

    Meanwhile, many people are losing faith in the process of globalization. They feel left behind. Around the world, we see the rising appeal of nationalist and populist voices. 

    Demonstrations are affecting countries from the Middle East to Latin America and the Caribbean and from Europe to Africa and Asia. While every situation is unique, one common thread connecting all demonstrations is a growing deficit of trust between people and political establishments. This constitutes a rising threat to the social contract.

     

    Not all bad news…

    Yet not all the news is bad. Indeed, if we look back at the recent high-level week of the General Assembly, more world leaders than ever before descended on New York. The climate crisis quite rightly topped the bill in terms of their attention – and beyond states, generated an extraordinary mobilization of activists, many of them young, demanding change at the Climate Action Summit. 

    As a collective body, the General Assembly itself counters the idea that unilateralism could be the answer to the world’s problems. What we heard from a number of Member States is that many of today’s challenges cannot be addressed by one state or a few states alone.  For some issues, the way forward lies in more, not less international cooperation.  

    To quote the Secretary-General, however, “it is not enough to proclaim the virtue of multilateralism; we must prove its added value.”  And collective action must be for a defined purpose, based on principles that are commonly agreed.

     

    What to do?

    So, what does multilateralism look like in practice?  A short answer lies in one word, “partnerships”.  There is not a juxtaposition between “multilateralism versus regionalism and unilateralism”.   Multilateralism can mean a few states working togheter to solve common problems.  Or an organization like the UN working with regional organizations or international financial institutions.  But these partnerships must go beyond states and intergovernmental bodies to include civil society, the private sector, women’s organizations and youth – all of whom make an important contribution to global international cooperation.

    We are still wrestling with existing threats and challenges to security – migration, terrorism, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, arms transfers. And we have new challenges to address – the impact of climate change on security, the benefits and risks of new technology.  I think that you would all agree that not one country can solve these challenges alone.  

    Let me end here, as I am keen to hear your views, in particular, on how you see   cooperation that is needed to address today’s security challenges; and your role in helping realize it.

    Thank you.

  • 4 Nov 2019

    A recap of stories this Monday: UN reaction to US Paris Agreement withdrawal; UNICEF urges repatriation of children stranded in Syria; Public health emergency in India’s New Delhi; Ebola health worker death in DR Congo shows deadly risks; Guinea Bissau crisis, Security Council update; UNEP campaign targets ocean microplastics.

  • 4 Nov 2019

    The road ahead “will not be easy” for the Horn of Africa, UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed said on Monday, briefing the Security Council on her Joint Solidarity Mission with the African Union (AU) at the end of October. 

  • 4 Nov 2019

    The head of the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) is appealing for countries to repatriate scores of foreign children who are stranded in northeast Syria in the wake of the Turkish-launched offensive which began last month.

  • 4 Nov 2019

    Belet Weyne, 4 November 2019 – The United Nations has joined the national efforts to provide immediate assistance to tens of thousands of people affected by floods that have devastated parts of Somalia,...

  • 4 Nov 2019
  • 3 Nov 2019

    Following is UN Secretary-General António Guterres’ message for the International Day to...

  • 3 Nov 2019

    Honorable Chairman, Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen,

    First, I extend thanks to our Qatari hosts from their warm hospitality and excellent arrangements for this meeting.  I also want to express our solidarity with the Somali victims of the tragic flooding in Belet Weyne.  The United Nations family — including the Office of the Coordinator for Humanitarian Affairs and the World Food Program, among others —has responded swiftly to provide assistance, thanks to generous...

  • 3 Nov 2019

    KABUL - For the International Day to End Impunity for Crimes against Journalists, the United Nations and the Afghan Journalist...

  • 1 Nov 2019

    UN-brokered face-to-face talks between the Syrian Government and opposition – the first to take place in nearly nine years of fighting – to draft a new constitution for the country, will continue into next week, the UN’s Special Envoy for Syria, Geir Pedersen, said on Friday.

  • 1 Nov 2019

    “An inspiration to all of us” is how top Police Adviser Luis Carrilho, described this year’s winner of the UN Female Police Officer of the Year Award, which was announced on Friday.

  • 1 Nov 2019


     

    25 October - 1 November 2019

    This Week in DPPA is a brief roundup of political and peacebuilding events and developments at UNHQ and around the world.

     

    DPPA Chief in the Caucasus

    Continues visit in Azerbaijan, Georgia and Armenia
    Under-Secretary-General Rosemary DiCarlo continued her visit to the South Caucasus this week. On 26 October, Ms. DiCarlo met Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev in Baku, and reaffirmed the UN’s full support for ongoing peace efforts on Nagorno-Karabakh led by OSCE Minsk Group Co-Chairs. They also discussed the important role of women, youth and civil society in contributing to peace and development.

    In Tbilisi, Georgia, on 28 October Ms. DiCarlo met President Salome Zourabichvili, and reaffirmed the UN’s strong commitment to assisting the participants in revitalizing the Geneva International Discussions, the process that addresses the consequences of the conflict in Georgia in 2008. She also discussed with representatives from civil society and internally displaced persons progress in constitutional and electoral reforms and the important role of NGO’s and women in advancing peace through dialogue.

    Continuing to Yerevan, Armenia, the Under-Secretary-General addressed the UN “Think Equal Forum on Women Empowerment” on 29 October, highlighting alongside Armenian women leaders the essential role of women in peace and security. She also met with Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan and again emphasized the UN’s full support for the ongoing peace efforts led by the OSCE Minsk Group Co-Chairs.
    For more information, contact us

     

    Security Council

    ‘Multi-generational tragedy’ in Israel and Palestine demands political will for two-state solution, says Mladenov 
    Nickolay Mladenov, Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process, briefed the Security Council on the situation in Israel and Palestine on 28 October. “The Occupation continues, and no progress has been made in realizing a negotiated two-state solution,” Mr. Mladenov told the Council in his quarterly update. “It is a multi-generational tragedy for the peoples of this land.”
    Read his full remarks here

     

    WPS agenda one of the top priorities of the UN, Secretary-General reaffirms 
    During a Security Council open debate on Women, Peace and Security (WPS) on 29 October, Secretary-General António Guterres reaffirmed that the WPS agenda is clearly one of the top priorities of the UN as a whole. UN departments are implementing a new, stronger policy on women, peace and security, Mr. Guterres noted, while special political missions and envoys have been instructed to report regularly on their efforts to promote women’s “direct participation” throughout all stages of peace processes.
    Read his full remarks here

     

    UN–African Union collaboration more ‘systematic and predictable’
    The UN’s cooperation with the African Union to tackle peace and security issues in the continent “is becoming more systematic and predictable,” Hanna Tetteh, Special Representative and Head of UNOAU told the Security Council on 30 October.
    Watch the Council briefing here

     

    Situation in Burundi remains tense, says outgoing Special Envoy
    During a Security Council briefing on the situation in Burundi on 30 October, Special Envoy Michel Kafando said the situation in the country remained tense, with a rise in political intolerance and violations of civil and political liberties. He expressed the hope that the 2020 electoral process would be transparent, because “badly organized and contested elections are always a source of conflict.” Mr. Kafando also announced his resignation as Special Envoy for Burundi and thanked Council members for their support during his two-and-a-half­-year tenure.
    Watch the Council briefing here

     

    New York

    Peacebuilding Commission briefed on The Gambia
    The Peacebuilding Commission met in New York on 28 October at the request of the Government of The Gambia. The Government updated the Commission on security sector reform and the transitional justice processes in the country, as well as the work of the Constitutional Review Commission. The meeting served as a platform for the Gambian Government to seek continued support for its peacebuilding priorities from the UN and the international community. Abubacarr M. Tambadou, Attorney General and Minister of Justice of The Gambia, participated in the meeting.
    For more information, contact us

     

    Colombia

    Former FARC combatants present a collection of hiking clothes
    With the idea of making a clothing line that represents their values, history and contribution to peace and reconciliation, 18 former combatants who work in a tailoring project in the territorial areas for training and reintegration of Pondores, La Guajira, and Tierra Grata, in Cesar department, created a sport/outdoors collections, launched in the city of Valledupar on 30 October. The former combatants were trained in tailoring and fashion by seven experts from La Factoría company. This project is part of the program to strengthen productive initiatives of ex-FARC combatants, which is led by the United Nations Verification Mission in Colombia with resources from DPPA.
    For more information, contact us

     

    More than 30 artists painted for reconciliation and peacebuilding
    The United Nations Verification Mission in Colombia is backing the ‘Agua Bonita Covered in Colors for Peace and Reconciliation’ festival, being held from 30 October to 3 November. More than 30 artists painted urban art at the houses of former combatants in the reintegration area of Agua Bonita, Caquetá. Former combatants, their families, and local communities will enjoy activities including academic forums about art, peacebuilding, climate change, communications and women's rights.
    For more information, contact us

     


     

    Afghanistan

    Protection of children’s rights in the spotlight at Kunduz symposium
    Participants at a UN-backed seminar on human rights, held at Kunduz University on 31 October, underscored the crucial need to strengthen measures to protect children in Afghanistan’s armed conflict. Those attending the seminar, which was facilitated by UNAMA’s Kunduz regional office, discussed international, national and Islamic principles related to protecting children during armed conflict, with a specific focus on Afghanistan.
    Read the full story here

     

    Central Asia

    Youth from Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan meet through UNRCCA initiative
    The third cross-border workshop of the UNRCCA Preventive Diplomacy Academy was held in Turkmenabad, Turkmenistan from 29 to 31 October. Young people from the Lebap Province of Turkmenistan and neighboring Bukhara Province of Uzbekistan participated in the workshop, organized by UNRCCA and the Youth Union of Turkmenistan. In her opening remarks, Special Representative Natalia Gherman highlighted the importance of investing in young people, particularly in border areas. Training in the tools of preventive diplomacy can help youth even in their daily lives, she emphasized.
    Read the full story here

     

    Iraq

    Special Representative meets protesters at Tahrir Square
    In an effort to promote dialogue between protestors and the Iraqi Government, Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, Special Representative and Head of UNAMI, visited Tahrir Square in Baghdad on 30 October to engage with demonstrators. Ms. Hennis-Plasschaert called for a national dialogue to identify prompt, meaningful responses to stop the violence and to unite against the perils of division and inaction. Standing together, Iraqis can find the common ground needed to shape a better future for all, she said.
    For more information, contact us

     

    Lebanon

    Special Coordinator calls for government that meets aspiration of the Lebanese people
    Special Coordinator for Lebanon Jan Kubis has been holding meetings with Lebanese Government and political leaders since the start of protests almost two weeks ago, stressing the importance of listening to and delivering on the legitimate demands of demonstrators. Mr. Kubis, together with Deputy Special Coordinator Philippe Lazzarini have also been meeting with representatives of civil society and members of the international community. Following the Prime Minister’s resignation on 29 October, Mr. Kubis urged the authorities “to preserve the stability of the state and its institutions and to ensure their smooth functioning.” The Special Coordinator urged the legitimate security forces to maintain law, order, and security, take action against those that instigate violence, regardless of their party affiliation, and protect demonstrating civilians, who need to maintain the peaceful character of their protests. He reminded the political parties that they bear the full responsibility for the behaviour and action of their supporters and for controlling them, especially if they provoke clashes with peaceful protesters or security forces.
    For more information, contact us

     

    Syria

    Launch of the Syrian Constitutional Committee
    The 150 members of the Syrian Constitutional Committee came together for the first time in Geneva, Switzerland, on 30 October. Representatives from the Syrian Government and the opposition will now work together to draft a new foundational text for war-torn Syria.
    In his opening remarks, Special Envoy Geir O. Pedersen said that: "The future constitution belongs to Syrians, to the Syrian people and them alone,” adding: “Today could become the beginning of something new, something meaningful for Syria and for Syrians everywhere”.
    Read more in UN News

     

    Somalia

    Special Representative visits Puntland
    James Swan, Special Representative and Head of UNSOM, visited Garowe in Puntland state on 27 October. He met with Said Deni, President of Puntland, and discussed a range of local issues related to economic development, democratic reform, and security. “We congratulated Puntland’s leaders for the recent successful investment conference and the start of the Ethiopian Airlines flight over the summer. Both offer positive signals of economic revival in Puntland. We also learned about preparations for the new Puntland Development Plan and we look forward to collaborating on that initiative,” the Special Representative told the media after the meeting.
    Read the full statement on UNSOM’s website

    Somalia recommit to end the recruitment and use of child soldiers
    The Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, Virginia Gamba, announced the launch of a USD $2 million project on her visit to the southwestern city of Baidoa on 30 October.
    The project, funded by the UN Peacebuilding Fund, will support the prevention of child recruitment and reintegration of children formerly associated with armed forces and groups. Following a meeting with the South West State’s President Abdiaziz Hassan Mohamed Laftagareen, Ms. Gamba stressed the commitment of the UN and international partners to preventing all forms of violations against children.
    Read more on UNSOM’s website

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • 1 Nov 2019

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Friday presented UN Secretary-General António Guterres with a plan for resettling hundreds-of-thousands of Syrian refugees, in the wake of the country’s offensive into northeastern Syria last month to remove Kurdish forces, aimed at creating a so-called “safe zone” along the border for returnees. 

  • 1 Nov 2019

    Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General in Guinea-Bissau (SRSG), Rosine Hadizatou Sori Coulibaly, first visited, on October 31 and November 1, the eastern regions...

  • 1 Nov 2019

    The UN Migration Agency appealed on Friday for the immediate liberation of a volunteer and child who’ve been missing since a gun battle in South Sudan at the weekend that claimed the lives of three agency workers.

  • 1 Nov 2019

    Expressing deep concern for the impact on human rights of ongoing political unrest in Haiti, the UN rights chief on Friday called on all actors to acknowledge the grievances of Haitians, many of whom have been demanding the president step down amidst violent demonstrations which ignited a sprawling emergency in recent weeks.

  • 1 Nov 2019

    Mogadishu – As Africa celebrates its youth, the United Nations envoy to Somalia today recognised the immense potential of young Somali women and men to contribute to peace and...

  • 31 Oct 2019

    Elections held earlier this month in Kosovo represent “the most significant change in the political landscape” there in a dozen years, the UN mission chief told the Security Council on Thursday.

  • 31 Oct 2019

    A recap of Thursday’s top stories: Guterres in Turkey underscores successes of mediation; 45 million lack food across Southern Africa; rights experts push to release Palestinian hunger striker; new UN health report targets causes of urban deaths; Climate change conference finds a new home; Iraq protests put country at ‘a crossroads’

  • 31 Oct 2019

    Mediation is “one of our most important tools to reduce and end conflict”, United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres told the sixth Istanbul Mediation Conference, in the Turkish capital on Thursday.

  • 31 Oct 2019

    Turkmenabad, Turkmenistan

    Third cross-border workshop within the UNRCCA Preventive Diplomacy Academy was organized by UNRCCA in...

  • 31 Oct 2019

    A UN-backed seminar at Kunduz University drew more than 100 students and professors to discuss measures to protect children in armed conflict. Photo: Hamedulla Sahell...

  • 30 Oct 2019

    The Security Council highlighted the growing partnership on matters of peace and security between the United Nations and African Union (AU) on Wednesday amidst calls to bolster overall effectiveness.

  • 30 Oct 2019

    A recap of Wednesday’s stories: new Syria talks begin in Geneva; Chile pulls out as host of major climate conference; UN calls for national talks to break cycle of violence in Iraq; UN chief voices ‘serious concern’ over Guinea-Bissau political crisis; IOM suspends South Sudan Ebola screening; UN atomic watchdog appoints new leader.

     

  • 30 Oct 2019

    Madame la Présidente du Conseil,
    Mesdames et messieurs les membre du Conseil,
    Madame la Présidente,


    Je me réjouis de l'opportunité que vous m’offrez de briefer le Conseil, à l’occasion de l’examen du rapport du Secrétaire Général, portant sur la situation au Burundi. Mais auparavant, qu’on me permette de vous féliciter pour votre accession à la présidence du Conseil de Sécurité, pour ce mois d’octobre et de saluer par la même occasion les autres membres.


    Madame la Présidente,
    Distingués Membres du Conseil,

    Le présent briefing porte sur le document qui a été déjà soumis à votre appréciation et intitulé « Rapport du Secrétaire Général sur la situation au Burundi », publié le 24 octobre 2019. La première partie de mon exposé, concerne quelques observations tirées de ce rapport ; la deuxième partie fait le point de mes activités, relativement au dialogue inter-Burundais. Dans la troisième partie, je formule quelques recommandations sur la nécessité pour l’Organisation des Nations Unies de rester présente au Burundi.

    Dans l’ordre des observations, il faut tout d’abord noter qu’à maints égards, la situation au Burundi demeure tendue. Au cours de la période considérée, on a observé une montée de l’intolérance politique et des atteintes aux libertés civiques et politiques. Le gouvernement a heureusement réagi, en mettant en place un cadre de dialogue politique, regroupant les partis politiques, les administrateurs locaux, et les représentants des forces de sécurité. Cette initiative mérite d’être encouragée et soutenue. Tout comme la condamnation à perpétuité, de quatre auteurs de l’assassinat, à Muyinga, d’un membre du parti CNL, le 18 août dernier, ainsi que les discussions en cours entre le CNARED et le Gouvernement quant au retour des leaders politiques en exil.

    La deuxième observation porte sur le processus électoral, géré par la Commission Electorale Nationale Indépendante (CENI). Il faut espérer que ce processus sera transparent. Des élections mal organisées et contestées, on le sait, sont toujours sources de conflit.

    La troisième observation porte sur la situation socio-économique, laquelle continue de se détériorer.

    La quatrième observation est centrée sur la situation sécuritaire qui, il faut bien l’admettre, s’est améliorée sur toute l’étendue du territoire, même si, ici et là, des abus et autres violations des droits de l’Homme continuent à être rapportés.

    En tout état de cause, il convient d’encourager le gouvernement dans les obligations qui sont les siennes de garantir la sécurité de tous ses citoyens et de mettre fin à l’impunité. 

    La cinquième et dernière observation a trait à la situation humanitaire qui demeure aussi préoccupante. Toutefois, il faut saluer le retour volontaire de milliers de réfugiés au pays, tout en veillant à ce que leur insertion et réintégration se fassent dans la dignité.


    Madame la Présidente,

    Le dialogue inter-Burundais sous les auspices de la Communauté de l’Afrique de l’Est, n’a toujours pas eu lieu, quatre ans après son lancement, faute, sans doute, de volonté politique des uns et des autres et aussi, pourquoi ne pas le souligner, d’engagement ferme des Etats de la sous-région. Ce dialogue aurait cependant permis que le nouveau Burundi, en perspective, soit l’affaire de tous, pour éviter ainsi les remises en cause et les éternels recommencements, ce que l’on a vu par le passé.

    Et pourtant, le 20e sommet de la Communauté de l’Afrique de l’Est, tenu à Arusha le 1er février 2019, avait décidé que le Médiateur entreprendrait davantage de consultations pour l’organisation et l’aboutissement de ce dialogue.

    Hélas ! les choses n’ont malheureusement pas bougé.

    C’est dans cette incertitude que j’ai entrepris, une fois de plus, des concertations avec les leaders de la région, à commencer par le Médiateur, le Président Yoweri Museveni, qui m’a reçu le 23 août 2019. Au cours de nos entretiens, il m’a confirmé sans ambages sa volonté de poursuivre la médiation de concert avec le Président de la Communauté de l’Afrique de l’Est, M. Kagame, ainsi que les autres Chef d’Etats de la région. Mais aussi avec le concours des Nations Unies à qui il demande de continuer d’apporter leurs appuis.


    Madame la Présidente,
    Distingués Membres du Conseil,

    Ayant accompli ces dernières démarches, le temps est venu pour moi de conclure ma mission d’Envoyé Spécial au Burundi. A vrai dire, c’est depuis le mois de juin dernier que j’avais notifié ma volonté de partir à Monsieur le Secrétaire Général. Mais ma rencontre avec le Médiateur, programmée par lui, d’abord pour le 19 juillet mais qui eut lieu finalement en août, me dissuadait alors d’officialiser ma décision. Aujourd’hui, je le confirme.

    J’atteste que même si nous n’avons pas gagné la bataille du dialogue au Burundi, le rôle des Nations Unies est loin d’avoir été négligeable. Sans conteste, nous avons contribué à susciter chez les responsables de la Région, une prise de conscience plus aigüe de ce que la stabilité au Burundi est un impératif catégorique pour la paix globale dans l’ensemble de cette région.


    Madame la Présidente,
    Distingués Membres du Conseil,

    Avec cette précision importante que je viens de mentionner, à savoir l’engagement continu des Nations Unis en faveur du Burundi, permettez-moi de refaire brièvement le compte, ne serait-ce qu’à titre de redevabilité, des principales activités accomplies dans le cadre du mandat que vous m’avez confié.

    Depuis ma nomination par le Secrétaire Général, le 5 mai 2017, comme Envoyé Spécial pour le Burundi, je n’ai ménagé aucun effort, pour aider la Facilitation et la région, à mener à terme, le processus du dialogue inter-Burundais. A cet égard, et à plusieurs reprises, j’ai entrepris des visites dans la région et consulté ses principaux leaders, notamment le Médiateur et le Facilitateur, ainsi que les parties prenantes burundaises.

    J’ai aussi, en de nombreuses occasions, rencontré les autorités de l’Union Africaine, à l’effet de les sensibiliser et solliciter leur engagement dans la recherche d’une solution consensuelle au Burundi. De même, j’ai approché certains Chefs d’Etat africains, toujours dans le même objectif.

    En deux ans et demi de mission, j’ai été reçu une fois par le Président Pierre Nkurunziza. Plus précisément, c’était au lendemain de ma nomination, le 27 Juin 2017. Les espoirs nés de cette première rencontre avec le Chef de l’Etat du Burundi, notamment sur les questions liées au dialogue et à la coopération avec l’ONU, dont la signature du SOMA, n’ont malheureusement pas encore abouti.

    Durant mes régulières visites au Burundi, j’ai eu des séances de travail avec les principaux acteurs et leaders politiques, tant de l’opposition que du Parti au pouvoir; les représentants de la société civile ; ceux des confessions religieuses, des femmes et des jeunes et naturellement avec les diplomates accrédités dans ce pays. J’ai rencontré les responsables du CNARED, à Bruxelles pour les persuader d’aller au dialogue. Mon Bureau à Bujumbura a établi des rapports de coopération avec toutes les parties concernées et d’abord avec les représentants du Gouvernement ; ceux de la communauté internationale et les principaux acteurs politiques.

    Au sein du Groupe Conjoint de Travail (JTWG), mis en place pour soutenir les efforts du Facilitateur, mon Bureau a apporté un appui significatif sur le plan technique, logistique et financier, contribuant ainsi à la tenue de plusieurs réunions de consultations dont les sessions plénières du dialogue, à Arusha et à Entebbe.

    L’appui multiforme de mon Bureau et mon engagement personnel auprès du Facilitateur et du Médiateur, ont contribué souvent à lever certains blocages politiques et techniques et  rendu possible la poursuite du processus de recherche de la paix.


    Madame la Présidente,
    Distingués Membres du Conseil,

    Depuis ma prise de fonction, j’ai eu l’opportunité de rendre régulièrement compte à votre Conseil, de l’évolution de la situation au Burundi. J’ai apprécié vos remarques, vos conseils, et vos encouragements. Au moment de mettre fin à ma mission, je tiens à vous remercier pour tous ces égards et pour le soutien constant et multiforme que vous m’avez apporté.

    Je remercie Monsieur le Secrétaire General pour la confiance qu’il m’a faite tout au long de ma mission.

    Je remercie l’Ambassadeur Jürg Lauber, Président de la Configuration-Burundi de la Commission des Nations Unies pour la Consolidation de la Paix.

    Je remercie tous mes collaborateurs, et en premier lieu l’équipe du Bureau de L’Envoyé Spécial à Bujumbura et celle du Département des Affaires Politiques et de la Consolidation de la Paix.

    Je remercie les autorités et le peuple burundais.

    En un mot, j’exprime ma sincère gratitude à tous ceux qui ont facilité ma mission.

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