Bienvenidos a las Naciones Unidas

Reports and Policy Documents

2020

  • 8 Mayo 2020

    Ashgabat, TURKMENISTAN

    Special Representative of the Secretary- General for Central Asia, Natalia Gherman, on behalf of the UN Secretary-General, António Guterres, expressed support to the collaborative efforts of Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan aimed at mitigating the consequences of the breach at the Sardoba dam that happened on 1 May.

    High-level interaction and the personal attention...

  • 7 Mayo 2020

    UN Secretary-General António Guterres and his Special Representative in Iraq, welcomed the long-delayed formation of a new Government in Baghdad on Thursday and called for meaningful reforms to be put into place to better the lives of the Iraqi people and strengthen democratic institutions.

  • 7 Mayo 2020

    THE SECRETARY-GENERAL'S GLOBAL APPEAL TO ADDRESS AND COUNTER

    COVID-19-RELATED HATE SPEECH 

    COVID-19 does not care who we are, where we live, what we believe or about any other distinction.  We need every ounce of solidarity to tackle it together.  Yet the pandemic continues to unleash a tsunami of hate and xenophobia, scapegoating and scare-mongering.

    Anti-foreigner sentiment has surged online...

  • 7 Mayo 2020

     

    New York, 8-9 May 2020

    At this time of remembrance and reconciliation,...

  • 7 Mayo 2020

    In the face of the pandemic, DPPA, at UN headquarters and in the field, has adapted its operations in order to continue providing support to Member States and partners. The Department is closely watching the impact of Covid-19 and government responses in individual countries, especially those hosting our Special Political Missions (SPMs).

  • 7 Mayo 2020
  • 6 Mayo 2020

    Bosnia and Herzegovina is weathering the COVID-19 outbreak better than some other nations, but there’s a real danger that corruption will undermine global efforts to help it contain the pandemic, the international community’s High Representative to the Western Balkan country told the Security Council on Wednesday.

  • 6 Mayo 2020

    New-York, 7 May 2020

    I send warm wishes to all celebrating the Day of Vesak, a sacred occasion to millions of Buddhists around the world.

    As we...

  • 5 Mayo 2020

    As senior UN officials spread the alarm over the rapid spread of COVID-19 through prisons – where physical distancing is nigh on impossible, and hygiene is often inadequate – UN Corrections, Justice and Human Rights teams are working to protect prison staff and detainees from the ravages of the virus.

  • 5 Mayo 2020

    Unabated violence, particularly in and around the Libyan capital, has now been raging for more than a year, the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) told the Security Council in a virtual briefing on Tuesday, warning that war crimes may have been committed.

  • 5 Mayo 2020

     

    New-York, 6 May 2020

    The COVID-19 crisis is affecting every aspect of our societies, revealing the extent of exclusion that the most marginalized members of society experience.

    Today, I would like to highlight how the pandemic is affecting the world’s 1 billion people with disabilities.

    Even under normal circumstances, persons with disabilities are less...

  • 5 Mayo 2020

    Hundreds of people congregate every day in the crowded market of Bissau, making social distancing, a major prevention measure against the COVID-19 virus, virtually impossible. To tackle this problem, the authorities decided to establish...

  • 5 Mayo 2020

    KABUL - Last week H.E. First Vice-President Amrullah Saleh and Special Representative of the Secretary-General Deborah Lyons held their first meeting...

  • 5 Mayo 2020

    Mogadishu – Last night I was informed that a commercial plane carrying humanitarian cargo for an international nongovernmental organisation crashed killing six persons on...

  • 4 Mayo 2020

    A new UN report finds that some 19 million children were displaced within their own countries due to conflict and violence in 2019, more than in any other year, making them among the most vulnerable to the global spread of COVID-19. 

  • 4 Mayo 2020
    ...
  • 3 Mayo 2020
     

    Excellencies, distinguished panel members, dear friends, Good morning, good afternoon and good evening. It is a great pleasure to speak to you, and I hope you are all keeping safe and well.   We mark World Press Freedom Day every year as an important moment to focus on media freedom and the protection of journalists. This cause remains essential. I have spent time in war zones and refugee...

  • 3 Mayo 2020

    Tripoli, 3 May 2020 - An independent media, free from intimidation and threats, is crucial to laying the foundations of democracy. On this day, I want to pay...

  • 3 Mayo 2020

    TRIPOLI, 3 May 2020 - UNHCR has begun a series of extra emergency distributions in Tripoli, to assist some of the most vulnerable people during Ramadan,...

  • 3 Mayo 2020

    Mogadishu – On the occasion of World Press Freedom Day, the United Nations envoy to Somalia today called for Somali journalists to be able to perform their work freely. “The media have a vital role to play in...

  • 3 Mayo 2020

    Nairobi – Looking back at her career so far, Farhia Mohamed Kheyre sees an inevitability to its direction.

    “I was born into war and...

  • 3 Mayo 2020

    KABUL - World Press Freedom Day is a time to reflect on the enormous value free media contributes to open and healthy societies, and how we all must play our part in defending press freedom.

    ...
  • 2 Mayo 2020

    To mark World Press Freedom of the Day, the Union of Journalists and Media Technicians of Guinea-Bissau...

  • 2 Mayo 2020

    New York, 3 May 2020

    Journalists and media workers are crucial to helping us make informed...

  • 1 Mayo 2020

     

    25 April - 1 May 2020

    This Week in DPPA is a brief roundup of political and peacebuilding events and developments at UNHQ and around the world.

    COVID-19

    Afghanistan – Ceasefire necessary to fight COVID-19  
    More than 500 civilians, including more than 150 children, were killed due to the fighting in Afghanistan during the first quarter of 2020, according to a UN report released on 27 April, highlighting the urgent need for all parties to the conflict to do more to protect civilians from harm, especially in view of the looming threat posed to all Afghans by COVID-19. “I call on all parties to seize the opportunity offered by the Secretary-General’s call for a global ceasefire to focus collective efforts on fighting a common enemy, the COVID-19 pandemic,” Deborah Lyons, Special Representative and Head of UNAMA, said. “To safeguard the lives of countless civilians in Afghanistan and to give the nation hope of a better future, it is imperative that violence is stopped with the establishment of a ceasefire and for peace negotiations to commence.”  
    Read more here 
     
    Colombia - Quarantine in reintegration areas  
    The concern about the spread of COVID-19 is also present in the reintegration areas. They are facing challenges and have closed their borders. The virtual world and isolation have also become part of daily life of the 24 former Territorial Areas for Training and Reintegration (TART) housing nearly 3,000 former FARC-EP combatants and their families. Since the infrastructure in these areas does not fully guarantee adequate sanitary conditions, former combatants have prohibited the entry of visitors and external personnel, restricted residents' movements and conducted  “disinfection days” and educational campaigns. To monitor the situation in the TARTs, the Technical Board of Health of the National Council for Reincorporation meets regularly and coordinates virtually the response measures to COVID-19 with delegates from the FARC, the Agency for Reintegration and Normalization, the Ministry of Health and the UN Verification Mission in Colombia

      
    Colombia - Transport of humanitarian aid 
    The UN Verification Mission facilitated the transport of humanitarian aid for the community of Mandé, Urrao in Antioquia on 27 April. The aid was sent by the Governor's Office as part of the COVID-19 emergency for the community and people in the process of reincorporation. That same day, the Mission facilitated the transfer of 200 food provisions for families in Vista Hermosa, Meta, donated by the Saldarriaga Concha Foundation and Colombia Cuida. Both journeys were made in the two Mission helicopters. 
    For more Information, contact us 


    For up-to-date information on COVID-19 and its impact, please visit:   
    WHO website  
    UN coronavirus website 

     

    Security Council

    Onanga-Anyanga: Pandemic will likely have negative effect on peace processes in Sudan and South Sudan   
    Parfait Onanga-Anyanga, Special Envoy for the Horn of Africa, briefed the Council on progress in the implementation of Resolution 2046 on 28 April. The resolution concerns outstanding bilateral issues between Sudan and South Sudan and the conflict in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states. The Special Envoy said that the COVID-19 pandemic will likely have a negative effect on the peace processes in the two countries, including by significantly slowing down engagements. “I am particularly worried by the exponential increase in a number of COVID-19 related deaths in Sudan. Urgent external support will be needed to help both countries offset these unprecedented challenges,” Onanga-Anyanga said.  
    Read his full remarks here 
    Read more in UN News

     

     

     

     

    Pedersen: Syria needs a ceasefire arrangement that results in sustained calm and is nationwide in scope  
    Special Envoy Geir O. Pedersen updated the Council on the situation in Syria on 29 April. “I strongly believe that Syria needs a ceasefire arrangement that results in sustained calm and is nationwide in scope – one that does not see new assaults across lines of contact, and enables Syrians to access equipment and resources necessary to combat COVID-19. We cannot afford hostilities which would surely lead to another surge in displaced vulnerable communities – something that we witnessed in horror only two months ago. We could not afford this scenario before the pandemic; the price could only be higher now,” Mr. Pedersen said. 
    Read his full remarks here 
    Read more in UN News

     

    Afghanistan 

    New head of UNAMA speaks with Afghan  President  
    Deborah Lyons, Special Representative and Head of UNAMA, had an introductory call with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani on 26 April. They discussed the need for an inclusive government, prospects for intra-Afghan negotiations leading to peace, and coordination around COVID-19. “I am very happy to be back working with the resilient Afghan people as they embrace these challenging times on the way to a brighter future. Enough suffering. Time for peace and opportunity for Afghan boys and girls. The UN is your partner in this important work,” Ms. Lyons said in a tweet after the meeting.
    For more Information, contact us   


    Iraq 

    Meeting with President of Kurdistan   
    Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, Special Representative and Head of UNAMI, met with President Nechirvan Barzani of the Kurdistan region on 28 April. The Special Representative was accompanied by Dr. Adham Ismail, Iraq Representative for the World Health Organization. They discussed the political developments in Iraq including the ongoing activities to form the new Iraqi Government, Baghdad-Erbil relations and efforts to contain the COVID-19 pandemic. On 27 April, Ms. Hennis-Plasschaert met with Prime Minister Masrour Barzani, with whom she discussed the current political, security, economic and health situation in the Region, with special emphasis on the formation of the new Iraqi government, and Baghdad-Erbil relations. 
    For more Information, contact us 


    African Union

    UN and other international organizations sign multi-year partnership to eliminate violence against women and girls  
    After a year of negotiations coordinated by the Special Representative and Head of UNOAU,  Hanna Tetteh, the UN, the AU and the EU on 27 April signed the Spotlight Initiative Africa Regional Programme, which will work towards the elimination of all forms of violence against women and girls, including harmful practices. The  Programme design is guided by the provisions of AU Agenda 2063; the development priorities of Agenda 2030 for sustainable development; the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa (the Maputo Protocol) and other related key regional instruments. 
    For more Information, contact us 

     

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    Contact DPPA at dppa@un.org

  • 1 Mayo 2020

    Spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on Lebanon Protests

     

    We are deeply concerned by the renewed violence...

  • 1 Mayo 2020

    Garowe – At the age of 30, Halima-Sadiya Abdullahi is already a veteran Somali journalist and well-known to the public in her home state of Puntland in northern Somalia. 

    Her...

  • 1 Mayo 2020

    New York, 1 May 2020

    In many countries around the world, today is a day to celebrate workers.  This year, with the COVID-19 pandemic unfolding around us, we are truly seeing workers who too often toil unseen.

    Perhaps as never before, we recognize the role that essential workers play in keeping our societies functioning — getting food to tables and markets, keeping...

  • 30 Abr 2020

    Building on the various Libyan and international calls for a ceasefire, including the Libyan National Army's constructive statement announcing a truce during Ramadan and the response...

  • 30 Abr 2020

    Between 1 January and 31 March 2020, UNSMIL documented at least 131 civilian casualties (64 deaths and 67 injuries). This figure represents an overall increase in civilian...

  • 30 Abr 2020

    The UN Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) releases its first quarter civilian casualty report for 2020. The data shows an increase in civilian casualties from the armed conflict in...

  • 30 Abr 2020

    The members of the Security Council expressed their strong concern at the 25 April declaration of the Southern Transitional Council (STC). They reaffirmed their strong commitment to Yemen’s unity, sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity, and called for expediting implementation of the Riyadh Agreement. They expressed concern that the STC actions could distract from the efforts of Special Envoy Martin Griffiths to secure a nationwide...

  • 30 Abr 2020

    In northeast Nigeria, where armed conflict has forced millions from their homes, the UN’s migration agency, IOM, is supporting the construction of quarantine shelters, as the region braces for an outbreak of COVID-19 which, it warns, would have ‘devastating consequences’ for those who have been displaced. 

  • 29 Abr 2020

    Mr. President, 
     
    1. Last month, you, the members of the Security Council, “called on all parties to ensure a sustained period of calm throughout the country and reaffirmed the need for the full implementation of UN Security Council resolution 2254”. This signal from the Council was timely, following the Secretary-General’s call for an immediate global ceasefire, and my appeal for a nationwide ceasefire in Syria and an all-out effort to combat COVID-19. Let me appeal to you to preserve this common purpose.  
     
    2. I strongly believe that Syria needs a ceasefire arrangement that results in sustained calm and is nationwide in scope – one that does not see new assaults across lines of contact, and enables Syrians to access equipment and resources necessary to combat COVID-19. We cannot afford hostilities which would surely lead to another surge in displaced vulnerable communities – something that we witnessed in horror only two months ago. We could not afford this scenario before the pandemic; the price could only be higher now. 
     

    Mr. President, 
     
    3. This past month, I have maintained active channels with the Syrian parties. I have also spoken with foreign ministers and senior officials from a range of key players, including Russia, Turkey and Iran – whose foreign ministers recently conferred virtually; the United States; the European Union and many European states; and the Secretary-General of the League of Arab States and several Arab ministers. I have appreciated the engagement of all with my efforts to facilitate progress on the political track and to sustain ceasefire arrangements. I will be continuing active engagement with these and other interlocutors in the days and weeks ahead.   
     

    Mr. President, 
     
    4. I welcome the fact that there has been significant calm in many areas of Syria – especially relative to the apexes of violence of previous years. We have not witnessed all-out offensives nor further displacements since early March. Russian-Turkish arrangements have taken hold in the northwest, and I do see a positive difference on the ground, including compared with previous arrangements. The level of incidents is low.  
     
    5. Six Russian-Turkish joint patrols have taken place. They have been challenged -- but there have been responses to those challenges too.  
     
    6. I appeal to all relevant parties to address internationally proscribed terrorist groups in a cooperative and targeted manner, so as not to compromise the existing calm and the 

    COVID-19 response, and so as to ensure full respect of international humanitarian law and the protection of civilians.  
     
    7. I also note that the different ceasefire arrangements between Russia, Turkey and the US in the northeast also continue to broadly hold.  
     
    8. But, Mr. President, this is an uneasy and fragile calm in both northwest and northeast Syria. And there is the constant risk of escalation in Syria.   
     
    9. Just yesterday, a bomb in a market in Afrin reportedly killed more than 40 people. Security conditions in southern Syria are concerning. A worrying resurgence by ISIL in desert areas in central and eastern Syria has continued. I am also concerned about reports of Israeli airstrikes in rural Homs and Damascus, the most recent of which was reported this past Monday.  
     

    Mr. President, 
     
    10. The Syrian Government has continued to take increasingly significant steps to combat COVID-19. So have the Syrian Opposition Coalition-and other de facto authorities in areas outside government control. International donors have pledged and provided financial and material support. Under-Secretary-General Mark Lowcock will brief you this afternoon on the UN family’s efforts to help build capacity to test and treat COVID19 in Syria.   11. While testing remains limited, the officially reported COVID-19 caseload in Syria is comparatively low: 42 reported cases in areas controlled by the Syrian Government; 1 reported case in the northeast; and no reported cases in the northwest. Mr. President, we all hope that these low numbers will continue – but as in all countries, the risk of a major COVID-19 outbreak in Syria is there. The trend lines in the coming weeks will be very important. So will a ramping up of testing and treatment capacity in all parts of Syria, along with information sharing between all parties.  
     
    12. Syria faces many challenges that can hamstring a response to the pandemic. Syria also lacks sufficient health professionals, medical equipment and supplies. The healthcare system is degraded in some areas and destroyed in others, following nine years of armed conflict. You all saw the recent findings of the Secretary-General’s Board of Inquiry, a terrible reminder of what has happened in this conflict.  
     
    13. Let me reiterate the need for full, sustained and unimpeded humanitarian access, using all modalities, including scaled-up cross line and cross border access is important.  
     
    14. As part of the global efforts, the Secretary-General has appealed for the waiver of sanctions that can undermine the capacity of the country to ensure access to food, essential health supplies and COVID-19 medical support to respond to the pandemic. This has been affirmed in direct information to the Syrian government. The United Nations, and I personally, have directly engaged concerned States so that all humanitarian exemptions to sanctions remain available and are fully utilized to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. I note the positive response of different countries to the United Nations on this aspect.   
     
    15. Turning to the economic situation, after nine years of conflict and a wide range of factors and measures, Syria faces extremely grave economic conditions. We have recently seen price increases and shortages among other further worsening trends. The measures rightly taken by the authorities to combat COVID-19 in Syria have – as in all countries – also had an economic impact too.  
     
    16. I have long urged the parties to move to large-scale and unilateral releases of detainees and abductees and more meaningful actions on missing persons. The pandemic makes this humanitarian imperative more urgent than ever. I continue to urge the Syrian Government and all other Syrian parties to follow the lead of other governments around the world in releasing detainees. We really need to see this happening as part of all the efforts to stem the spread of the virus in Syria.  
     
    17. The need for an all-out effort to combat COVID-19 in Syria was conveyed to me on Monday in consultations with civil society actors in all different parts of Syria via our Civil Society Support Room, which included many medical NGOs and other grass-roots organisations. They are doing all they can to raise awareness and support local communities. They reflected the diversity of the challenges faced in the various parts of the country, and a common belief that more can and needs to be done to support the efforts underway.  
     
    18. The Women’s Advisory Board has been convening virtually every week since the risk of a COVID-19 crisis emerged. I spoke with them yesterday. They expressed support for a sustained ceasefire throughout the country, and support for medical staff and provision of food, medicine, medical supplies and equipment to access all regions of Syria, without delay or impediment. They emphasised that women are at the forefront of communitybased initiatives to raise awareness and prevent the spread of COVID-19, and explained how they are carrying additional caregiving responsibilities at home due to the movement restrictions. They also noted heightened risks of domestic violence in isolation settings – and fears of potential marginalization of women as COVID-19 response gradually pushes some to more traditional roles. They stressed that nothing should come in the way of the furtherance of the political process in accordance with resolution 2254. 
     
    19. In that regard, I briefed you last month that the agenda for a next session of the Constitutional Committee had been agreed between the co-chairs. It will be important to build on this with a substantive discussion during a next round. The co-chairs have been clear in their dealings with me that agreement during a next session on national foundations and principles is not a precondition to moving to other items in subsequent sessions. I remain in regular contact with them on how to resume the meetings in Geneva as soon as the situation allows – and I have been in touch with the civil society members of the committee and will further that too. We continue to explore whether any preparatory work can take place in the meantime. I urge all members to be seriously preparing for renewed work. 
     

    Mr. President, 
     
    20. I reiterate my appeal for a nationwide ceasefire and an all-out effort to ensure that Syrians across the country will have access to the equipment and resources needed to combat and treat COVID-19. I stand ready to work with the government and the opposition and all relevant players on the ground, as well as key countries with weight and influence. I see every possibility for relevant players to come together in a common effort to support sustained calm and scaling up of the response to the pandemic. This is the only responsible path.  
     
    21. And I believe it is the path that also could pave the way for progress on the broader political process to implement Security Council resolution 2254. We all agree: there is no military solution to the Syria crisis. We must act on our common humanity, help build trust and confidence including via reciprocal measures, and begin to move towards a political settlement that can meet the legitimate aspirations of the Syrian people and fully restore Syria’s sovereignty, territorial integrity and independence. 
     
    Thank you, Mr. President. 

  • 29 Abr 2020

    Early signs are that the COVID-19 virus poses a greater direct health risk to men, and particularly older men. But the pandemic is exposing and exploiting inequalities of all kinds, including gender inequality. In the long term, its impact on women’s health, rights and freedoms could harm us all.

    Women are already suffering the deadly impact of lockdowns and quarantines. These restrictions are...

  • 29 Abr 2020

    Syria desperately needs a nationwide ceasefire to enable its war-weary citizens to access the equipment and resources necessary to combat COVID-19, the UN’s top envoy for the country told the Security Council on Wednesday.  

  • 28 Abr 2020

    Briefing to the Security Council on Resolution 2046

     

    Mr. President,

    Thank you for the opportunity to, once more, brief the Security Council on progress in the implementation of Resolution 2046 which concerns outstanding bilateral issues between Sudan and South Sudan and the conflict in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states.

    This briefing is taking place at a time when the world community is facing a deadly global pandemic in the form of COVID-19. In Sudan and South Sudan, the COVID-19 pandemic has wide-ranging health, human and socio-economic implications compounded by plummeting oil prices, a desert locust invasion and climatic vagaries. Allow me to echo the multiple calls of the Secretary-General in favor of the countries of the region, including those on today’s agenda, in view of the unfolding dire socio-economic impact that affect them. I am particularly worried by the exponential increase in a number of COVID-19 related deaths in Sudan. Urgent external support will be needed to help both countries offset these unprecedented challenges. The pandemic will also likely have a negative effect on the peace processes in the two countries, including by significantly slowing down engagements. My office is currently coordinating a UN-wide technical support to enable IGAD Secretariat to formulate a regional strategy and develop an action plan in response to the pandemic pursuant to the decisions of the IGAD virtual Summit meeting of 30 March chaired by Prime Minister Abdallah Handok. 

     

    Mr. President,

    Since my last report to the Council in October 2019, I have had opportunities to engage with authorities in Sudan and South Sudan, as well as with regional actors. My joint visit with Under-Secretary-General Jean-Pierre Lacroix to Abyei last February in the aftermath of the tragic Kolom incident was part of these efforts. Undeniably, both countries have been consolidating their improved relations, notably by the constructive roles played in each other’s peace process. In this regard, South Sudan has continued to host and facilitate the Sudanese peace process under the aegis of President Salva Kiir. Conversely, the Government of Sudan’s mediation contributed to the compromise between President Kiir and Dr. Riek Machar that led to the formation of the Revitalized Transitional Government of National Unity on 12 March 2020. These commendable efforts do not in any way diminish the tremendous diplomatic push by other regional actors, including by South Africa.

    Furthermore, having inherited the South Sudan file as new IGAD Chairperson at a time when the opposition and the incumbent government were deadlocked on the number and boundaries of states, Prime Minister Hamdok, alongside his co-guarantor President Museveni of Uganda, is credited for having helped resolve the issue by encouraging President Kiir on the sidelines of the AU summit in early February to return South Sudan to 10 states. Prime Minister Hamdok thereafter congratulated the South Sudanese leader on “the courageous decision” he took on 15 February, which espoused the IGAD position. Demonstrating the changed spirit of the relationship between the two countries, President Kiir strongly condemned the assassination attempt on Prime Minister Hamdok in Khartoum on 9 March. In the same vein, while guaranteeing the security of Dr. Machar in Khartoum, Sudan ensured that General Hemedti accompanied him to and from Juba for consultations, including during his face-to-face meetings with President Kiir between September 2019 and February 2020.

    The strength of the improved relations between the two countries was put to the test by two sad developments. The first was a deadly armed attack perpetrated by Misseriya herdsmen in the Kolom locality of Abyei on 22 January against a community of Ngok Dinka, and the second was the sudden death by natural cause on 25 March in Juba of the Sudanese Minister of Defence, late General Gamal al-Din Omar, after jointly chairing the meeting of the Joint Political and Security Mechanism (JPSM) with his South Sudanese counterpart. Admittedly, the emphasis put by both parties to deepen their cooperation and to support each other’s stability and peace is very commendable.

     

    Mister President,

    In Sudan, where Prime Minister Hamdok is leading a challenging transition, his attention is largely directed at defusing tensions and finding consensus between political players in Khartoum, including on issues resulting from the increasingly dire economic situation. Meanwhile, the Prime Minister is also seeking to deliver on his commitment to peace through negotiations with the armed movements. In this regard, the recent statement by General al-Burhan, the President of the Sovereign Council, on the unity of the leadership of the transition is very encouraging. In South Sudan, President Kiir and First Vice-President Riek Machar are striving to re-establish a partnership that has twice shown its limits, while doing everything possible to overcome the political stalemate on the sharing of states and allocation of governors.

    Otherwise, cooperation in oil management between the two countries has continued to remain strong. After a decision to extend the agreement on oil beyond its December 2019 deadline to March 2022, South Sudan has been steadily making payments relating to the Transitional Financial Arrangement by providing Sudan with 28,000 barrels of oil per day. Out of the initial amount due of $3.02 billion, South Sudan now owes approximately $500 million and will continue to use the facilities based in Sudan and export its oil through Port Sudan against payment of a fixed processing, transit and transportation fee. The effect of the drastic fall in oil prices this month on this cooperation has yet to become clear.

     

    Mister President,

    As most Sudanese armed opposition movements settled for President Kiir’s facilitation of their negotiations with Khartoum, and with the possibility of moving them to a third country ruled out, the talks resumed in Juba in January and are ongoing. Since the outbreak of COVID-19 the talks have proceeded in a virtual format. Prime Minister Hamdok remains open to discuss all issues and the root causes of Sudan’s many conflicts in the hope of reaching an agreement that unites all Sudanese. Encouragingly, opposition movements have also re-stated their irreversible determination to achieve peace.

    Crucially, despite disagreements between the parties on issues such as secularism, autonomy and self-determination which have resulted in several extensions to the initial deadline for concluding the talks, significant progress has been achieved globally as evidenced, inter alia, by the renewed commitment to unilateral ceasefires by armed movements. At the behest of President Kiir, the South Sudanese lead mediator travelled occasionally to Khartoum to brief Sudanese authorities on progress in the peace process. The talks are now scheduled to end on 9 May, but it remains to be seen whether this deadline will be met under the current circumstances.

    So far, the government has signed framework agreements with the SPLM-North (Agar) as well as with armed movements from Darfur and Eastern Sudan. The agreements address the key concerns pertaining to marginalization, lack of development and participation in governance institutions. However, they do not completely address the issue of separation between religion and the state which SPLM-North (Agar) sees as critical. The next negotiation phases will be concerned with security arrangements and participation in transitional institutions.

    Negotiations with Darfuri armed movements delivered a major outcome as agreement was reached with the government on 11 February to establish a special court for war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in Darfur and to seek justice through the ICC. Notwithstanding progress on the Darfur track, the absence from the talks of the Sudan Liberation Movement (SLM-AW) of Abdel Wahid Al-Nur is a source of grave concern.

    Similarly, talks with SPLM-North (Al-Hilu) do not appear to have made any headway. Although present in Juba, Abdelaziz Al-Hilu has refused to engage with the government unless it agrees to a secular Sudan and self-determination for Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile states. The government’s position is that these issues should be addressed by the constitutional conference and not through the negotiations in Juba. A joint committee on reforms established on 6 April has been mandated to, inter alia, meet with Al-Hilu in a bid to break this impasse.

     

    Mr. President,

    Despite their support to each other, Sudan and South Sudan have had minimal bilateral engagements within the framework of their Cooperation Agreements but continued to focus on their internal conflicts. However, they have stopped accusing each other of supporting or hosting their respective rebels. Instead, they are mutually reinforcing each other’s efforts to end internal conflicts. While both countries are careful to avoid dealing with any points of conflict amid the challenges of their respective transitions and COVID-19, it is hoped that the rapprochement and consolidated relations will subsequently provide the incentive for them to address the outstanding issues under the Cooperation Agreements, including the situation in Abyei. In this regard, the announcement on 23 January by President Kiir and Gen. Hemetti of the establishment of a joint mechanism to protect civilians and the deployment of a disengagement force to the area, as well as the establishment of a committee to investigate the Kolom incident are all positive steps. It is hoped that these issues will feature on the agenda of the next Joint Political and Security Mechanism session in Khartoum, which was postponed to an unspecified date due to concerns over COVID-19 and the sudden death of the Sudanese defence minister in Juba.

    Regarding the Two Areas, Prime Minister Hamdok’s visit to the locality on 9 January and his openness to discuss all issues have raised hope that conflict there may soon be a thing of the past. However, the wrangling between the two SPLM-North factions must cease and forward movement is required on the negotiation track involving the SPLM-North (Al-Hilu).

    At my meeting with President Kiir on 17 January, I congratulated him on his mediation of the Sudanese peace process which was beginning to achieve concrete results and stressed the importance of sustained engagement with Sudanese authorities on various bilateral issues. The President agreed, and assured me that, once peace is achieved in both countries, they would be in a better position to discuss outstanding issues in view of a mutually beneficial relationship. The foreign minister advised that the two countries would also prioritize reconciliation in Abyei for now. Accordingly, during the meetings with Misseriya and Ngok Dinka communities in Abyei on 12-13 February in the company of USG Lacroix, I stressed on reconciliation and peaceful co-existence.

    My Office will continue to engage with the authorities of both countries and, as appropriate, with all key regional actors, including the African Union and IGAD, to encourage them not only to consolidate peace and stability within their territories but to also advance the implementation of all biding cooperation agreements.

    Thank you for your attention.

     

  • 28 Abr 2020

    Sudan’s efforts to stop the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, are delaying the deployment of fresh United Nations police units in Abyei and the border regions between Sudan and South Sudan, the UN’s peacekeeping chief told the Security Council on Tuesday

  • 28 Abr 2020

    Mogadishu – Somalia’s international partners* welcome the dialogue between the Jubaland administration and the leadership of the Jubaland Council for Change...

  • 28 Abr 2020

    In response to questions on Yemen, the Spokesman had the following to say:

    “The Secretary-General is following with concern the developments on the ground in southern Yemen. He urges all relevant stakeholders to exercise maximum restraint and refrain from any actions that would further escalate the situation.

    “The Secretary-General calls on all to engage in an inclusive dialogue to resolve their differences and address the legitimate concerns of all Yemenis,...

  • 28 Abr 2020

    Mogadishu – Nowadays, the much-admired gardens and once-full classrooms at the campus of Plasma University in Mogadishu are empty. 

    Like the rest of Somalia’s higher...

  • 27 Abr 2020

    Bogotá, 27 April 2020.  On 23 March, the United Nations Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres, called for a global ceasefire and to put the armed conflict on lockdown to focus attention on the Covid-19 pandemic. In Colombia, the National Liberation Army (ELN) responded to that call and declared a unilateral active ceasefire for one month starting 1 April.

    A few days before the end of the ELN's declared ceasefire, various voices, including the Conflict Analysis...

  • 27 Abr 2020

    In the first quarter of 2020, the number of civilian casualties in Afghanistan fell by nearly a third from the same period a year earlier, representing the lowest first quarter figure since 2012, according to a UN report released on Monday.

  • 27 Abr 2020

    The needs of Yemen’s people should be put first, ahead of actions that risk escalating the already dire situation inside the war-shattered country, UN Special Envoy for the war-weary country, Martin Griffiths, said on Monday.

  • 27 Abr 2020

     UNITED NATIONS

    I welcome this opportunity to present my first report on youth, peace and security. 

    Since this report was issued, our world has been shaken by the COVID-19 pandemic.  

    Young people are feeling the impact acutely, from lost jobs to family stress, mental health and other hardships. 

    ...
  • 27 Abr 2020

    Even amidst the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, countries must do more to harness the talents of young people to address the crisis and its aftermath, the UN Secretary-General told the Security Council on Monday during a videoconference meeting to review the five years since its adoption of a landmark resolution on youth, peace and security.

  • 27 Abr 2020

    The Special Envoy for the Secretary-General for the Great Lakes region, Huang Xia, said travel restrictions and quarantine measures seem to be keeping the spread of the deadly virus at bay...

  • 27 Abr 2020

    @OSESGY

    Amman, 27 April 2020 - The UN Special Envoy for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, is concerned by the 25 April declaration by the Southern Transitional Council (STC).

    “The latest turn of events is disappointing,...

  • 27 Abr 2020

    KABUL - More than 500 civilians, including more than 150 children, were killed due to the fighting in Afghanistan during the first quarter of 2020, according to a United...

  • 25 Abr 2020

    Yesterday, 24 April, the UN Secretary-General, António Guterres, in a statement released by his spokesman, “took note” of the decision by the Authority of Heads of State and...