Bienvenidos a las Naciones Unidas

Reports and Policy Documents

2020

  • 19 Mayo 2020

    The civil war in Libya is in danger of intensifying as foreign intervention grows and the spectre of the COVID-19 pandemic adds to a deepening sense of insecurity, the head of the UN Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) told the Security Council on Tuesday.

  • 19 Mayo 2020

    The Office of the United Nations Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process (UNSCO) expresses its gratitude to the Government of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) for the delivery of fourteen tonnes of urgent medical supplies. The supplies will support the efforts to curb the spread of COVID-19 pandemic and its impact in the occupied Palestinian territory (oPt). The aid includes personal protective equipment (PPE) and medical equipment. Most...

  • 19 Mayo 2020

    The Office of the United Nations Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process (UNSCO) expresses its gratitude to the Government of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) for the delivery of sixteen tonnes of urgent medical supplies. The supplies will support the efforts to curb the spread of COVID-19 pandemic and its impact in the occupied Palestinian territory (oPt). The aid includes personal protective equipment (PPE) and medical equipment. Most...

  • 19 Mayo 2020

    Impact of COVID-19 on Conflict Dynamics and Mediation, Antalya Diplomatic Forum, 19 May 2020, Remarks by United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs Rosemary DiCarlo

    I am pleased to join you today and am grateful to Turkey for organizing today’s event under the auspices of the International Peace Institute.

    Though the COVID-19 pandemic is foremost a health crisis, it also has wide-ranging humanitarian, economic, and human rights dimensions. And it risks hitting conflict settings especially hard.

    This is a time for vigilance. As the Secretary-General recently informed the Security Council, the pandemic also poses a significant threat to international peace and security. He outlined a number of risks that are particularly pressing, including: a further erosion of trust in public institutions if citizens perceive that authorities mishandled the response; an economic fallout that could create greater stressors, potentially leading to civil unrest; postponement of elections or the holding of a vote with or without adequate mitigation measures, leading to a crisis of legitimacy; conflict actors exploiting the situation to press their advantage; increased terrorist activity; and restrictions of movement making conflict prevention and resolution more difficult.

    All of this happening at a time when mediation efforts are needed more than ever.

    The challenge for peacemakers and peacemaking is great.

    On 23 March, the Secretary General appealed for a global ceasefire to stop the fighting, to facilitate the delivery of aid, and to open space for diplomatic engagement. He made his appeal in recognition of the fact that as conflicts rage, COVID-19 will further complicate our efforts to resolve them.

    The initial response was impressive. Support has come from every corner of the world and includes member states, regional partners, civil society and prominent religious leaders. Combatants – from Colombia and Cameroon to the Philippines and parts of the Middle East – supported the appeal and took tentative steps to stop fighting.

    However, these initial gestures of support are not translating into concrete change on the ground. Regrettably, the guns are yet to be silenced.

    The situation in the Sahel has deteriorated following increased attacks. Extremist groups have disregarded the call and instead urged their followers to take advantage of COVID-19, including by spreading disinformation. In Libya, where the parties have called for humanitarian truces at various times in the past, the fighting has increased.

    The conflict has not stopped in Syria or Afghanistan. Last week’s despicable attack on a maternity hospital in Kabul left 24 people dead and another 16 wounded, including women and new-born babies.

    Meanwhile in Yemen, despite the announcement of a temporary unilateral ceasefire by Saudi Arabia on behalf of the Coalition, the violence persists.

    Nevertheless, the ceasefire call has refocused attention on the suffering caused by armed conflict and the urgency to end fighting in order to face a new global common threat. We must continue to apply pressure on conflict parties to stop the fighting. Such pressure must also come from those supporting conflict parties, politically or with weapons.

    A ceasefire can lead to discussions on lasting political solutions. While the pandemic has affected the practice of diplomacy and mediation itself, our envoys and missions have increased efforts to reignite political processes around the world, often through the use of digital tools and platforms to engage with conflict parties as well as other stakeholders - even in the context of ongoing fighting.

    In Libya, for example, the working groups established in Berlin have met remotely. In Yemen, the Special Envoy is making a concerted effort to expand the space for political talks through remote dialogue.

    And in Afghanistan, the government and the Taliban engaged through virtual means last month on prisoner releases, though talks have since stalled.

    Although we all recognize the limitations of remote dialogues, the increased use of technology has the potential to create opportunities and enhance the inclusivity of peace processes, including with the participation of women and young people.

    The path ahead is not easy. Nobody said it would be. To succeed, the international community will have to come together decisively and help translate early gains, now fading, into lasting peace.

  • 19 Mayo 2020

    Mr. President, 

    Members of the Security Council,

    ...
  • 18 Mayo 2020

    KABUL - Rising numbers of civilian casualties in Afghanistan, with a disregard for international law aimed at protecting...

  • 18 Mayo 2020

    Renewed trust, confidence, and cooperation between international players and Syrians could finally “unlock progress”, putting the country on a political path towards lasting peace, the UN Special Envoy for Syria told the Security Council on Monday.

  • 18 Mayo 2020

    Security Council Briefing on the Situation in Syria by UN Special Envoy Geir O. Pedersen

     

    Mr. President,

    Since my last report, I have engaged widely among Syrians from all parts of the country, who have been keen to communicate with the United Nations at this time when all of us are finding new ways to be in touch. I have been struck by how deep their concerns are about the current state and future of their beloved country, Syria.

    I have heard relief that the COVID-19 pandemic has so far not hit Syria at the scale initially feared – but also fears that it still could do so. I sense deep anxiety over the fact that, even if violence has for the moment somewhat abated, it does continue, and it can escalate at any moment. I have heard immediate concerns at the further decline of the economy and the suffering this is causing. There is a profound apprehension and worry about the fate and wellbeing of detainees, abductees and missing persons. There is, frankly, disappointment that the political process has not really delivered tangible improvements in the lives of Syrians. And there is a widespread sense that international competition is more prominent than cooperation, with Syrians paying the price.

    I share these concerns. And I take them as a strong reminder to the international community of the importance of building a constructive Syria diplomacy to support a political solution. It is hard, but it is not impossible, and we must try.

     

    Mr. President,

    We have elements to build on. In the northwest, this month saw further progress in Russian-Turkish cooperation on the ground, pursuant to their March agreement that brought relative calm to Idlib. We all hope that this bodes well for sustaining calm there.

    But this calm has been punctuated by violent incidents and mutual attempts at cross-line offensives - most notably, one by the extremist wa-Harid al-Mu’minin operations room. A number of Syrian soldiers were killed during this attack. This prompted an escalation, including increased artillery strikes on areas inside Idlib, as well as rocket fire towards Hmeimim airbase in Latakia, before the episode was contained.

    Meanwhile, there have also been further incidents of mutual shelling, IED attacks around Afrin and the northeast; further tensions, targeted killings, military build-up and clashes in the southwest; further reports of Israeli airstrikes in Deir-ez-Zor and Aleppo; as well as further incidents pointing to an ISIL resurgence in the eastern desert.

    In short, Mr. President, violence continues and there is a constant risk of escalation which could unravel existing arrangement. We see such dangers right now in Daraa. We must at all costs avoid reversion to the all-out fighting and abuses and violations we have seen before.

    Let us also remember that Syria’s instability reverberates elsewhere too – including as far as Libya, given reports of fighters being recruited in Syria in large numbers and sent to fight on both sides of that conflict.

    This Council has called on all parties to ensure a sustained period of calm throughout the country. Key players should be working together – and I stand ready to assist in that -- so that significant calm in many areas is sustained, enhanced and expanded into a nationwide ceasefire, as called for in resolution 2254. Let me reiterate my belief that the presence of listed terrorist groups only underlines the need for a cooperative approach in countering them – one that ensures stability, protects civilians and fully respects international humanitarian law.

     

    Mr. President,

    Syria has thankfully not to date experienced mass COVID-19 outbreaks that have been the fate of many other countries. Bearing in mind testing limitations, the officially reported caseload is 64, of which 58 are in Government-controlled areas and 6 in the northeast. No cases have yet been reported in the northwest. We note the early measures enacted by the Syrian Government and other de facto authorities to address the pandemic – some of which are now being eased. Of course, as in all countries, the risk of broader outbreak remains – and given the Syrian context, any such development could have devastating consequences in the country and beyond it too.

    Under-Secretary-General Mark Lowcock will update you on the humanitarian issues when he briefs you tomorrow. Let me note the importance of full, sustained and unimpeded humanitarian access, using all modalities, including scaled-up cross line and cross border access, to deliver assistance. As we scale up prevention and protection against COVID-19 in Government-controlled areas and in the northwest, such access is absolutely critical elsewhere too, including in the northeast, where gaps in medical supplies have widened.

    Further to the Secretary-General’s global call for the waiver of sanctions that can undermine the capacity of countries to ensure access to food, essential health supplies and medical support to respond to the pandemic, let me note the public assurances by relevant States that their sanctions programs relating to Syria neither ban the flow of humanitarian supplies nor target medicine and medical devices. I welcome their commitments to fully and expeditiously apply humanitarian exemptions. I continue to closely follow this issue.

     

    Mr. President,

    We are still awaiting concrete news on the issue of detainees, abductees and missing persons. Large-scale and unilateral releases as well as more meaningful actions on missing persons have never been more needed. I continue to urge the Syrian government and all other Syrian parties to step up their efforts in this regard.  I believe they could follow the example of those governments in the region and elsewhere who have already carried out large-scale releases on an exceptional basis as part of their pandemic response.

    The COVID-19 crisis has added a new layer to Syria’s grave and worsening economic predicament, the result of many internal and external factors and measures over a decade of conflict. The Syrian Pound has continued to depreciate in recent weeks, with implications on the purchasing power of ordinary Syrians. Significant price increases and shortages in basic commodities are widespread across the country, with implications for food security.

     

    Mr. President,

    We know that the crisis in Syria will not be resolved by a new constitution alone. But if the Constitutional Committee could work seriously, it could build trust, make an important contribution to a political settlement, and be a door-opener. I am ready to convene a third session of the Small Body of the Constitutional Committee in Geneva as soon as global travel conditions allow. We do not know, of course, when that will be. But let me stress, as both co-chairs have affirmed to me, the importance of a substantive third session on the agreed agenda and the equal importance of there being no preconditions to moving on to other items of the constitution in subsequent sessions, consistent with the mandate and Terms of Reference and Core Rules of Procedure.

    We remain in contact with both co-chairs as we assess when the next session will be possible. I also recently offered a briefing to the civil society members of the Small Body. Those who wished to attend and could do so were updated on the agenda agreed between the co-chairs. I believe that all three components of the Committee have been offered the information they need to prepare themselves for a substantive and forward-looking session when conditions permit.

     

    Mr. President,

    I have remained in close contact with the Syrian Women’s Advisory Board, whose members have been meeting virtually for the past several weeks. They emphasize the active leadership role that Syrian women are assuming in their communities, in a context of the severe economic crisis and humanitarian needs of Syrians across the country and beyond its borders. They have asked for special priority to help and protect the most vulnerable Syrians including refugees and internally displaced; children and the elderly; women who suffer from violence and abuse; and detainees and abductees who are now at greater risk because of the pandemic. They reiterate to me that a political process within the framework of resolution 2254 is the only way forward, with Syrian women as full partners at the table.

    I have also heard from a wide range of Syrian men and women, including civil society interlocutors across Syria and the region, via our Civil Society Support Room. Many continue to impress upon me their ability and desire to build bridges within Syrian society. Almost all of them perceive that the political process is not limited to the Constitutional Committee, and that all of it has stalled. All of them continue to highlight the critical importance of real progress on the file of detainees, abductees and the missing. Calls for accountability for serious offenses and violations of international law are often raised. All are concerned about the declining economic reality across Syria. Debates continue on the issue of sanctions. Many noted also that COVID-19 has created new stresses for Syrian refugees – and for the countries hosting them. All seek the emergence of tangible steps towards the creation of a safe, calm and neutral environment across Syria upon which a comprehensive and credible political solution can be built. These are the same conditions that would allow the safe, dignified, voluntary and well-informed return of refugees and internally displaced Syrians.

     

    Mr. President,

    Many civil society interlocutors also raised the issue of elections. We take note that parliamentary elections have been postponed, as one of the precautionary measures against the transmission of COVID-19 announced by the Syrian Government. I take this opportunity to note that these elections would be under the current constitutional framework. The United Nations is not specifically mandated nor have we been requested to engage on these elections. I remain focused, in the context of the UN-facilitated political process pursuant to resolution 2254, on working towards free and fair elections pursuant to a new constitution that are administered under UN supervision in accordance with the highest international standards of accountability and transparency and are inclusive of all eligible Syrians, including the diaspora.

     

    Mr. President,

    In conclusion, let us recall that there have been too many episodes in the past decade where fleeting opportunities to turn dynamics towards a political path were lost. Those missed moments were followed by renewed violence and a hardening of positions among regional and international actors. We must not repeat this pattern. With some calm, with the common threats of COVID and ISIS, and with the Syrian people continuing to suffer, I want to stress that renewed and meaningful international cooperation, building trust and confidence between international stakeholders and with Syrians, including through reciprocal measures, is essential -- and could unlock progress.

    I believe that Russian-American dialogue has a key role to play here, and I encourage them to pursue it. The states that discuss Syria in the Astana and Small Group formats are key players too, as are you the Members of this Council. Ultimately there is a need to come together to support a renewed effort in a Syrian-led, Syrian-owned, UN-facilitated political process guided by Security Council resolution 2254, towards a political settlement that can meet the legitimate aspirations of all Syrians and fully restore Syria’s sovereignty, unity, independence and territorial integrity.

     

  • 18 Mayo 2020

    ADDIS ABABA, 17 May 2020  – The African Union Commission and the Secretariat of the United Nations have been following the unfolding of the electoral campaign in Burundi and remain concerned about reports of intimidation and violent clashes between supporters of opposing sides.

    They call on Burundian authorities to provide a safe and secure environment which will allow Burundians to exercise their political and civil rights in tolerance, peace and mutual acceptance.

    ...
  • 18 Mayo 2020

    KABUL - Access to accurate information helps reduce anxiety and serves to empower Afghanistan’s communities in the fight against COVID-19, said participants in a recent series of...

  • 17 Mayo 2020

    New York, 18 May 2020

    Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen, dear colleagues and friends,

    Thank you for this opportunity to address you on the greatest challenge of our age. 

    The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated our global fragility.

    Despite the enormous scientific and technological advances of recent...

  • 17 Mayo 2020

    Ahead of presidential and local elections in Burundi on Wednesday, the African Union (AU) Commission and the United Nations (UN) urged the authorities to provide a safe and secure environment for citizens to cast their votes.

  • 17 Mayo 2020

    Since it first emerged at the start of 2020 as a global health crisis, COVID-19 has spread to nearly every country in the world.  Defined as the greatest challenge the world has faced in decades, the pandemic has...

  • 17 Mayo 2020

    KABUL - The UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) welcomes the agreement reached between President Ashraf Ghani and Dr Abdullah Abdullah, to resolve the political impasse and enable the...

  • 16 Mayo 2020

    New-York, 17 May 2020

    The world marks International Day against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia (IDAHOT) at a time of great challenge.

    Among the many severe impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic is the increased vulnerability of LGBTI people.  Already facing bias, attacks and murder simply for who they are or whom they love, many LGBTI people are experiencing heightened stigma as a...

  • 16 Mayo 2020

    New-York, 17 May, 2020

    Information technology can be a beacon of hope, allowing billions of people around the world to connect.During the COVID-19 pandemic, these connections – with loved ones, with schools and colleges, with workplaces, with healthcare professionals and essential supplies– are more important than ever.The International Telecommunication Union continues to work with the...

  • 16 Mayo 2020

    Interview of UN Special Coordinator for Lebanon Jan Kubis with Al-Jazeera

     

    Q: Do Lebanese authorities seem to understand that this time around there will be no blank checks?...

  • 15 Mayo 2020

    The country's health authorities are concerned about the level of social stigmatization associated with COVID-19.

    Some people suspected of having contracted COVID19...

  • 15 Mayo 2020

    Productive Sectors Development Essential for Achieving #TheLebanonWeWant

     

    Beirut, Lebanon

    Friday, 15 May 2020 (United Nations) – The Lebanese economy is suffering from the consequences of longstanding development challenges and multiples crises. Starting from the Syrian crisis in 2011, to the...

  • 15 Mayo 2020

     

    9 - 15 May 2020

    This Week in DPPA is a brief roundup of political and peacebuilding events and developments at UNHQ and around the world.

    COVID-19

    Stockholm Forum - DiCarlo calls on influential countries to do more to help silence the guns
    Under-Secretary-General Rosemary DiCarlo participated on 13 May in the Stockholm Forum, a yearly event …. The Under-Secretary-General spoke on the subject of 'Sustaining Peace in the Time of COVID-19'. She said 110 countries and 24 armed groups have backed Secretary-General António Guterres’ appeal for a global ceasefire. This broad support has not always led to results, she said, adding that to help silence the guns, countries with influence on warring parties, or supplying them with weapons, must do their part too.  
    Watch the event here 

     

    Afghanistan – Calls for solidarity amid concerns of rising domestic violence during COVID-19 
    Solidarity and compassion are crucial for families affected by domestic violence during COVID-19 pandemic, said participants in a recent series of UNAMA-backed radio programmes broadcast across Afghanistan. In the pre-recorded interactive shows, which have so far aired in twelve provinces, experts and radio hosts answered questions posed by local residents about the pandemic’s impact on their families and talked about ways to cope with the situation. 
    Read more here 

     
    Great Lakes – Advisory Board for Women, Peace and Security mobilize support in the fight against the pandemic  
    The 12th session of the Advisory Board for Women, Peace and Security in the Great Lakes region was held via video on 12 May to mobilize regional and international support in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic and help advance the women, peace and security (WPS) agenda. Special Envoy Huang Xia attended the meeting, and said that the global health emergency had hit the world and the Great Lakes region at a time his office was preparing to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Beijing Platform and the 20th anniversary of Security Council Resolution on Women, Peace and Security. 
    Read more here 

     

    West Africa - COVID-19 tests the region’s resilience  
    Mohamed Ibn Chambas, Special Representative and Head of UNOWAS, participated on 13 May in The Debate, a discussion programme on French broadcaster France 24. What has West Africa learned since the Ebola outbreak, when is the moment to ease lockdown, and what are the conditions for staging elections during the current crisis were among the issues discussed. Mr. Ibn Chambas said that this was not the ideal time to go to the polls, but he backed Benin’s decisions to stage local elections on 17 May.  
    Watch the debate here

     

    New report on impact of COVID-19   
    DPPA has prepared a new report on the impact of COVID-19 on its work, showing how the Department has adapted, in the field and at UN Headquarters, in order to continue providing support to Member States and partners. Our Special Envoys and Representatives are engaging with conflict parties, including through virtual platforms, to encourage reluctant conflict actors to move towards ceasefires and amplify the Secretary-General’s appeal made on 23 March. Request for our services – political analysis, mediation and electoral support – will remain high in the coming months, as we witness the full scale of COVID-19’s impact on the global economy and its social and political implications. While the priorities and commitments outlined in DPPA’s Strategic Plan remain unchanged, our activities under the Multi-Year Appeal (MYA) are constantly re-assessed to respond to the changing needs on the ground. While the competition for resources continues to intensify, the MYA is more important than ever for DPPA’s work since all crises – even this pandemic – have political ramifications and ultimately call for political solutions. 
    Read the report here


    For up-to-date information on COVID-19 and its impact, please visit:   
    WHO website  
    UN coronavirus website 

     

    Security Council

    Hennis-Plasschaert: “Iraq must move away from endless crisis management towards a more productive approach” 
    Special Representative Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert briefed the Security Council on the work of UNAMI in Iraq on 12 May. “Iraq must move away from endless crisis management towards a more productive approach, building resilience at both the state and society level. Short-term political and private calculations do not serve Iraq’s long-term interests, on the contrary. And yes, the challenges are many; but so are the opportunities,” Ms. Hennis-Plasschaert said. “I remain convinced that a more just, prosperous and resilient Iraq can emerge from the current compounded crises. But for that to happen, political will is fundamental,” she concluded.  
    Read her full remarks here 
    Read more in UN News  


     
     

    Griffiths expresses hope instead of reporting success  
    Special Envoy Martin Griffiths updated the Council on the situation in Yemen on 14 May. “I am coming to this Council yet again to express hope, instead of to report success. And this is frustrating, at a time when the spread of COVID-19 and a global economic downturn threaten to cause even more adversity in a country that has already experienced more than nearly any other,” Mr. Griffiths said. The Special Envoy was “extremely encouraged” that both the Yemeni Government and opposition Houthi rebels, have positively engaged with UN proposals, calling them “important indications” of their willingness to make the needed compromises for peace. 
    Read his full remarks here 
    Read more in UN News 

     

     

     

     

    Iraq

    Meeting with new Prime Minister 
    Special Representative Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert congratulated Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi on the formation of his government in a meeting on 12 May. Ms. Hennis-Plasschaert expressed hope for the speedy completion of the remaining posts, and underlined UNAMI’s support and readiness to work closely with the new government for the benefit of Iraq and its people. 
    For more Information, contact us 


    Central Asia

    Conference on preventive diplomacy 
    Natalia Gherman, Special Representative and Head of UNRCCA, took part in the video conference “Preventive Diplomacy: A Case of Turkmenistan, Afghanistan and UNRCCA”, on 14 May. The aim of the conference was to share academic knowledge and practical examples of preventive diplomacy, taking into consideration the regional developments. In her presentation, the Special Representative spoke about the creation of UNRCCA and presented preventive diplomacy actions taken by the Centre since 2008. Ms. Gherman also focused on the current priority areas and activities of UNRCCA in the field of counter-terrorism, transboundary water management and promoting preventive diplomacy tools among youth, making special reference to the Preventive Diplomacy Academy initiative.        
    Read more here 

     

    Cameroon

    Special Representative meets with President  
    François Louncény Fall, Special Representative for Central Africa and Head of UNOCA, met with President Paul Biya of Cameroon on 13 May. They discussed the situation in Cameroon and Central Africa, region integration, and the fight against COVID-19. President Biya shared his analysis and advice on how to address the challenges to peace and security in the sub-region.  
    For more Information, contact us
     

    Colombia 

    Women leaders and human rights defenders meet with UN Mission and UN Women in Colombia 
    The UN Verification Mission and UN Women in Colombia convened a meeting on 14 May with women leaders and human rights defenders from different departments affected by the conflict to discuss the challenges they are currently facing in their territories. Special Representative Carlos Ruiz Massieu recognized their commitment to representing the interest of their communities, and for continuing to advance in peacebuilding. "I recognize the territorial efforts of Putumayo, Montes de Maria, and Magdalena to maintain the functioning of the Territorial Forums for the Security of Women Leaders and Defenders. I call for no effort to be spared to guarantee the security of women leaders and human rights defenders, to avoid impacting the progress made so far on the agenda of Women, Peace, and Security in Colombia,” he said.  The women highlighted critical issues they faced on lack of connectivity, security threats and the increase of gender-based violence as main challenges to advance their work and participation in the current context for the implementation of the peace process. Also participating in the meeting were Alberto Brunori, representative of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights in Colombia; Jessica Faieta, UN Resident Coordinator a.i. in Colombia, and Ana Guezmes, UN Women's Representative in Colombia, along with representatives of the Public Ministry. 
    For more Information, contact us
     

    Peacebuilding   

    Online consultations in Somalia 
    In Somalia, the UN Peacebuilding Fund on 14 May concluded an online consultation process on peacebuilding priorities to guide the PBF’s support for the next five years. The consultation targeted the general public through a social media-based platform that engaged close to 400 Somalis across the country. Input from the public informed a closed phase for 70 participants from government, civil society, diplomatic community, and the UN who engaged using an online learning platform called Canvas and by two live calls using Zoom. Reconciliation, justice, governance, and security emerged as the top priorities for peacebuilding. 
    For more Information, contact us 

     

    PBC meeting on Papua New Guinea 
    A Peacebuilding Commission (PBC) Ambassadorial-level meeting was convened on 12 May to discuss Deputy Secretary General (DSG) Amina J. Mohammed’s visit to Papua New Guinea (PNG) in March and recent developments in the country, including in light of COVID-19. Member States from the region, the Chairman of the Bougainville Referendum Commission, UN Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States (UN-OHRLLS), Assistant Secretary-General for Middle East, Asia and the Pacific and Assistant Secretary-General for Peacebuilding Support also attended. The DSG highlighted the UN-EU spotlight initiative, which fights violence against women and girls, and stressed the role of gender equality in building peace, achieving sustainable development, and fighting climate change.  
    For more Information, contact us 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • 15 Mayo 2020
    Regional unity is the strength against the pandemic in West Africa and the Sahel. But be careful not to forget fundamental human rights.

    In the face of the unprecedented health crisis that is...

  • 14 Mayo 2020

    The World Health Organization (WHO) was on Thursday seeking to clarify why authorities in Burundi have expelled its top official in the country and three other staff members, the UN agency’s Regional Director for Africa told journalists during a press briefing on COVID-19.

  • 14 Mayo 2020

    UN Special Envoy for war-weary Yemen, Martin Griffiths, told the Security Council on Thursday, that he believed an end to the fighting “is within close reach”, but cautioning that he had come “yet again to express hope, instead of to report success”.

  • 14 Mayo 2020

    UN Special Envoy for war-weary Yemen, Martin Griffiths, told the Security Council on Thursday, that he had been in intensive negotiations with the warring parties in Yemen over a lasting peace deal, with "significant progress" made, especially towards making the UN's call for a complete silencing of the guns, a reality.

  • 14 Mayo 2020

    Mogadishu– The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has had tremendous impact on all areas of Somali...

  • 13 Mayo 2020

    Decades of neglect and underinvestment in addressing people’s mental health needs have been exposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the UN said on Thursday, in a call for ambitious commitments from countries in the way they treat psychological illness, amid a potential global spike in suicides and drug abuse.

  • 13 Mayo 2020

    Statement of the International Support Group

    Beirut, 13 May 2020

     

    The ISG takes due note of the unanimous adoption by the Government of Lebanon of its Financial Recovery Plan as a constructive framework for future reforms as well as its...

  • 13 Mayo 2020

    The South Sudanese Government has confirmed that two cases of COVID-19 have been identified inside a Protection of Civilians (PoC) site in the capital, Juba, although the world’s youngest nation has been relatively unscathed by the pandemic, with 74 cases recorded so far.

  • 13 Mayo 2020

    ASHGABAT, Turkmenistan

    On 14 May 2020, SRSG Natalia Gherman took part in the video...

  • 13 Mayo 2020

     

     

    New-York, 13 May 2020

    Mental health is at the core of our humanity.

    It enables us to lead rich and fulfilling lives and to participate in our communities

    But the COVID-19 virus is not only attacking our physical health; it is also increasing psychological suffering....

  • 13 Mayo 2020

    UNSOM Quarterly Newsletter, Issue 14

     

  • 13 Mayo 2020

    KABUL - Solidarity and compassion are crucial for families affected by domestic violence during COVID-19 pandemic, said participants in a recent series of UNAMA-backed radio programmes broadcast across...

  • 12 Mayo 2020

    Perpetrators behind two separate deadly attacks in Afghanistan on Tuesday must be brought to justice, top UN officials have said.

  • 12 Mayo 2020

    Despite compounding crises that include the COVID-19 pandemic and plummeting oil revenues, a more prosperous and inclusive Iraq can be achieved provided the political will is there, the top UN official in the country told the Security Council during a virtual meeting held on Tuesday.

  • 12 Mayo 2020

    Participants listening to the UN Special Envoy for the Great Lakes region, Huang Xia (with glasses on the right-bottom), during the 12th session of the Advisory Board for Women, Peace and Security...

  • 12 Mayo 2020

    NEW YORK - The Secretary-General strongly condemns the horrific attack today on a hospital in Kabul, which killed and wounded dozens of people, including women and children. He is also following with concern the...

  • 11 Mayo 2020

     

    New York, 12 May 2020

    Let me begin by thanking Ambassador Omar Hilale of the Kingdom of Morocco for this very timely initiative. It is heartening to see so many religious leaders joining forces today in a spirit of solidarity.Our world faces a crisis like no other.  The COVID-19 pandemic is not just a global health emergency. It is...

  • 11 Mayo 2020

    Three UN peacekeepers from Chad were killed in northern Mali on Sunday when their convoy hit a roadside bomb near Aguelhok, in the restive Kidal region. The improvised device also seriously injured four others who are now receiving medical care, the UN Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) said in a statement. 

  • 9 Mayo 2020

    Bogotá, 9 May 2020 - The UN Verification Mission in Colombia condemns the murder of Wilder Daniel Marín Alarcón, a member of the Revolutionary Alternative Force of the Common (FARC) party, occurred on 7 May in the municipality of Bello, Antioquia. With Wilder, there are already 24 cases of murders, in 2020, of those who are committed to their process of reincorporation.

    During the COVID-19 context, violence in the conflict-affected areas has continued. Since the...

  • 9 Mayo 2020

    The UN Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) has condemned several recent attacks on civilian areas of the Libyan Capital, Tripoli, which have reportedly caused deaths and injuries.

  • 8 Mayo 2020

    On 8 and 9 May, the UN commemorates the millions who lost their lives during the Second World War, the tragic conflict that led to the birth of the United Nations. In a video message released late on Friday, UN chief António Guterres warned that divisions still exist, and called for a world based on peace and unity.

  • 8 Mayo 2020

    The COVID-19 outbreak could trigger a humanitarian catastrophe in Haiti, endangering many years of hard-won progress in the Caribbean nation, the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) said on Friday.

  • 8 Mayo 2020

    The concern about the spread of COVID-19 is also present in the reintegration areas. They are facing challenges and have closed their borders.

    The virtual world and isolation have...

  • 8 Mayo 2020

    TRIPOLI, 08 May 2020 - UNSMIL strongly condemns increased attacks on civilian populated areas in Tripoli, including the appalling shelling yesterday on Tripoli’s...

  • 8 Mayo 2020

    As civilian casualties mount across Syria and human rights violations continue unabated, the UN rights chief expressed serious concern on Friday that some parties to the conflict, including ISIL terrorist fighters, may be using the COVID-19 pandemic as “an opportunity to regroup and inflict violence on the population”.  

  • 8 Mayo 2020

     

    2 - 8 May 2020

    This Week in DPPA is a brief roundup of political and peacebuilding events and developments at UNHQ and around the world.

    COVID-19

    Colombia: Need to put the armed conflict on lockdown
    Inspector General Fernando Carrillo convened a virtual session on 6 May. "The Table for the Protection of Life" assessed the risk situation facing social leaders in the territories in relation to the confinement ordered to prevent the spread of the COVID-19. In his speech, Special Representative Carlos Ruiz Massieu said that: "Without a doubt, COVID-19 has impacted and will continue to impact the implementation of the Peace Agreement. But it is precisely this context that offers us an opportunity to focus attention on the most essential priorities, such as security: the security of communities, of social leaders, of people participating in programs that support the implementation of the Agreement, including those who participate in voluntary crop substitution programs.” He also reiterated the call for a ceasefire for armed groups: "Colombia needs to put the armed conflicts on lockdown, suspend them and focus together on the real struggle of our lives, privileging life above any other consideration.”
    Representatives of social organizations, including Leyner Palacios, social leader of Bojayá; Mayerlis Angarita, of the organization Narrar para Vivir; Patricia Riveros, human rights defender; Yuri Quintero, of the Putumayo Human Rights Network; Juan Carlos Quintero, of the Catatumbo Peasant Association, and Juana Ruíz, of the Mampuján Weavers, assessed the difficult security situation their territories face.


    Guinea-Bissau: Mainstreaming gender in COVID response  
    UNIOGBIS’s Gender Unit has engaged the Women's Network for Peace and Security in the ECOWAS Space (REMPSECAO) to assist municipal authorities in the relocation of part of the Old Downtown Women’s Market to a less central location. This is done to prevent crowding, making it easier to maintain recommended social distancing and hygiene practices. The project entails well-designed and distanced market stalls, queuing place posts, and health education boxes at the entrance and exit of the market run by women and youth volunteers. These are equipped with washing facilities and information materials. 
    Read more here 


     

    Peacebuilding: Joint blogpost on COVID-19 in fragile settings 
    Oscar Fernandez-Taranco, UN Assistant Secretary-General, and Franck Bousquet, World Bank Senior Director for Fragility, Conflict and Violence jointly wrote a blogpost on COVID-19 in Fragile Settings: Ensuring a Conflict-Sensitive Response. Building on Pathways for Peace, a joint United Nations–World Bank Group study, the blogpost provides principles to guide country-level response efforts in conflict-affected settings: (1) Conflict sensitivity matters as COVID-19 interacts with existing inequalities, grievances, and capacity gaps – and could create openings for peace exemplified in the global ceasefire; (2) the importance of trust and inclusion in the responses; (3) maintaining engagement with communities; (4) the importance of partnerships across humanitarian, development and peace actors. The blog further calls for collective support to countries to build back better.  
    Read more here

     

    Central African Republic: Impact of COVID-19 on upcoming elections   
    A Peacebuilding Commission Ambassadorial-level meeting was convened on 7 may to discuss the impact of COVID-19 on the legislative and presidential elections planned for 2020-2021 in the Central African Republic (CAR). H.E. Mr. Augustin Yangana, Minister of Territorial Administration and Decentralization, presented the Government’s plans for electoral preparations and highlighted resource limitations at the local level as a continued barrier against inclusive and orderly elections. Bintou Keita, Assistant Secretary-General for Africa, recalled the Secretary-General’s call for global ceasefire and underlined the flexible and important role of the Peacebuilding Fund. Mankeur Ndiaye, Special Representative of UN Secretary-General in Central African Republic and Head of UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA) reaffirmed the Mission’s commitment to create an environment conducive to peaceful elections and commended the electoral calendar that adheres to the constitutional timelines. The World Bank announced its funding support for electoral and COVID-19-related expenditures, including an emergency social protection package in July, building on strengthened cooperation with the UN and the government. Member States reiterated the need to adhere to the SG’s call for a global ceasefire and the provisions of the peace agreement, including timely, inclusive, secure and credible elections. They also recognized the resource challenges for the elections compounded by the COVID-19 pandemic and committed to provide stronger support. 
    For more Information, contact us


    For up-to-date information on COVID-19 and its impact, please visit:   
    WHO website  
    UN coronavirus website 

     

    Security Council

    High-level meeting on the 75th Anniversary of the End of the Second World War in Europe 
    Under-Secretary-General Rosemary DiCarlo took part in a Security Council Arria-formula meeting on 8 May. The high-level meeting on the 75th Anniversary of the End of World War II in Europe, a signature event of Estonia’s Security Council presidency, brought together nearly 50 foreign ministers. “As we look back on the lessons of the past 75 years, we must find opportunity in this time of crisis, to put aside our differences and strengthen the channels for dialogue and cooperation. We must also exercise the solidarity needed to help the more vulnerable countries respond to the challenges they are now facing, understanding that their security and well-being affects us all. We must also find that community of purpose that existed in the immediate post-war period,” Ms. DiCarlo said in her remarks.  
    Read her full remarks here 
    Watch the meeting here 
    Learn more about Arria-formula meetings here

     

     

     

    Women, Peace and Security 

    Webinar on women’s participation in peace processes  
    Assistant Secretary-General for Europe, Central Asia and the Americas Miroslav Jenča  and Syria Envoy Geir O. Pedersen attended a webinar on women’s participation in peace processes during the COVID-19 pandemic on 6 May, hosted by the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In his remarks, Assistant Secretary-General Jenča highlighted the  positive example of Colombia, where the UN is using digital platforms to continue engagements with women leaders. “If you don't have women at the negotiation table, you will not be able to work out a sustainable peace arrangement," Special Envoy Pedersen said when he talked about the ongoing peace process in Syria.   
    Watch the webinar here


    World Press Freedom Day 

    Guinea-Bissau  
    World Press Freedom Day was commemorated on 3 May. “In the past two years the work of journalists in Guinea-Bissau has been marked by episodes that injure Press Freedom, based on verbal attacks, insults on social media, intimidation and physical aggression. These factors are compounded by the poor financial conditions of the Media, which translates in a clear dependence of journalists from political and economic power”, Indira Correia Baldé, President of the Bissau-Guinean journalist union SINJOTECS, said in a statement. SINJOTECS is one of the implementing partners of a project that supports the media sector in Guinea-Bissau - “Boosting the media sector for greater peace and stability in Guinea-Bissau” - financed by the United Nations Peacebuilding Fund, implemented by UNIOGBIS and UNDP. 
    Read more here 
     

    Libya 
    UNSMIL issued a statement on 3 May.  “An independent media, free from intimidation and threats, is crucial to laying the foundations of democracy,” Acting Special Representative Stephanie Williams said. “I call on the Libyan authorities and all parties to the conflict to protect journalists and media workers, guarantee the right to freedom of opinion and expression, including the right to seek, receive, and impart information to the public.”  
    Read more here  
     
    Somalia 
    On the occasion of World Press Freedom Day, James Swan, Special Representative and Head of UNSOM, called for Somali journalists to be able to perform their work freely. 
    “The media have a vital role to play in Somali society, from coverage of its political space to giving a voice to the vulnerable and marginalized. They need to be able to carry out their important work free from violence, harassment, detention, persecution, intimidation and censorship,” Mr. Swan said in a statement.  
    Read more here 

    In conjunction with the Press Freedoam Day, UNSOM published an interview with  Farhia Mohamed Kheyre, founder of Somali Women Journalists (SWJ). “I was born into war and brought up in war. I know how it is to be vulnerable and to yearn for a better life. The conflicts changed the social fabric of Somali society. Vulnerable groups like women continued to be marginalized. I still experience it first-hand as a female journalist. That’s what led me to journalism in the first place – that is, to tell their stories – and now to activism,” she says. “I stand for female journalists’ rights, come what may.” 
    Read more here 



    Afghanistan  
    “Afghanistan can be justly proud that it has one of the most pluralistic and flourishing media sectors in southeast Asia. It is an achievement all the more striking given where press freedom stood in the country less than a generation ago,” Deborah Lyons, Special Representative and Head of UNAMA, said in a statement on World Press Freedom Day. “The United Nations remains firm in its position that media freedoms must be protected as part of any peace process.” 
    Read more here 
     
    Iraq 
    "On World Press Freedom Day, we salute journalists on the frontlines in Iraq and beyond. Reliable reporting allows the public to make informed decisions and hold leaders accountable. This is never more important than during times of crisis,” Special Representative and Head of UNAMI Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert said in a tweet on 3 May.  

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    Contact DPPA at dppa@un.org

  • 8 Mayo 2020

    UN Secretary-General António Guterres is calling for concerted global action to quash the “tsunami” of hate speech that has risen alongside the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • 8 Mayo 2020

    Under Secretary-General Rosemary A. DiCarlo's remarks at the Arria Formula meeting on “Seventy-five years from the end of the Second World War on European Soil - lessons learned for preventing future atrocities, responsibility of the Security Council”

    Thank you, Mr. Minister, for the invitation to participate in today’s meeting to commemorate 75 years since the end of the Second World War in Europe. This is another opportunity to reflect on the toll of that horrific conflict and its legacy, for Europe and the world.

    It is both poignant and ironic that we are not able to meet in person today, because we are facing one of the greatest challenges to humanity since the end of the Second World War. How we react to the new challenge before us - the COVID-19 pandemic - could be as significant as how the world rebuilt after fascism was vanquished.

    In May 1945, visionary leaders chose multilateralism and international cooperation over division and isolation. A choice that led to the establishment of the United Nations Organization.

    These same leaders created a rules-based system with mechanisms to resolve differences peacefully, and all committed to the principle of collective security. The rules-based system was also built on the respect of human rights and human dignity, a necessary value to overcome the legacy of the Holocaust and atrocities of the conflict.

    European countries played a large role in this architecture.  For the past 75 years, the countries of Europe have been stalwart supporters both of multilateralism and conflict prevention, lending indispensable support to the United Nations.

    The creation of the European Economic Community and European Union signalled that countries would put aside their differences and work toward a more prosperous future of benefit to all members. And the adoption of the Helsinki Accords and the establishment of the Organization of Cooperation and Security in Europe was key to reducing tensions between East and West during the post-War period.

    And while this system created after the war has brought relative peace to Europe and other parts of the world, tensions and violent conflicts persist, including in Europe.

    Preventing and resolving violent conflicts around the world is at the heart of the United Nations peace and security pillar. The Secretary-General has made prevention one of his highest priorities, including the full and effective implementation of the women, peace and security agenda.

    His vision focuses on the need to mitigate wider stressors and shocks that can lead to political crises and violent conflict. He has repeatedly called for a “surge in diplomacy for peace”.

    In his briefing to the Security Council on “Conflicts in Europe” at the beginning of his tenure, the Secretary-General urged all stakeholders to intensify their efforts to define a peace and security agenda that could effectively address current complex challenges.

    I would like to recall his appeal to the Security Council for an honest reflection on the conflicts in the region. Europe is not immune from instability, and we should not take peace and prosperity in the region for granted.

    The United Nations contributed to bringing an end to brutal wars in the Western Balkans in the 1990s.  And yet, full peace and reconciliation have still not been achieved there. Meanwhile, there remain several protracted conflicts on the continent, and the crises in Georgia in 2008 and in Ukraine in 2014 showed that new outbreaks of violence were all too possible. 

    Meanwhile, seventy-five years since the end of the war, we are hearing disturbing echoes of the past. The voices of populism, authoritarianism, nationalism, and xenophobia are making themselves heard ever more loudly. We must confront those who would drag the world back to a violent and shameful past.

    The United Nations continues to engage in peace efforts in Europe, including negotiations to reach a comprehensive and durable settlement to the long-standing Cyprus question. We are also working with regional organizations in the Geneva International Discussions.

    In addition, we fully support the lead role and vital work of  the Normandy Four and Trilateral Contact Group for Ukraine, the OSCE-led Minsk Group Co-Chairs process on Nagorno-Karabakh, the OSCE-led “5+2” settlement process for Transnistria, and the EU-led Belgrade-Pristina dialogue. It is time to find negotiated solutions to these conflicts and build lasting peace. This will require political will, courage and leadership by all concerned. 

    Yes, this is easier said than done. But if ever there was a time to look beyond narrow interests, this is it. Europe, with international help, built a more prosperous and peaceful future after the cataclysm of the war three quarters of a century ago.

    Today, a deadly pandemic threatens us all. But it also gives us an opportunity to unite our efforts to first overcome the crisis and then create a more equitable and peaceful world.

     

    Mr. Minister

    Recognizing the unprecedented global challenge of COVID-19, the Secretary-General called on 23 March for a global ceasefire. He urged all warring parties to silence their guns in order to facilitate conditions for the delivery of humanitarian aid, create the space for diplomatic engagement, and address the needs of those most vulnerable to the pandemic.  

    His appeal has garnered endorsements from many Member States, regional organizations, religious leaders and civil society platforms, as well as several armed groups. The voice of European Member States has been critical in amplifying this call.

    Regrettably, in many places, support for the Secretary-General’s call has yet to translate into tangible results. We need a concerted international effort to move conflict parties to stop the fighting, especially as the pandemic injects countries with far-reaching humanitarian, socio-economic and potentially political consequences.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has indeed highlighted, once again, the importance of working collectively.  When the Secretary-General decided last year that the UN would mark its 75th anniversary by looking forward not backward to what citizens around the world expected from the United Nations of the future, no one could have predicted we would be facing a crisis of this scale.

    Out of concern that the world was growing more divided, the Secretary-General called for a return to the spirit of the Charter, to “We the peoples”, to renew international cooperation.

    As we look back on the lessons of the past 75 years, we must find opportunity in this time of crisis, to put aside our differences and strengthen the channels for dialogue and cooperation.  We must also exercise the solidarity needed to help the more vulnerable countries respond to the challenges they are now facing, understanding that their security and well-being affects us all. We must also find that community of purpose that existed in the immediate post-war period.

    This is essential for safeguarding lasting peace and stability, in Europe and beyond. 

    Thank you, Mr. Minister

  • 8 Mayo 2020

    UN and Partners in Lebanon Launch Emergency Appeal for US$350 million to Respond to Immediate Impact of COVID-19

    ...
  • 8 Mayo 2020

    Ashgabat, TURKMENISTAN

    Special Representative of the Secretary- General for Central Asia, Natalia Gherman, on behalf of the Secretary-General, Antonio Gutterres, expressed support to the collaborative efforts of Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan aimed at mitigating the consequences of the breach at the Sardoba dam that happened on 1 May.

    High-level interaction and the personal attention of...