Bienvenidos a las Naciones Unidas

Reports and Policy Documents

2020

  • 24 Abr 2020

    The “exceptional circumstances” of the COVID-19 pandemic have impacted the peace process in Sudan as well as the drawing down of the United Nations mission there, the head of UN peacekeeping updated the Security Council on Friday.

  • 24 Abr 2020

    The Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary General for West Africa and...

  • 24 Abr 2020

    Briefing to the Security Council on Sudan by Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs Rosemary A. DiCarlo

     

    Thank you, Mr. President, for the opportunity to brief the Security Council on the way forward for the United Nations engagement in Sudan.

    Six months after the establishment of the Transition, Sudan continues to face significant challenges.

    Sudan’s political fragility has been brought into focus with recent protests by elements affiliated with the former regime, as well as by security incidents like the mid-January protest of former intelligence operatives that led to violent confrontations in Khartoum.  USG Lacroix has already mentioned the assassination attempt against Prime Minister Hamdok.

    The humanitarian situation in the country remains worrisome.  The number of people who need humanitarian assistance across Sudan increased from about 8 million to 9.3 million by the end of 2019. Needs are largely driven by a deepening economic crisis.

    Structural flaws in Sudan’s economy have driven up the rate of inflation and hampered Sudan’s ability to import needed commodities. This has directly affected Sudan’s population, with people facing long lines for bread and petrol due to shortages of wheat and fuel. Last week, Prime Minister Hamdok warned that the transition could collapse without quick economic support.

    With the risk of a wider spread of COVID-19 in Sudan, the economic challenges could worsen. The Secretary-General has encouraged the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund to show flexibility in granting Sudan exceptional access to financial instruments established to assist developing countries respond to the challenges of COVID-19.

    The situation in Sudan is clearly dire and the need for support is real and urgent. Prime Minister Hamdok has written twice to the Secretary-General to ask for the establishment of a political and peacebuilding mission that would support Sudanese efforts to overcome specific challenges.  When I visited Khartoum in February, the Prime Minister and key stakeholders in the country, including civil society groups, conveyed a similar request to me.

    As a response to these requests, Mr. Nicholas Haysom, the Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on Sudan, was deployed to Khartoum in early March and has been working tirelessly to provide political support and to advocate with major international partners the need to generate as much assistance as possible for Sudan as soon as possible.

    In parallel, we have been working on planning the future Mission. In the Special Report submitted on 12 March to the Security Council, the Secretary-General and the Chairperson of the African Union Commission recommended the establishment of a follow-on presence with a Sudan-wide mandate. The mission’s objective would be to support Sudan in successfully completing its transition.  It would provide an effective response to the support needs outlined by Prime Minister Hamdok in his two letters to the Secretary-General. These include:

    1. Supporting the achievement of the political benchmarks contained in the Constitutional Declaration;
    2. Supporting the implementation of peace agreements in the conflict-affected areas;
    3. Supporting national-led peacebuilding and the strengthening of human rights and rule of law institutions;
    4. Facilitating international support for economic reforms setting Sudan on a path to sustainable development.

    The protection of civilians is also an area of focus. We believe that it requires a comprehensive approach in order to be effective in the long-term. Therefore, it will be an integral part of our peacebuilding efforts in Sudan. It is crucial that we work closely with Sudanese authorities and that we assist them in discharging their protection responsibility.

    Besides seeking an integration of the Mission and the UN Country Team under a single leadership, we envisage a future UN presence that is lean, effective and innovative in employing and coordinating resources across the United Nations system. Gender equality and the implementation of the women, peace and security agenda, will be a strong cross-cutting priority.

     

    Mr. President,

    Given the urgent need to establish as soon as possible a presence on the ground to support the transition, USG Lacroix and I have instructed a team of UN colleagues to lead a multi-disciplinary inter-agency planning exercise over the coming weeks.  This team will develop a framework for the future UN presence in Sudan, based on the guiding principles contained in the Special Report. We have also conveyed to the African Union Commissioner for Peace and Security an invitation for the African Union to join the planning exercise as a key partner.

    As our team has been unable to travel to Sudan because of  restrictions imposed following the outbreak of COVID-19, we decided to launch the planning exercise of the future Mission from New York, with members of the team convening in virtual format from their respective locations, including New York, Khartoum, Addis and elsewhere. The team is expected to physically deploy to Sudan as soon as the situation allows in order to refine and validate the outcome of the planning exercise with key Sudanese stakeholders including the Transitional Government of Sudan, civil society organizations, political parties, women and youth groups.

     

    Mr. President,

    We should do everything we can to support the transition and the Sudanese people in addressing the existing challenges. I trust we all share this sense of urgency and collective responsibility to enable the success of the truly historic transition in Sudan. The Secretary-General attaches utmost importance to this endeavor and looks forward to working closely with the Security Council to make that happen.

    I thank you, Mr. President.

  • 24 Abr 2020

     

    18 - 24 April 2020

    This Week in DPPA is a brief roundup of political and peacebuilding events and developments at UNHQ and around the world.

    COVID-19

    Geneva International Discussions
    In a statement on 18 April, the Co-Chairs of the Geneva International Discussions (GID) strongly urged all GID participants to set aside differences and to refrain from actions that could lead to increased tension. “The focus should be on collaboration, for the good of all people in the region and against the common threat of the COVID-19 pandemic. The reported erection of signs along the South Ossetian dividing line today predictably contributes to a tense atmosphere on the ground and rids the local people of their livelihoods,” the statement said.
    Read the full statement here


    Somalia - Meeting between the Prime Minister and international partners
    The UN in Somalia facilitated a briefing with Prime Minister Hassan Ali Khayre and 25 international partners on 21 April. The Prime Minister and his cabinet updated on Somalia’s COVID-19 response, and the partners pledged their solidarity and willingness to support. Special Representative James Swan attended the briefing on behalf of UNSOM.
    For more Information, contact us


     

    Gabon – Donations from UN staff to help families in Libreville 
    François Louncény Fall, Special Representative and Head of UNOCA, handed over donations from UN staff in Gabon to the Senior Minister in charge of Foreign Affairs on 22 April. The donations consisted of ten tons of rice, soap bars and bottles of bleach, meant to help the neediest families in Libreville address COVID-19 challenges.
    For more Information, contact us



    Colombia - During the pandemic, hope is sown in Carrizal
    Former FARC combatants from Carrizal, Remedios (Antioquia) planted 10,000 native trees on 22 April. On this year’s International Mother Earth Day, all attention was focused on the COVID-19 pandemic. But there is another profound emergency: the planetary environmental crisis. People in the process of reintegration are also advancing in an environmental protection plan that involves the community and victims of the conflict. This is possible thanks to the accompaniment of several universities (Uniciencia, Universidad Nacional, Universidad de Antioquia), local authorities, the Agency for Reintegration and Normalization (ARN), public forces, social organizations, and the UN Verification Mission in Colombia.
    For more Information, contact us

     

    West Africa and the Sahel - Peacebuilding Commission meeting
    Marc-André Blanchard, Permanent Representative of Canada, chaired a virtual Peacebuilding Commission (PBC) meeting at the ambassadorial level on the impact of COVID-19 on peacebuilding and sustaining peace in West Africa and the Sahel. Special Representative Mohammed Ibn Chambas and Assistant Secretary-Genereal for Peacebuilding Support Oscar Fernandez-Taranco briefed the Commission. Mr. Ibn Chambas emphasized the importance of supporting governance structures to adequately respond to this challenge in the short, medium and long term and stressed the need for concerted efforts to ensure that there is consensus in addressing the implications of COVID-19 on electoral processes in the region. Mr. Fernandez-Taranco informed of ongoing efforts of the UN system and related adjustment of the Peacebuilding Fund, in coordination with other UN funds.
    For more Information, contact us

    For up-to-date information on COVID-19 and its impact, please visit:   
    WHO website  
    UN coronavirus website 

     

    Security Council

    Huang Xia: “Determined and united, we will defeat COVID-19"
    Huang Xia, Special Envoy for the Great Lakes, presented the report on the Implementation of the Peace, Security and Cooperation Framework for the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Region to the Security Council on 22 April. The Special Envoy also spoke about the ongoing pandemic, saying that: “Determined and united, we will defeat COVID-19.”  He urged all stakeholders to come together in the fight against the virus.
    Watch the briefing here
    Read more in UN News (French)

    Climate change multiplying factors that lead to insecurity for millions, Rosemary DiCarlo tells “Arria Formula” meeting
    Under-Secretary-General Rosemary DiCarlo, on 22 April, addressed an “Arria Formula” meeting on “Climate and Security risks: the latest data. What can the UN do to prevent climate-related conflicts and how can we climate-proof UN in-country activities?” “While climate change is rarely the main driver of conflict, it multiplies existing risks and exacerbates factors that we know can lead to insecurity. The manifestation of these linkages is highly specific to context,” Ms. DiCarlo said. The meeting was hosted by the Permanent Mission of France to the UN, and can be viewed on the Mission’s Facebook page.
    Read her full remarks here

     

     

     

     

     

    Special Coordinator encouraged by cooperation to fight COVID-19
    Special Coordinator Nickolay Mladenov briefed the Council on the situation in the Middle East, including the Palestinian question, on 23 April. “Despite these worrying developments, I am encouraged that the COVID-19 crisis has also created some opportunities for cooperation. I hope that these opportunities will not be undermined or destroyed if the political context between Israel and the Palestinian Authority deteriorates,” Mr. Mladenov said. “I strongly urge Israeli and Palestinian leaders to seize this moment to take steps towards peace, to reject unilateral moves that will only deepen the wedge between the two peoples and undermine the chances for peace,” the Special Coordinator encouraged.
    Read his full remarks here
    Read more in UN News

     

    DiCarlo: “We should do everything we can to support the transition and the Sudanese people”
    Under-Secretaries-General Rosemary DiCarlo and Jean-Pierre Lacroix briefed the Council on Sudan on 24 April, focusing on continued support to the country’s transition. “The situation in Sudan is clearly dire and the need for support is real and urgent,” Ms. DiCarlo said. The establishment of a new UN Mission to support the transition in Sudan is taking place, despite difficulties related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Under-Secretaries-General DiCarlo and Lacroix have instructed a team to lead a multi-disciplinary inter-agency planning exercise over the coming weeks to develop a framework for future UN presence in Sudan. “We should do everything we can to support the transition and the Sudanese people in addressing the existing challenges,” Under-Secretary-General DiCarlo concluded.
    Read her full remarks here

     

    Talking Prevention 

    This first edition of the Talking Prevention series, focusing on DPPA’s innovation work, took place via video conference on 24 April. DPPA's newly established Innovation Cell gave an overview of ongoing projects and areas of technology partnerships and the Mediation Support Unit briefed on its deepening engagement with the applicability of digital tools to its work. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, innovative and digital approaches to prevention, mediation and peacebuilding have become even more relevant. The new context has made direct interaction, including traditional shuttle diplomacy with conflict parties and peace constituencies, difficult.  This puts new technologies for safe and comprehensive dialogue at the forefront of diplomacy and mediation. DPPA has been working on a series of tools, including digital focus groups and social media mining to support its work, while also developing its knowledge of both the possibilities and limitations of digital communication in peace process engagement.
    Read more about our Innovation Cell here
    For more Information, contact us


    Ramadan 

    Yemen
    At the start of the Holy month of Ramadan, Special Envoy Martin Griffiths extended his best wishes to everyone in Yemen in a statement on 23 April. “To the people of Yemen: I wish Ramadan brings you its gifts of peace, reconciliation and joy. I hope you will continue to raise your voices to demand peace and to defend your right to a better future,” Mr. Griffiths said.
    Read the full statement here

    Afghanistan
    Special Representative and Head of UNAMA Deborah Lyons issued a statement on behalf of the UN family in Afghanistan, where she extended her warmest wishes to all Afghans as the month of Ramadan begins. “The period ahead is a special time of prayer and reflection, as well as a time to show compassion for the most vulnerable members of society. I hope that Ramadan will provide an opportunity for all communities in Afghanistan to strengthen their bonds with each other in solidarity,” the Special Representative said.  
    Read the full statement here

    Iraq
    Special Representative and Head of UNAMI Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert extended her best wishes for a peaceful, healthy Ramadan in a statement on 23 April. “The holy month of Ramadan is a time for peace and reflection which Muslims dedicate to praying and fasting, emphasizing forgiveness and charity towards those less fortunate. As COVID-19 continues to take a heavy economic and emotional toll in Iraq and around the globe, with lockdowns, curfews, and physical distancing, Ramadan remains an opportunity to pause, cherish what we have, look after each other and find peace of mind. The UN family in Iraq wishes you a safe and healthy Ramadan. Better days lie ahead,” Ms. Hennis-Plasschaert said. 


    Somalia
    The United Nations in Somalia extended its warmest wishes to all Somalis as the holy month of Ramadan began. “The holy month of Ramadan is a special time for solidarity and kindness; reflection and renewal. With the start of Ramadan in 2020, we are all acutely aware that Somalia – and the entire world – faces a myriad of challenges in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic. During this difficult period, the values of this occasion – centred around peace, compassion and an end to suffering – are ever more important,” said Special Representative James Swan in a statement on 24 April.
    Read the full statement here

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    Contact DPPA at dppa@un.org

  • 24 Abr 2020

    The senior UN official in Kosovo is stressing that strong leadership and political unity are needed now more than ever, as local leaders and their international partners wage war on the “enormous challenge” posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.  

  • 24 Abr 2020

    The socioeconomic impact of the new coronavirus pandemic is already being felt worldwide, including Guinea-Bissau, due to the preventive measures adopted by governments and the very...

  • 24 Abr 2020

    PRESS RELEASE

    UN supports education authorities in Lebanon to ensure continuity of education, inclusion and...

  • 24 Abr 2020

    Informal workers who live day to day urgently need cash support from their governments to survive the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the head of the UN labour agency said on Friday.

  • 24 Abr 2020

    Mogadishu – The United Nations in Somalia extends its warmest wishes to all Somalis as the holy month of Ramadan begins.

    “The holy month of Ramadan is a special time for solidarity and kindness; reflection and renewal. With...

  • 23 Abr 2020

    United Nations Information Service in Geneva - 23 April 2020             

     

    Alessandra...

  • 23 Abr 2020

    An upsurge in military action against armed groups in West Africa’s vast Sahel and Lake Chad regions has prompted the United Nations refugee agency to call on all warring parties to protect people caught up in the violence.

  • 23 Abr 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic is creating opportunities for cooperation that Israelis and Palestinians must embrace to sustain Middle East peace efforts and bring an end to decades of conflict, the United Nations’ top envoy in the region said on Thursday.

  • 23 Abr 2020

    I would like to extend my best wishes to everyone in Yemen, at the start of the Holy month of Ramadan.

    To the people of Yemen: I wish Ramadan brings you its gifts of peace, reconciliation and joy. I hope you will continue to raise your voices to demand peace and to defend your right to a better future.  

    To the parties to the conflict, I say: be guided by the spirit of the Holy month and put an end to the suffering of your people. Put...

  • 23 Abr 2020

    Mister President,

    Members of the Security Council,

    I brief you today as the Middle East continues to confront the monumental challenge of containing the COVID-19 pandemic.

    On 23 March, the Secretary-General launched an appeal for an immediate global ceasefire. On 11 April, my fellow Envoys to the Middle East and I echoed the Secretary-General’s call and restated our firm commitment to preventive diplomacy, to assisting all efforts to respond to the health...

  • 23 Abr 2020

    THE SECRETARY-GENERAL

    --

    MESSAGE ON THE BEGINNING OF RAMADAN

     

    I extend my warmest wishes as millions of Muslims around the world begin observing the holy month of Ramadan.

    This will, of course, be a very different Ramadan. Many community...

  • 23 Abr 2020

    In Libya, ongoing heavy fighting has raised concerns yet further, about the likely devastating impact of the new coronavirus on people there, particularly those repeatedly forced to flee violence.

  • 23 Abr 2020

    Mogadishu – Today, the United Nations and partners in Somalia launched the Somalia COVID-19 Preparedness and Response Plan (CPRP) to address the immediate humanitarian impact and socio-economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic in the country.  

    “The impact of COVID-19 is bound to be devastating,” said Mr. Adam Abdelmoula, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia. “The priority now is to avert large-...

  • 23 Abr 2020

    KABUL - On behalf of the United Nations family in Afghanistan I extend my warmest wishes to all Afghans as the month of Ramadan begins.

    ...
  • 23 Abr 2020

    I extend my warmest wishes as millions of Muslims around the world begin observing the holy month of Ramadan.

    This will, of course, be a very different Ramadan. Many community activities will naturally be affected by...

  • 22 Abr 2020

    There is a need for concerted efforts to ensure that there is consensus in...

  • 22 Abr 2020

    Sweeping preventative measures seem to be curbing the spread of COVID-19 in the Great Lakes region of Africa, but the economic impact of the global pandemic threatens hard-won gains made along the long road back to peace and stability, the Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for the region said on Wednesday.

  • 22 Abr 2020

    Under Secretary-General Rosemary A. DiCarlo's remarks at the Arria Formula meeting on “Climate and Security risks: the latest data. What can the UN do to prevent climate-related conflicts and how can we climate-proof UN in-country activities?”

     

    Excellencies,
    Distinguished Delegates,
    Ladies and Gentlemen.

    I would like to thank the co-sponsors for convening this meeting on climate and security risks, particularly on Earth Day.

    The response to the COVID-19 pandemic has commanded much of our attention of late. However, we cannot let up on our efforts to address the climate emergency – another global phenomenon with far-reaching implications, including on peace and security.

    The recent report by the World Meteorological Organization on the State of the Global Climate underlines the magnitude of the challenge. We have the highest concentration of greenhouse gas emissions in three million years and ocean levels are at record highs. The last decade was the hottest on record. These effects have impact not just on the natural world but on the daily lives of people, communities and nations. They often hit hardest in already fragile contexts.

    While climate change is rarely the main driver of conflict, it multiplies existing risks and exacerbates factors that we know can lead to insecurity. The manifestation of these linkages is highly specific to context.

    In Sudan, for instance, the convergence of climatic pressures on agriculture and pastoralism with ethno-political factors contributed to the escalation of violence in Darfur and made the conflict harder to resolve. In Syria and Iraq, Da’esh exploited increasing competition over natural resources and weaponized water by controlling access and diverting rivers. In Central America and the Caribbean, the destruction wrought by extreme weather events has devastated critical infrastructure and displaced populations, and in some places, has been linked to a spike in crime rates.

    The risk of a vicious cycle of climate disaster and insecurity is real. It is no coincidence that among the 20 countries most vulnerable to climate change according to the Notre Dame Global Adaptation Initiative, half are also dealing with violent conflict.

     

    Excellencies,

    The Secretary-General has repeatedly warned that the far-reaching effects of climate change are a danger to peace.

    We have seen how climate change undermines our core objectives of conflict prevention and sustaining peace.

    In Somalia, for instance, climate stressors are a leading cause of large-scale displacement, which reduces the coping capacity of communities and undermines livelihoods. This in turn lowers the opportunity cost of negative coping strategies, such as recruitment into terrorist or criminal groups, and hampers efforts to build peace.

    Climate security is about re-examining our underlying assumptions of prevention and sustaining peace, understanding how climate change affects our mandates and working with partners to find innovative solutions.

    I would like to highlight four areas of focus for the Department of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs as we address climate-related security risks.

     

    1) We are strengthening our capacity for integrated risk analysis.

    Climate-related security risks are the product of interactions between climate stressors and pre-existing socio-economic, political and demographic factors. Successful prevention and response strategies depend on an understanding of the context. We must be careful to avoid blanket assertions and template approaches.

    Consider the Lake Chad Basin, where a complex web of environmental degradation, socio-economic marginalization and intercommunal tensions has eroded the resilience of 45 million people and created a multidimensional crisis.

    To further our understanding of climate risks, DPPA has launched a joint initiative with the UN Development Programme and the UN Environment Programme – called the Climate Security Mechanism. With the aim of building capacity and strengthening partnerships, the mechanism has developed guidance to promote the systematic analysis of climate-related security risks and support response.

    I want to stress that gender sensitivity forms a critical part of our analysis. Women often carry a disproportionate burden as inequalities and discrimination increase their vulnerability and undermine their coping capacity. At the same time, as providers of water, food and fuel for cooking, women often possess unique knowledge that may allow them to protect livelihoods. They bring a different perspective to the climate security discourse.

     

    2) We are integrating a climate lens into our efforts at mediation and preventive diplomacy.

    As climate change affects resource availability and forces large-scale socio-economic and political transitions, the motivations and calculations of conflict actors may change. Partnering closely with national and regional actors, where possible, we are working to ensure our peacemaking and mediation strategies take these effects into account.

    In West Africa and the Sahel, where climate change exacerbates competition over natural resources, our regional office – UNOWAS – leads UN efforts to find peaceful solutions to the increasingly deadly conflicts between pastoral and farming communities. Working with the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), it has identified good practices for local conflict prevention and dispute resolution that factor in climate trends, promote inclusivity, strengthen intercommunal consultation committees, and conduct targeted advocacy.

     

    3) We are investing in peacebuilding programmes to help strengthen the resilience of States and communities to cope with climate-related security risks.

    Integrated peacebuilding and climate adaptation programming can reduce vulnerabilities and increase resilience, charting a path of escape from the vicious cycles of climate disaster and conflict.

    We count on women and youth as partners and leaders in this regard. As climate change alters traditional gender roles, power relations and livelihood patterns, new entry points for engaging women in conflict prevention and peacebuilding emerge.

    For example, where environmental degradation forces men to migrate seasonally in search of livelihood options, women often assume greater responsibility in households and communities.

    In the cross-border area of Mali and Niger, for instance, the Peacebuilding Fund aims to reduce conflicts related to natural resources through strengthening the active participation of women in decision-making processes and supporting their economic empowerment.

     

    4) We are committed to working with and learning from our partners.

    Communities all over the world have for centuries effectively adapted to the changing environment in peaceful ways. Local knowledge provides a critical foundation for community-based adaptation and peacebuilding.

    In parts of the world affected particularly hard by climate change, regional organizations often lead the charge against the negative consequences for peace and security.

    The Pacific is on the front lines of climate change and in the Boe Declaration laid out a comprehensive framework to address the implications for regional security. The UN is supporting the Pacific Islands Forum and other partners to operationalize the Declaration and enhance regional capacity to address climate-related security risks.

    Further, we welcome efforts by the African Union to integrate climate change into the African Peace and Security Architecture and look forward to continuing our collaboration on climate security in the context of the AU-UN Joint Task Force.

     

    Excellencies,

    Climate-related security risks already form part of reality for millions of people around the world. Science tells us that without decisive action, climate change will further accelerate, with compounding implications for peace and security.

    The Covid-19 pandemic reminds us that we live in an interconnected world. The notion of a distant, isolated crisis is an illusion. Peace and security risks brought on by climate change in one part of the world could have broader implications beyond that region.

    Knowing what we know, the need for our collective action is urgent.

    Thank you.

  • 22 Abr 2020

    New York, 23 April 2020

    Girls in ICT Day is all about encouraging girls and young women to take up the exciting potential of a career in...

  • 22 Abr 2020

    New York, April 2020

    The COVID-19 pandemic is a public health emergency — but it is far more. 

    It is an economic crisis.  A social crisis.  And a human crisis that is fast becoming a human rights crisis.

    ...
  • 22 Abr 2020

    The Special Envoy of the United Nations Secretary-General for the Great Lakes region, Huang Xia, briefed the Security Council members on the latest developments in the Great...

  • 22 Abr 2020

    Garowe – Like many other countries, Somalia is battling the coronavirus (COVID-19) global health emergency, with its first reported case announced in mid-March.  However, unlike...

  • 22 Abr 2020

    Since the establishment of the Territorial Area for Training and Reintegration in Carrizal, Remedios, Antioquia, former FARC combatants began efforts to protect the environment. Three tree plant-a-thons have already taken place, and 10...

  • 21 Abr 2020

    A World Health Organization (WHO) worker has been killed while driving a vehicle carrying COVID-19 samples in Myanmar’s western Rakhine state, the United Nations country office confirmed in a statement on Tuesday. 

  • 21 Abr 2020

    New-York, 22 April 2020

    On this International Mother Earth Day, all eyes are on the COVID-19 pandemic – the biggest test the world has faced since the Second World War.

    We must work together to save lives, ease suffering and lessen the shattering economic and social consequences.

    The impact of the coronavirus is both immediate and dreadful...

  • 21 Abr 2020

    New-York, 22 March 2020

    The world’s water resources are under unprecedented threat. Today, some 2.2 billion people lack safe drinking water and 4.2...

  • 20 Abr 2020

    The Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Office for West Africa and the Sahel (UNOWAS), Mohamed Ibn Chambas, continues his meetings with Resident Coordinators of the United Nations System in the countries of the sub-region.

    These meetings are part of the work of UNOWAS with regional and international partners to assess the impact of COVID-19, and effectively coordinate United Nations...

  • 20 Abr 2020

    TRIPOLI, 20 APRIL 2020 - UNSMIL is extremely concerned about the deteriorating humanitarian situation in Tripoli and its surroundings as a result of the intensification...

  • 19 Abr 2020

    New-York, 25 April 2020

    We mark this first observance of International Delegates Day at a time when international cooperation has never been...

  • 18 Abr 2020

    We, the Co-Chairs of the Geneva International Discussions (GID), recalling our statement from 31 March, and in the spirit of the call of UN Secretary General Guterres, strongly urge all the GID participants to set aside differences and to refrain from actions that could lead to increased tension.

    The focus should be on collaboration, for the good of all people in the region and against the common threat of the COVID-19 pandemic. The reported erection of signs along the South Ossetian dividing line today predictably contributes to a tense atmosphere on the ground and rids the local people of their livelihoods.

    In the face of the current global challenge of COVID-19, requiring joint approaches and co-operation amongst all, we hereby repeat our call on all participants to avoid provocative measures and focus on improving the situation of the conflict-affected population.

  • 17 Abr 2020

    There are a lot of information about the COVID-19, but not all of them are correct. False information (Fake news) can come from several forms: posts on social media, rumors in...

  • 17 Abr 2020

    In the context of the support to the country’s response to COVID-19, which include a series of activities from strengthening the country’s health system to communication, the UN in...

  • 17 Abr 2020

    New York – April 17, 2020. Members of the Security Council reiterated their full and unanimous support for the peace process in Colombia, and reaffirmed their commitment to working closely with Colombia to progress in implementation of the Final Peace Agreement. They welcomed both parties’ continued commitment to this end, and strongly supported complementary efforts by the United Nations Verification Mission and Country Team. They stressed the importance of the...

  • 17 Abr 2020

    The head of the UN children’s fund UNICEF warned on Friday that 250 million children around the world living in the “waking nightmare” of conflict desperately need warring parties to stop fighting as the COVID-19 pandemic spreads. 

  • 17 Abr 2020

     

    10 - 17 April 2020

    This Week in DPPA is a brief roundup of political and peacebuilding events and developments at UNHQ and around the world.

    Donor Support for DPPA

    DPPA launched its Annual Report under the Multi-Year Appeal (MYA) this week. The report showcases how voluntary contributions made a difference in 2019, allowing the Department to be more operational and seize opportunities to prevent violence and defuse tensions in mission and non-mission settings such as Bolivia, El Salvador, Papua New Guinea-Bougainville, Sudan, Ukraine, and Yemen. For the fourth consecutive year, the MYA surpassed its resource mobilization target last year. Against $30 million requested in 2019 to cover its six priority areas, DPPA successfully mobilized $35.3 million in contributions from 30 donors (Appeal 118 per cent funded). 
    Read more here

     

    COVID-19  

    Middle East - Joint appeal to end hostilities  
    Geir O. Pedersen, Special Envoy for Syria; Ján Kubiš, Special Coordinator for Lebanon; Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Iraq; Martin Griffiths, Special Envoy for Yemen, and Nickolay Mladenov, Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process, issued a joint appeal on 11 April where they urged warring parties in the region to end hostilities in line with the Secretary-General's call for a global ceasefire during the COVID-19 pandemic. "We call on all parties to engage, in good faith and without preconditions, on negotiating immediate halts to ongoing hostilities, sustaining existing ceasefires, putting in place more durable and comprehensive ceasefires, and achieving longer-term resolutions to the persistent conflicts across the region", the five envoys said.  
    Read the appeal here Read more in UN News 

     

    Mladenov: “If current trends continue, the damage to the Palestinian economy will be substantial” 
    Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process issued a statement on 12 April where he expressed concern about the socio-economic consequences of the COVID-19 health crisis on the Palestinian people, particularly in vulnerable communities in Gaza. ”In addition to the public health implications of the pandemic, the negative shock to the Israeli and Palestinian economies will have profound implications for public welfare, employment, social cohesion, financial and institutional stability,” Mr. Mladenov said, adding that: “If current trends continue, the damage to the Palestinian economy will be substantial.” 
    Read more here 

    The Special Coordinator met with Israeli President Reuven Rivlin on 16 April and thanked him for his engagement with the UN during the pandemic. “Now is the time for all to reach across divides and help fight the common enemy. Israelis and Palestinians can and must work together to tackle the health, social and economic effects of COVID-19, Mr. Mladenov tweeted after the meeting. 

    For up-to-date information on COVID-19 and its impact, please visit:   
    WHO website  
    UN coronavirus website 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Security Council

    Ruiz Massieu: Coronavirus pandemic is having a profound impact on Colombia, and the peace process will undoubtedly feel its effects 
    Carlos Ruiz Massieu, Special Representative and Head of the UN Verification Mission in Colombia, on 14 April updated the Security Council on the review of the period from 27 December 2019 to 26 March 2020. I the most recent report, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres highlights the Government's commitment to ensuring the sustained implementation of peace-related programs in the complicated context of the ongoing health emergency. “COVID-19 is and will continue affecting the implementation of the Peace Agreement and the Mission’s verification activities. However, we have a collective obligation to continue to ensure progress in its implementation. Peace in Colombia cannot be, should not be, a casualty of this pandemic,” Mr. Ruiz Massieu affirmed.  
    Read the full statement here 
    Read more in UN News

     

    Griffiths “An opportunity has emerged to bring peace to Yemen” 
    Yemen Envoy Martin Griffiths on 16 April briefed the Council on the situation in the country.  
    “An opportunity has emerged to bring peace to Yemen,” Mr. Griffiths started, referring to the Secretary-General urgent appeal for an immediate end to hostilities. “The threat of COVID-19 in Yemen obviously and evidently and without equivocation requires all our attention and resources. Yemen cannot face two fronts at the same time: a war and a pandemic. The new battle that Yemen faces in confronting the virus will be all-consuming," the Special Envoy said.  
    Read the full statement here 
    Read more in UN News

    Please see the Security Council website for an updated program of work. 

     

    Afghanistan 

    Voices from Afghanistan heard in biggest-ever global conversation on world’s future  
    A world free from violence and discrimination, and where all people have quality access to education, must be the shared goal of everyone to make the planet a better place, said participants in recent discussions held across Afghanistan for the global UN75 initiative. To create a collective vision for the world’s future, Afghans came together in the first quarter of the year, before the first COVID-19 cases were reported in the country, to share their ideas on how to improve the lives of all people, everywhere. “Whatever we do, we must consider the consequences to our environment, as it is our shared responsibility,” stated Rubaba Rezai, a youth activist and environmentalist, at an event in Bamyan. 
    Read more here


    Iraq 

    Meeting with Prime Minister-designate  
    Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, Special Representative and Head of UNAMI, met with Prime Minister-designate Mustafa al-Kadhimi in Baghdad on 12 April. They discussed the ongoing efforts to form a government, and the continued cooperation between the UN and Iraq.  
    For more Information, contact us

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  • 17 Abr 2020

    Note to Correspondents: In response to press queries on regional meeting on Afghanistan

    NEW YORK - Today, the...

  • 16 Abr 2020

    With the COVID-19 pandemic threatening to deepen suffering in Yemen, now is the time for rival parties to commit to ending their conflict, UN Special Envoy Martin Griffiths told the Security Council on Thursday, during an informal meeting via videoconference.

  • 15 Abr 2020

    TRIPOLI, 15 APRIL 2020 – The United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) is alarmed by the continuing escalation of violence in Libya, particularly by...

  • 14 Abr 2020

    While political actors in Colombia are uniting to confront COVID-19, they must also work together to fight “the epidemic of violence” against civil society leaders, human rights defenders and former combatants, the head of the UN mission in the country said on Tuesday during a Security Council meeting held by videoconference.

  • 13 Abr 2020

    DPPA is pleased to present its Annual Report under the Multi-Year Appeal (MYA), showcasing how voluntary contributions made a difference in 2019, allowing us to be more operational and seize opportunities to prevent violence and defuse tensions in mission and non-mission settings such as Bolivia, El Salvador, Papua New Guinea-Bougainville, Sudan, Ukraine, and Yemen.

    Thanks to the confidence donors placed in us, and for the fourth consecutive year, the MYA surpassed its resource mobilization target. Against $30 million requested in 2019 to cover its six priority areas, DPPA successfully mobilized $35.3 million in contributions from 30 donors (Appeal 118 per cent funded).

    We hope that this support will continue to enable us to respond to the challenges to peace and security that the current COVID-19 pandemic is posing. DPPA and the rest of the UN system are looking closely at the implications of the spread of COVID-19 worldwide, including where our Special Political Missions are deployed and active. The Department has been quick to expand its analytical lens to include COVID-19 along other “stressors” that can trigger conflict or violence. Our political analysis is widely shared and contributes to shaping UN responses.

    MYA funding helps us support initiatives by SRSGs and Special Envoys in promoting and following up on the Secretary-General’s call for a global ceasefire. The MYA, with its Rapid Response window, is designed to support new opportunities and crisis-related needs at short notice. DPPA continues to deploy its tools - mediation, electoral assistance, inclusive political analysis -to provide political, technical and operational support to its partners. Demand for our services might take a different form this year but is likely to remain high.

    We have witnessed the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on women and girls, particularly those living in fragile and conflict-affected countries. Together with the wider UN system and its partners, DPPA continues to support women’s participation in politics and all matters of peace and security.

    DPPA is currently undertaking an assessment of its MYA projects to re-prioritize and re-purpose unspent programme funds in consultation with Headquarters and the field. We will communicate our new funding target once we have greater clarity on how operations can be conducted in the field. We will strive to keep our partners regularly informed through the Donor Group and other forums.

    With competition for resources intensifying, the MYA is more important than ever for our work. We hope to be able to count on support from our donors this year to continue delivering on our mandate as fully and effectively as possible. For any information on the MYA, please contact: dppa-donorrelations@un.org

  • 13 Abr 2020

    DPPA is pleased to present its Annual Report under the Multi-Year Appeal (MYA), showcasing how voluntary contributions made a difference in 2019, allowing us to be more operational and seize opportunities to prevent violence and defuse tensions in mission and non-mission settings such as Bolivia, El Salvador, Papua New Guinea-Bougainville, Sudan, Ukraine, and Yemen.

    Thanks to the confidence donors placed in us, and for the fourth consecutive year, the MYA surpassed its resource mobilization target. Against $30 million requested in 2019 to cover its six priority areas, DPPA successfully mobilized $35.3 million in contributions from 30 donors (Appeal 118 per cent funded).

    We hope that this support will continue to enable us to respond to the challenges to peace and security that the current COVID-19 pandemic is posing. DPPA and the rest of the UN system are looking closely at the implications of the spread of COVID-19 worldwide, including where our Special Political Missions are deployed and active. The Department has been quick to expand its analytical lens to include COVID-19 along other “stressors” that can trigger conflict or violence. Our political analysis is widely shared and contributes to shaping UN responses.

    MYA funding helps us support initiatives by SRSGs and Special Envoys in promoting and following up on the Secretary-General’s call for a global ceasefire. The MYA, with its Rapid Response window, is designed to support new opportunities and crisis-related needs at short notice. DPPA continues to deploy its tools - mediation, electoral assistance, inclusive political analysis -to provide political, technical and operational support to its partners. Demand for our services might take a different form this year but is likely to remain high.

    We have witnessed the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on women and girls, particularly those living in fragile and conflict-affected countries. Together with the wider UN system and its partners, DPPA continues to support women’s participation in politics and all matters of peace and security.

    DPPA is currently undertaking an assessment of its MYA projects to re-prioritize and re-purpose unspent programme funds in consultation with Headquarters and the field. We will communicate our new funding target once we have greater clarity on how operations can be conducted in the field. We will strive to keep our partners regularly informed through the Donor Group and other forums.

    With competition for resources intensifying, the MYA is more important than ever for our work. We hope to be able to count on support from our donors this year to continue delivering on our mandate as fully and effectively as possible. For any information on the MYA, please contact: dppa-donorrelations@un.org

  • 13 Abr 2020
     

    COVID-19 RESPONSE | WHO supports health authorities with early...

  • 13 Abr 2020

    KABUL - A world free from violence and discrimination, and where all people have quality access to education, must be the shared goal of everyone to make the...

  • 12 Abr 2020

    11 April 2020 - On 23 March, the Secretary-General launched an appeal for an immediate Global Ceasefire, urging all warring parties to pull back from hostilities, put aside mistrust and animosity, and silence their guns. Many parties have responded positively to the Secretary-General’s appeal, but more needs to be done to translate these words into actions.

    Too many in the Middle East have endured conflict and deprivation for far too long. Their suffering is now...

  • 12 Abr 2020

    “I am concerned about the socio-economic consequences of the COVID-19 health crisis on the Palestinian people, particularly vulnerable communities in Gaza.

    In addition to the public health implications of the pandemic, the negative shock to the Israeli and Palestinian economies will have profound implications for public welfare, employment, social cohesion, financial and institutional stability.

    ...
  • 12 Abr 2020

    Mogadishu – Somalia’s international partners* express their solidarity with the Somali people and government at all levels in facing the global pandemic of the coronavirus (COVID-19).  They commend the Somali authorities for the...