Bienvenue aux Nations Unies

Reports and Policy Documents

2024

  • 2 mai 2024

    Baidoa – Continuing her farewell meetings with Somali leaders, the UN’s top official for Somalia today visited Baidoa, where she met with South West State’s President Abdiaziz Hassan...

  • 2 mai 2024

    The relentless Israeli offensive in the Gaza Strip has set back Palestine’s overall socio-economic development by more than 20 years, according to a new UN report released on Thursday.

  • 2 mai 2024

    The relentless Israeli offensive in the Gaza Strip has set back Palestine’s overall socioeconomic development by more than 20 years, according to a new UN report released on Thursday.

  • 2 mai 2024

    More than 10,000 people are believed buried under the rubble in Gaza after nearly seven months of devastating conflict, UN humanitarians said on Thursday, citing the enclave’s health authorities.

  • 2 mai 2024

    The Palestinian journalists who have been covering the devastating war in Gaza were named winners of the UNESCO/Guillermo Cano World Press Freedom Prize on Thursday.

  • 2 mai 2024

    More than 10,000 people are believed buried under the rubble in Gaza after nearly seven months of devastating conflict, UN humanitarians said on Thursday, citing the enclave’s health authorities.

  • 2 mai 2024

    As delivered

    Good morning. 

    It's such a great pleasure to be back here in Baidoa, and I want to say a huge thank you to Mr. President and his team for...

  • 2 mai 2024

    TRIPOLI – 2 May – Five teams of young women from the UN in Libya’s Ra’idat youth training programme visited private and international schools in Tripoli this week to raise children’s...

  • 2 mai 2024

     

    ASHGABAT, Turkmenistan

    On 1 May, UNRCCA Preventive Diplomacy Academy invited Ms. Beata Pęksa, the Ambassador of the European...

  • 1 mai 2024

    Palestine’s recent attempt to become a full member of the United Nations was the focus of discussion in the General Assembly on Wednesday. 

  • 1 mai 2024

    Amid growing international calls for restraint from Israel in Gaza and reports on Wednesday of further deadly strikes overnight, UN humanitarians underscored the ongoing devastating impact of the war and the need to ensure reliable aid supply lines to people in desperate need in the enclave.

  • 30 avr 2024

    Madam President, 

    Members of the Security Council,

    Excellencies,

    In July last year, the Department of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs was also invited to brief the Security Council on developments in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Since then, we have observed both positive and worrying developments.

    We note the decision of the European Council in March this year to open accession negotiations with Bosnia and Herzegovina, based on the European Commission’s assessment of progress made by Bosnia and Herzegovina on key legislative and judiciary reforms. There is consensus among the political leadership in Bosnia and Herzegovina that European integration is the best route for ensuring the country’s future stability and prosperity. The European project has become a unique chance for the continent to bridge divides and shape a stable and prosperous future despite ongoing challenges.

    Based on a united commitment towards a stable and peaceful future, Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Council of Ministers in late 2022 sought the support of the United Nations through the Peacebuilding Fund to contribute to strengthening social cohesion, respect for diversity, understanding and trust, especially among young women and men in different communities. Met with a positive response by the Secretary-General, initiatives supported by the Peacebuilding Fund have started being implemented, in close cooperation with authorities at all levels and communities across the country. These projects are focused on the implementation of the Women, Peace and Security and the Youth, Peace and Security agendas, as well as community dialogue.

    Madam President,

    At the same time, in recent months, we have witnessed actions and statements contradictory to the positive developments outlined above.

    The Secretary-General’s Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, who has undertaken official visits to Bosnia and Herzegovina and the region over the past years, has noted concerns about repeated threats of secessionism, the promotion of hate speech, the denial of genocide and the glorification of war criminals who were convicted by local and international courts. She recently issued statements on the dangers of these trends and their long-lasting impact on peace and reconciliation in the country. She has stressed the importance of addressing the legacy of the past, including of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. Only by promoting the understanding of the past through truth-seeking and accountability, and addressing the root causes and the continued impact of such violence on society, can sustainable peace be achieved.

    Madam President,

    The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Court of Justice have established that acts of genocide against the Muslims of Bosnia and Herzegovina were committed in and around Srebrenica in July 1995.

    The Secretary-General has consistently called on everyone in the region and beyond to counter hate speech and the rhetoric of division and narratives of mistrust and fear. He said, and I quote, “All communities, all leaders and all organizations — including the media — must make this pledge.”  

    Many people in Bosnia and Herzegovina have for decades undertaken remarkable work to promote trust and reconciliation in the country. Of course, it is primarily the responsibility of authorities and institutions, at all levels, to help the whole of society constructively deal with the past, to demonstrate respect for all victims and survivors, and to work towards a prosperous and peaceful future for all of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s citizens.

    Madam President,

    I should like to recall that the United Nations is not a signatory to the Dayton Peace Agreement nor a member of the Steering Board of the Peace Implementation Council. The United Nations is committed to support Bosnia and Herzegovina in its path towards reconciliation, peacebuilding and sustainable development.

    Thank you.

  • 30 avr 2024

    ASHGABAT, Turkmenistan

    On April 29, the USAID Central Asia's Regional Water and Vulnerable Environment Activity in...

  • 30 avr 2024
     

    Development | UN-Habitat provides training on...

  • 30 avr 2024

    Ordinary Gazans remain in a “constant state of trauma” over an impending full-scale Israeli attack on the enclave’s southernmost city of Rafah amid a growing number of strikes there, the head of the UN agency for Palestinian refugees said on Tuesday.

  • 30 avr 2024

    With the situation in Gaza “worsening by the day”, UN Secretary-General António Guterres on Tuesday appealed for Israeli and Hamas leaders currently taking part in intense negotiations to reach a ceasefire agreement.

  • 30 avr 2024

    Both positive and “worrying” developments have recently unfolded in Bosnia and Herzegovina, a top UN official told the Security Council on Tuesday at an emergency meeting requested by Russia.

  • 30 avr 2024

    Children as young as four are being forced to go to work in Lebanon amid a “massive collapse” in humanitarian funding and escalating hostilities on the country’s southern border with Israel that threaten to spiral into a “full-scale war”, UN child experts said on Tuesday.

  • 29 avr 2024

    The Office of the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen (OSESGY) and the Spanish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, European Union...

  • 29 avr 2024

    An increase in civilian casualties caused by intensifying attacks from the Russian armed forces against Ukraine’s electric power infrastructure and railway system calls for concern, the UN Human Rights Monitoring Mission in Ukraine (HRMMU) said on Monday. 

  • 29 avr 2024

    The UN agency for Palestinian refugees, UNRWA, reached one of its now-abandoned schools in Khan Younis at the weekend, where thousands of people appeared to have left at a moment’s notice, fearing further intense Israeli bombardment.

  • 29 avr 2024

    The head of UN peacekeeping and demining reiterated calls on Monday for a ceasefire in Gaza as a first step to returning the war-ravaged enclave to some normality, while mine clearance experts warned that the Strip is now at its “most dangerous period”.

  • 29 avr 2024

    Rising violence is again restricting humanitarian aid delivery in the Darfur region of Sudan, the head of the World Food Programme said on Monday. 

  • 27 avr 2024

    UN Security Council members on Saturday called on the warring parties in Sudan to immediately halt the military build-up and take steps to de-escalate the situation in El Fasher, the provincial capital of North Darfur.

  • 27 avr 2024
    A brief roundup of United Nations-related political and peacebuilding events and developments globally.

    Investing in prevention saves lives and money, DiCarlo emphasizes at DPPA donor meeting

    On 24 April, DPPA held its annual donor meeting at UN Headquarters. More than 100 participants from 65 Member States attended the event, demonstrating their strong support for the work of the Department. Underscoring that the current moment was “the most dangerous period in global relations since the end of the Cold War,” Under-Secretary-General Rosemary DiCarlo said “nothing saves as much on humanitarian aid, refugee assistance, the costly consequences of conflict as resolving or preventing it in the first place”.

    Read more

     

    SRSG Salvador underscores “urgent need for international assistance” for Haiti

    On 22 April, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Haiti María Isabel Salvador told the Security Council “some of the worst scenarios for Haiti have become realities in recent months and weeks,” with gang attacks targeting police stations, prisons, schools, hospitals, and religious sites in Port-au-Prince. On the political front, she noted the establishment of a Transitional Presidential Council and urged all Haitian stakeholders to put governance arrangements in place, especially the appointment of an interim Prime Minister and Government and the swift nomination of the Provisional Electoral Council. Salvador highlighted that the first three months of 2024 saw a 53 per cent increase in casualties from the previous reporting period. “The severity of the current crisis underscores the gaps in capacity within the national structures and the urgent need for international assistance, namely through the immediate deployment of the Multinational Security Support mission,” she stressed.

    Read more

    New approach needed to address Syria’s political challenges, Pedersen tells Council  

    On 25 April, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Syria Geir Pedersen told the Council that piecemeal measures to tackle Syria’s political, economic and humanitarian challenges cannot bring stability. He instead called for a new, comprehensive approach that addressed all issues with the warring parties. This approach “would need to fully engage all critical stakeholders — this includes the Syrian parties and the international actors in the Astana format, the Arab Contact Group, the Western Quad and this Council,” Pedersen said. He went on to stress that Syria was becoming “a sort of free-for-all space for settling scores”, citing the “dangerous and escalatory spiral” of recent events, such as the strikes on Iranian diplomatic premises in Damascus widely attributed to Israel and Iran’s retaliatory strikes on Israel.  

    Watch more

    Special Envoy Xia stresses need to avoid “regional conflagration” as violence worsens in DRC

    On 24 April, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for the Great Lakes Region Huang Xia told the Council that the security situation in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo was deteriorating as fighting escalated between the 23 March Movement (M23) rebel group and the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (FARDC). In addition, strained relations between Rwanda and Burundi were also compromising progress, said the Special Envoy. “We must urgently increase our efforts at de-escalation and decrease tensions so as to avoid regional conflagration,” Xia said, welcoming Angolan President João Manuel Gonçalves Lourenço’s political and diplomatic efforts to keep Kinshasa and Kigali engaged in the Luanda process.

    Watch more

    ASG Jenča urges restraint while Nord Stream investigation continues

     

    On 26 April, Assistant Secretary-General Miroslav Jenča told the Council that the destruction of the Nord Stream gas pipelines in September 2022 highlighted the vulnerability of critical commercial and energy infrastructure in the current regional and global context. He went on to note that “the incident has sparked widespread speculations that risk further fueling the already heightened tensions and mistrust" among Member States. “In the current sensitive security context, we urge everyone to exercise restraint while we wait for the remaining investigation to conclude and for the information to be shared accordingly,” he said.

    Watch here

    Peacebuilding Commission holds Ambassadorial-level briefing on activities of the Peacebuilding Fund

    On 25 April, the Peacebuilding Commission held an Ambassadorial-level briefing on activities of the Peacebuilding Fund (PBF) chaired by Sérgio França Danese. Speakers from two major PBF partner countries, Sara Beysolow Nyanti, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Liberia, and Cecilia Adout Majok Adeng, Permanent Representative of South Sudan to the UN, underscored the Fund's contribution to peacebuilding priorities in their countries. Assistant Secretary-General for Peacebuilding Support Elizabeth Spehar briefed Member States on the Fund’s 2023 highlights through the allocation of $202 million in programming, including in UN mission transition contexts, cross-border settings and in support of inclusion of women and youth. She highlighted priorities for 2024, while regretting that reduced voluntary contributions mean the PBF will not be able to commit more than $150 million to new initiatives.

     

    Special Coordinator Wronecka calls for women’s economic empowerment and leadership representation in Lebanon

    This Week, Special Coordinator for Lebanon Joanna Wronecka attended the general assembly meeting of the Lebanese League of Women in Business. In her remarks, Wronecka said that “tireless efforts and contributions toward gender equality and women’s empowerment are even more indispensable today and critical against a backdrop of immense challenges, both nationally and globally.” She went on to note that “Women’s education and economic empowerment is critical to achieving gender equality, inclusive economic growth, development, and poverty reduction in Lebanon. Improving the economic status of women can lead to better outcomes at the individual, family and community level.”

    Special Coordinator Wronecka discusses Lebanese presidential vacuum

    This week, Special Coordinator Wronecka held a round of meetings with Lebanese and foreign stakeholders on the importance of supporting efforts to end Lebanon’s prolonged presidential vacuum. The Special Coordinator met with the Ambassadors of Qatar and Egypt, who are members of the Quintet committee for Lebanon, and with the Ambassador of Jordan. They discussed the best way to coordinate foreign efforts to help Lebanon overcome its political stalemate. In meetings with former Prime Ministers Fuad Siniora (pictured) and Tamam Salam, talks focused on the importance of drawing lessons from history in order to reach viable and long-term solutions. In meetings with several parliamentarians, including from opposition and pro-establishment parties, the Special Coordinator underlined the importance of prioritizing the national interest and fortifying Lebanon’s stability during this period of crisis.

    On Earth Day, DSRSG Isaczai highlights impact of climate change in Iraq

    Marking Earth Day on 22 April, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Iraq Ghulam Isaczai said that climate change was a driver of humanitarian needs that disproportionally affected vulnerable groups, such as smallholder farmers, the poor, and those with existing health conditions. Currently in Iraq, over 21,000 families were displaced because of drought conditions, he said. Iraq's unique ecosystems, such as the Mesopotamian Marshes, faced significant threats from changing climate, resulting in biodiversity and local livelihood losses.

    Watch more

    UNAMI Human Rights Office marks International Roma Day

    On 24 April, the UN Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) Human Rights Office held a workshop to mark International Roma Day. The event brought together 23 participants, including representatives from the Iraqi High Commission for Human Rights and members and representatives of Iraq’s religious and ethnic component groups, including Roma, faith leaders, representatives of civil society and religious endowments as well as journalists. Presentations were made highlighting the human rights challenges facing Iraqi Roma, including their exclusion from mainstream spaces and lack of access to and participation in economic, social, political and cultural life. 

    In Colombia, communities work together to create Café Patía, a coffee for peace

    On 21 April, the UN Verification Mission in Colombia helped launch “Café Patía” on the national marke. Colombia’s peace signatories and the communities from the south of the Department of Cauca worked together to produce a high-quality, environmentally friendly coffee. The initiative aims to help achieve economic reintegration in the region. The coffee is produced by the Cooperativa Integral de Mujeres y Hombres Constructores de Paz ‘Coopatía’, with the support of the UN Verification Mission and the Agency for Reincorporation and Normalisation (ARN).

    Foundation for widowed women victims of the conflict works for peace

    On 20 April in Villavicencio, the Verification Mission supported the annual assembly of the Fundación Sin Olvidos, which brings together widowed women peace signatories and victims of the conflict from various country departments. The Fundación Sin Olvidos was created in 2020 and is led by Luz Marina Giraldo, a peace signatory from the department of Meta. The assembly elected committees to address issues raised by victims, as well as to work on issues related to gender, disability, development and sustainability in the departments of Putumayo, Caquetá, and Huila.

     

     

    Next Week

    On 1 May, Mozambique will assume the Presidency of the Security Council for the month.

  • 26 avr 2024

    ASSISTANT SECRETARY-GENERAL MIROSLAV JENČA’S

    REMARKS TO THE SECURITY COUNCIL

    New York, 26 April 2023

     

    Madam President,

    The destruction of the Nord Stream gas pipelines in September 2022 highlighted the vulnerability of critical commercial and energy infrastructure in the current regional and global context.

    The incident has sparked widespread speculations that risk further fueling the already heightened tensions and mistrust among Member States.

    The Council has convened in total seven times to discuss the issue.

    I recall that our briefings on this topic are based solely on information that is publicly available. The United Nations does not have any additional details of the events and is not in a position to verify or confirm claims or reports made regarding the incident. I will therefore use this opportunity to recap what has been stated so far.

    Between 26 and 29 September 2022, four leaks were reported in the Nord Stream undersea gas pipelines. These pipelines are located in international waters, within the Swedish and Danish economic zones in the Baltic Sea.

    The first leak was reported on the Nord Stream 2 pipeline in the morning of 26 September 2022. Later that day, the second and third leaks were reported on the Nord Stream 1 pipeline. The fourth leak was reported on 29 September on the Nord Stream 2 pipeline.

    While the pipelines were not in operation at the time of the incidents, they reportedly contained several hundred million cubic meters of natural gas.

    In February 2023, the United Nations Environment Programme estimated the plausible range of total methane emissions leaked during the incident to be between 75,000 and 230,000 metric tons.

    The full extent of the environmental impacts of the incident, including on marine and local wildlife, is yet to be grasped.

    After the leaks were reported, the Danish, German and Swedish authorities announced the launch of separate national investigations. The concerned authorities provided updates on their respective investigations, including in a joint letter to the President of the Security Council dated 10 July 2023 [S/2023/517].  

    The letter indicated that, according to the investigations, the leaks were caused by the use of explosives. The authorities also reported having informed the Russian Federation about the progress of the investigations.

    In a letter dated 25 August 2023 from the Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations, addressed to the Secretary-General and the President of the Security Council [S/2023/627], the Russian Federation expressed concerns about these national investigations and called for "comprehensive and objective proceedings".

    In February this year, the Danish and the Swedish authorities informed about the closure of their respective investigations in joint letters from the Permanent Representatives of Denmark, Germany and Sweden to the United Nations, addressed to the President of the Security Council dated 7 and 26 February 2024 [S/2024/149 and S/2024/189].

    We look forward to hearing about the findings and conclusions of the ongoing German investigation in due time.

    In a letter from the Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations, dated 1 March 2024, addressed to the Secretary-General and the President of the Security Council [S/2024/230], the Russian Federation reiterated its concerns and that they see a need for an international commission to investigate the Nord Stream incidents further.

    Madam President,

    We reiterate that any intentional damage to critical civilian infrastructure is of serious concern, should be condemned and investigated.

    In the current sensitive security context, we urge everyone to exercise restraint while we wait for the remaining investigation to conclude and for the information to be shared accordingly.

    We strongly encourage Member States to continue cooperation and sharing of information to ensure the security of all international waters, including the Baltic Sea, which is critical for regional commerce, security, and stability.

    Thank you.

  • 26 avr 2024
  • 26 avr 2024

    Speech for the UN Special Coordinator for Lebanon

    ...
  • 26 avr 2024
  • 26 avr 2024

    MOSCOW, Russia

    On 22-24 April 2024, the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Central Asia, Head of UNRCCA, Kaha Imnadze, paid a working visit to Moscow and had...

  • 26 avr 2024

    As deadly attacks in Ukraine continue, the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) warned on Friday that the number of children killed so far this year has increased by nearly 40 per cent compared to 2023. 

  • 26 avr 2024

    Escalating violence in Sudan’s North Darfur state has left dozens dead and people trapped in El Fasher city, which is home to around 800,000 people, many displaced due to fighting. 

  • 26 avr 2024

    A UN office investigating Israeli accusations that 12 staff members from UN Palestine relief agency UNRWA were involved in the 7 October Hamas-led attacks has closed one of the cases because Israel had not provided any supporting evidence, UN Spokesperson Stéphane Dujarric said on Friday. 

  • 26 avr 2024

    Following the installation of a transitional council in Haiti, seven countries officially notified the UN Secretary-General on Friday of their intention to contribute personnel to the Security Council-backed support mission for the crisis-wracked Caribbean nation. 

  • 26 avr 2024

    Bassem Al-Habal carried a large bag of flour provided by the UN agency for Palestine refugees, UNRWA, inside one of the shelters in the city of Deir Al-Balah in the central Gaza Strip, part of his daily journey to find food and water for his family while overcoming displacement, bombardment and the challenges of being deaf and mute in a war zone.

  • 26 avr 2024

    Making Gaza safe again from unexploded bombs could take 14 years, UN demining experts said on Friday. 

  • 26 avr 2024

    ASHGABAT, Turkmenistan

    On 25 April, the UNRCCA Preventive Diplomacy Academy invited UN Volunteers (UNV) to introduce the United Nations Volunteers...

  • 25 avr 2024
  • 25 avr 2024
  • 25 avr 2024

    The international community must take immediate action to end the wave of sexual violence being carried out against women and girls in Sudan, two senior UN officials said on Thursday.

  • 25 avr 2024

    On 25 April 1974, military officers overthrew the nearly 50-year dictatorship in Portugal in a largely peaceful coup known as the Carnation Revolution.

  • 25 avr 2024

    Unexpected blistering temperatures across Gaza have added to the daily misery faced by the enclave’s people and sparked new fears of disease outbreaks amid a lack of sufficient clean water and waste disposal, UN humanitarians said on Thursday.

  • 25 avr 2024

    The war in Gaza continues to cast a dark shadow over the wider Middle East region, in particular Syria where a series of strikes and attacks are exacerbating an already dire humanitarian situation, the UN Special Envoy for the country said on Thursday.

  • 25 avr 2024

    The international community must take immediate action to end the wave of sexual violence being carried out against women and girls in Sudan, two senior UN officials said on Thursday.

  • 24 avr 2024

    Under-Secretary-General Rosemary A. DiCarlo's

    Remarks at DPPA's Annual Donor Meeting

    New York, 24 April 2024

    Excellencies,

    Colleagues,

    Friends,

    Welcome to the Annual Donor meeting of the Department of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs.  Thank you for being here and for your support of DPPA’s work. 

    Fittingly, today is International Day of Multilateralism and Diplomacy for Peace – a day that really highlights our work, and the challenges we face.

    When we met just over a year ago, the world was still reeling from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.  Two weeks after that meeting, armed conflict exploded in the Sudan, sending the country spiraling.  

    Today, we are more than six months into a devastating Israeli military campaign in Gaza in response to the Hamas terror attacks of 7 October.  And we are seeing the growing regional ramifications of this conflict across the Middle East.

    These wars are destroying lives and compromising the future of millions of people – and they are far from the only ones. Violent conflict has proliferated markedly in the last decade, accelerated by an erosion of – if not an outright assault on - international norms and growing geopolitical competition and division.

    I’ll be blunt: This is the most dangerous period in global relations since the end of the Cold War, perhaps even since the end of the Second World War.

    The UN’s prevention work and our efforts to foster trust, cooperation and solidarity through diplomacy has never been more important.  Similarly, the role of DPPA in accomplishing these tasks is critical.

    This is work that we plainly cannot do without your support.  Work that, though often painstaking, arduous and discreet, makes a difference, even if it rarely makes the headlines.

    Let me also be blunt on another aspect.  These are difficult times politically – but also financially.  DPPA has been deeply affected by the liquidity situation and the resultant measures and constraints affecting regular budget resources and activities. 

    We know this is a difficult time for many of you.  Some of our partners have cut back.  Others have told us that they will not be able to maintain their support at the same level as in previous years. 

    We understand the constraints you face.  But I can also assure you that the return on your investment is worth it. We are not a costly operation.  Conflict prevention saves lives – and it is cost-effective. 

    Nothing saves as much on humanitarian aid, refugee assistance, the costly consequences of conflict as resolving or averting it in the first place. 

    Friends,

    Today, I want to share with you some of the progress we made in 2023.  We will also endeavour to respond to your questions and concerns. 

    And I hope that we will leave here today with an even stronger shared commitment to do all we can to advance peace and security globally – and to leverage the cost-effectiveness of conflict resolution and conflict prevention.

    As you know, we are currently in the thick of preparations for the Summit of the Future in September. In 2023, the Secretary-General tasked DPPA as the lead penholder for his policy brief on “A New Agenda for Peace.”  The New Agenda outlines his vision for how Member States can advance shared interests and strengthen multilateral action for peace.

    In the brief the Secretary-General stresses his commitment to enhance his Good Offices to prevent and mediate conflicts as well as the importance of addressing drivers of conflict.  Conflict prevention is a central theme.

    DPPA widely consulted Member States and other stakeholders for our analysis and recommendations with the support of the Multi-Year Appeal.

    Such consultations and engagement, and translating them into analysis and policy recommendations, are a foundation of our work.  They are also vital for the Secretary-General’s Special Representatives and Special Envoys, who rely on the MYA for many of their diplomatic efforts.  

    In a few minutes, the Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for the Horn of Africa, Hanna Tetteh, will share with you how the MYA supports her ongoing efforts in the Horn of Africa.

    Indeed, the MYA supports a broad range of activities including political and peace processes:

    • In relation to Gaza and the ongoing conflict in the Middle East, MYA funding has enabled DPPA to meet critical monitoring and analysis demands.  This has helped ensure timely and effective support to the wider  UN system.
    • The situation in in Ukraine continues to require timely and actionable political analysis to inform the UN response.  Our liaison office in Kyiv, funded 100% from extrabudgetary resources under the MYA, provides updates and inputs, including for over 100 Security Council briefings over the past year.
    • On Sudan, following the closure of UNITAMS, DPPA is supporting the new Personal Envoy of the Secretary-General, Ramtane Lamamra, in a challenging assignment.  MYA funding is critical to equip him with staff support and other capacities.
    • In Haiti, amid escalating gang violence, MYA-funded support has enabled DPPA and BINUH to engage politically and bring together civil society stakeholders. This remains critical in the present volatile conditions in the country.
    • In Colombia, the UN contributed to significant advances in peace talks in 2023 between the Government and the National Liberation Army (ELN).  The MYA enabled us to complement the resources of the Verification Mission regarding the inclusion of women in implementation of the 2016 Peace Agreement.
    • In Afghanistan, MYA funding enabled DPPA to support UNAMA in advocating for women’s rights, facilitating dialogue with authorities, and maintaining workforce diversity.  
    • And in Mozambique, the MYA supported our efforts on the disarmament and successful reintegration of combatants. The closure of the final RENAMO base in June last year successfully completed the reintegration of all 5,221 former combatants into communities throughout the country.  With this success, the good offices of the Personal Envoy of the Secretary-General for Mozambique concluded in October 2023.
    • Our Rapid Response mechanism continued to enable us to quickly act on emerging needs by deploying resources within 72 hours.  This agility was crucial in providing timely interventions in Chad and in the Tigray region of Ethiopia, where we supported prevention and peacebuilding efforts at critical moments.  We did so working closely with the RCs and UN Country Teams in both countries.
    • We also provided timely and risk-responsive support to our partners in the field.  Funded by the MYA, our Standby Team of Senior Mediation Advisers engaged in 131 mediation support assignments in approximately 26 different contexts in 2023.  The African continent saw the largest share of these engagements.

    These examples underscore the increasing demand for our services and expertise.  Each crisis presents unique challenges.  Your contributions make possible the tailored responses such challenges require.

    Colleagues,

    In 2023, we again balanced crisis response with non-crisis prevention efforts.  This is always a challenge, but one that is more pronounced the more crises there are – and when we have to make do with limited resources.

    DPPA led 53 electoral missions to Member States, demonstrating our commitment to supporting democratic processes globally.   

    We dedicated $8.2 million, or 19 per cent of the MYA budget, to Women, Peace, and Security initiatives. This surpasses our target [18 per cent] and demonstrates a firm commitment to inclusive political and peacemaking efforts.

    Through our MYA-funded Innovation Cell, we used AI technology to promote participation in peace and political initiatives, notably enhancing the inclusion of youth.  

    In Bolivia and Guinea, for example, we engaged youth in meaningful consultations in the context of political transitions.  Our  virtual reality films about Lebanon and Chad provided viewers with insights into local challenges.  

    We also provided essential real-time support to combat disinformation and hate speech across various field presences.  

    For example, we helped UNAMI with social media monitoring ahead of municipal elections in December and enhanced analytical support for UNOCA, UNOWAS, UNSCOL and the Verification Mission in Colombia.

    Our work on climate, peace, and security relies also entirely on voluntary contributions through the MYA.  In 2023, we enhanced our capacity to address climate-related security risks in the field.  

    We successfully deployed climate, peace, and security advisors to our special political missions across West Africa and the Sahel [UNOWAS], Central Africa [UNOCA], the Horn of Africa [OSE-Horn of Africa], Somalia [UNSOM], and Iraq [UNAMI].

    Additional deployments are planned for this year [e.g. UNAMA].  By doing so, we are advancing from general policy work to concrete, operational engagement on the ground – where it matters.

    As always, over the past year, we also continued to emphasize and deepen our partnerships with regional and sub-regional organizations.  

    For many years, we have maintained liaison presences that have enabled collaboration and partnership with such organizations, across the globe.  However, some of these critical collaborations are now at risk of being downsized or closed due to funding constraints.

    But while the world is confronting more and more crises, in 2023, we achieved only 76 per cent of our annual funding target of $41 million. We gratefully received a total amount of $31.1 million from 31 donors.  The resultant 24 per cent funding gap, equivalent to $9.9 million, highlights the critical need for sustained and enhanced support.   

    For this cycle of our Multi-Year Appeal from 2023 to 2026, we are seeking to raise a total of $170 million. Our immediate goal for 2024 is $42 million. This funding enables us to do things, concretely and operationally.  It also enables us to maintain our work on key thematic areas of engagement, be it the women, peace and security agenda; climate, peace and security; our mediation support; and innovation.

    Excellencies, colleagues,

    Allow me to conclude very simply by expressing my sincere gratitude and that of our colleagues in the field and here at HQ for your indispensable support.

    We know you face many appeals for contributions, and that the current funding environment is difficult. That you have consistently shown up to bolster our efforts, over and above what you already contribute to the UN budget, is deeply appreciated.  And we hope, very much, that you can continue to do so.

    I would now like to give the floor to Special Envoy Hanna Tetteh.  

    Hanna is joining us from Addis Ababa and will be speaking about the impact of extra-budgetary contributions on her work.

    Thank you.

     

  • 24 avr 2024

    Dangerous levels of acute hunger affected a staggering 281.6 million people last year - the fifth year in a row that food insecurity has worsened - heightening growing fears of famine and “widespread death” from Gaza to Sudan and beyond, UN agencies warned on Wednesday.

  • 24 avr 2024

    Russia used its veto to quash a draft resolution aimed at keeping weapons out of outer space.

  • 24 avr 2024

    The UN agency that assists Palestine refugees, UNRWA, launched a $1.2 billion appeal on Wednesday to address the unprecedented humanitarian crisis in the besieged Gaza Strip and to respond to needs in the West Bank as violence there increases. 

  • 23 avr 2024

    UN Special Coordinator Joanna Wronecka held a round of meetings with Lebanese and foreign stakeholders on the importance of...

  • 23 avr 2024

    UN Special Coordinator for Lebanon Joanna Wronecka delivered this week a keynote address at the general assembly...